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3
votes
1answer
619 views

Usage of infinitives in this sentence

In my academics I learned that we use infinitives (to + verb 1st form). So I was surprised when someone told me this sentence is incorrect. I am not able to figure it out why this sentence is ...
-2
votes
2answers
167 views

permit vs cause causality

On English causality: Does the superset of permissive action always incorporate the possibility of direct causative action? That is if I translate a statement as X permitted Y but X actually caused Y ...
3
votes
10answers
877 views

Is this grammatical construction an imperative for the third person?

Is the construction 'Let + subject + verb' considered as an order/imperative for the third person: Let every man count his days when it is intended to mean 'must'/'is ordered to'?
7
votes
2answers
941 views

Is “want” a causative verb?

I've always held on to the definition that Causative Verbs express how the Noun before the Verb influences the execution of an action. Similarly, the Longman Student Grammar of Spoken and Written ...
14
votes
2answers
341 views

What’s going on with “drink > drench”? Is it like “passage > passenger”?

Edit: I am looking for a particular linguistic term for this process (which here uses terminal palatalization to indicate such) of turning passive verbs like drink into active verbs like drench. I ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Causative verb using have/has

I can understand the causative form (quite less frequently, we simply say causal verb) with make and get but when used with have/has, it sometimes makes me think differently. Of course, I can ...
0
votes
3answers
526 views

What is the difference between remember and remind [closed]

Could someone explain the difference between these two words? Here is an example of using each. Your hair and eyes remind me of your mother. I can remember people's faces, but not their names.
7
votes
2answers
4k views

“Fall”, “fell”, “felled”

How is the causative form of fall used in English? In the present tense, often enough, A tree falls in the woods, but a logger falls trees as well. but in the past tense, A tree fell in the ...