The distinctions between subject and object forms of pronouns.

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72
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5answers
8k views

What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?

I can never figure out whether I should use who and whom. Most people use who for both colloquially, but that’s not correct. What’s the rule for using who and whom correctly?
15
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5answers
3k views

Why do we use the object instead of the subject pronoun in constructions like “stupid me”?

I'm trying to find out how come we say lucky me and stupid us rather than lucky I and stupid we. My understanding is that this is not a recent invention, but a relic from the distant past where it was ...
13
votes
7answers
17k views

Which one is correct to say: “It's me” or “It's I”?

I was taught at school that the following expression is not grammatically correct: Who is there? It's me. The correct one is: Who is there? It's I. Can you let me know which one is ...
13
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5answers
2k views

Is it correct to say that English has the dative case?

Is it correct to say that, nowadays, English has the dative case, or was it only present in Old English?
9
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3answers
2k views

“You know more about this than me/I” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: I can run faster than _. (1) him (2) he? Which is correct? You know more about this than me. You know more about this than I. The second sounds unnatural, but ...
8
votes
4answers
1k views

“That was me” vs. “That was I” [duplicate]

When telling a story about myself from the past, I have found myself in an internal debate over whether the correct way to segue into the present is: That was me twelve years ago. Or: That ...
8
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3answers
2k views

Which is grammatically correct: “Let he who…” or “Let him who…”

Let he who believes in this prophet speak now what he knows. Let him who believes in this prophet speak now what he knows.
8
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3answers
311 views

“A similar hat to Jane” vs “A hat similar to Jane’s”

Of late I have noticed British people using the following sort of construct: John and Jane make such a cute couple because John always wears a similar hat to Jane. To my ear, that is ...
8
votes
1answer
241 views

Does “In the event of …” take the genitive case?

Is insisting on a genitive pronoun after "In the event of ..." pedantry or correct? For example: "In the event of ..." his/him winning the election my/me dying our/us leaving For those who ...
7
votes
2answers
10k views

“Me and my wife” or “my wife and me”

Which is correct: me and my wife or my wife and me? The sentence in which this is used is Ms. Smith informed me and my wife that she was afraid of being accosted.
6
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3answers
2k views

“…as you and I am” versus “…as you and I are”

Which is the correct usage to end the following sentence? [person] is not as [adjective] as you and I [am/are]. I'd also like to see some good fill-in-the-blanks.
6
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3answers
478 views

In “Enter John”, is John in the nominative or accusative case?

This question made me think about the structure of the sentence. I'm familiar with the expression 'Enter Michael'/'Exit John' to represent Michael's or John's entry or exit, respectively, to a ...
6
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3answers
634 views

Which grammatical case is “him” in “I help him”, and why?

In languages which distinguish the accusative and dative cases, it is clear from the actual usage whether a divalent verb takes a direct or indirect object. For example, the German eat takes a direct ...
6
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4answers
1k views

Who vs whom in "Who is the right person to turn to? [duplicate]

Take the sentence: Who is the right person to turn to? I'm not sure whether who or whom should be used in this position.
6
votes
1answer
893 views

Grammar/case in a salutation/greeting

I have a simple question — in a greeting or salutation such as "Good Morning Jane", since I believe it is a contraction, is Jane the object (as in "Good Morning to Jane") or is it the subject (as in ...
5
votes
3answers
56k views

“With who” vs. “with whom”

Is this correct? The person with whom I'm doing the project should be here soon. If it is, is with always a dative preposition (like mit in German)?
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “you and I” the subject in this sentence?

I know that "you and I" should be used when it's the subject of a sentence, and "you and me" when it's a complement. But I'm not sure about the following phrase: We are very good pals, you and I. ...
5
votes
2answers
322 views

Subject vs. Object marking for whoever?

I know similar questions have been asked before, but I'm having trouble reconciling the following sentence, received in an email: Can we ask whomever is your contact there to email us a job so we ...
5
votes
1answer
172 views

Is this use of whomever correct?

I take pride in my ability to deliver a warm and friendly welcome to whomever I meet. My reasoning is that I am doing the meeting and the object is merely being met, hence whomever.
4
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1answer
3k views

When to use “we” and “us” — specific SAT example [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: I can run faster than _. (1) him (2) he? I am confused about the usage of the words 'we' and 'us'. I am using a Princeton Review 11 SAT tests 2011 edition, practice test ...
4
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5answers
80 views

“A threat to us people” or “a threat to we people”? [closed]

Which of these is correct: Global warming is a great threat to us people. Global warming is a great threat to we people.
3
votes
3answers
282 views

Is the “us” in “all that will be left is us” correct usage?

In this sentence taken from the movie AI is 'us' the correct form of the pronoun? It certainly sounds better than if it were written with 'we' instead of 'us'. Also, I can sort of see why 'is' is ...
3
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3answers
2k views

Should I capitalize the word 'Web' in this sentence?

A dedicated web server may be required, depending on XXX, YYY, ZZZ, and the total number of concurrent Web users
3
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3answers
467 views

“Whom” or “who” and replies to such questions

Which is the most natural way to ask the question below? Are the replies correct? (Words in parentheses show that they are optional.) Whose are these notebooks? - (Of) our students./These ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

“Whoever” Vs. “Whomever”

On the subject of "whoever" and "whomever", I was reading this but I am still confused: http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/whoever.asp What is the correct use of whoever/whomever in the following ...
3
votes
3answers
131 views

What's the accusative absolute?

I'm no grammarian and so I am seeking an informal and comprehensible answer. I read the following definition for accusative-absolute, but I don't fully understand it, possibly due to the many ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

wooden, golden, oaken - Genitive?

A few nouns can be transformed into an adjective meaning "made of that noun (also: being like that noun)" by adding -en. golden, wooden, oaken, stonen Are those remnants of an old noun ...
3
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3answers
644 views

“Exchange emails with whomever you want to put me in contact [with]”

I realize the "never end a sentence with a preposition" rule is controversial these days, but let's assume for the sake of argument that it should be followed. What is the proper construction of a ...
3
votes
1answer
417 views

Contemporary written usage of “whom” in objective case [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What's the rule for using “who” or “whom”? I was writing a LinkedIn recommendation one day, and ended up pondering for a while which of these ...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

If a clause is a direct object, its pronoun is nominative because the whole clause is the object

I am sure this has been asked before; I couldn't locate a definite answer (grammar websites on direct objects do not seem to explicitly state the answer). I think it may have been addressed in my ...
3
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5answers
331 views

We, he and I vs. us, him and me

The sentence is, Our Supervisor finally noticed that it was we, Kim and I, who always turn in our reports on time. Should it actually be you and me or you and I?
3
votes
3answers
230 views

Is “It must be him with whom you enjoy doing your assignments, not me” correct? [duplicate]

I’d like all of you to please consider the following sentence: It must be him with whom you enjoy doing your assignments, not me. I have known that after 'to be' verb pronouns words take the ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

Difference between “Let us go” and “Let we go”?

Just wanted to know the correct usage of 'us' and 'we' . Are there any contexts in which they can be used interchangeably? I know "Let we go" seems wrong..but couldn't explain it.
2
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2answers
100 views

Incorrect personal pronoun case in “I Wonder as I Wander”

In the Christmas song "I Wonder as I Wander", the lyrics say: I wonder as I wander out under the sky, How Jesus the Savior did come for to die. For poor on'ry people like you and like I It ...
2
votes
3answers
333 views

When using the preposition “for” should it be followed with the subjective or objective case?

The activity we engaged in was good for she and I. or The activity we engaged in was good for us both. or The activity we engaged in was good for her and me.
2
votes
3answers
243 views

The case of “y'all”

What cases can "y'all" work in? A prior question asks about the 'proper' usage of "y'all", but it and its answers only address nominative case (all examples are nominative). I think that there are ...
2
votes
2answers
826 views

Should I use 'whoever' or 'whomever' here?

I know this sentence is a little awkward. Bear with me. "I will kill whomever I despise." -- This one feels correct. However... "I will kill whoever despises me." -- Is this right? Would this one ...
2
votes
1answer
108 views

“Put me in touch with whomever created it”? [duplicate]

He created it. Put me in touch with him. So which is correct and why: Put me in touch with whomever created it. Put me in touch with whoever created it.
2
votes
2answers
135 views

Finnegan's Wake: “the least successful of whom was…” [closed]

Does the following sentence sound awkward because of the positioning of whom? Beans grew up in a Roman Catholic household with four brothers; the least successful of whom was the bank president.
2
votes
1answer
185 views

Is it correct to say “Me and my friend, we…”?

I know normally to use: "My friend and I went shopping." But what about when we make it into: "My friend and I, we went shopping." It seems to me that in this structure, we could or should ...
2
votes
2answers
79 views

Whom or who in this case? Google thinks who [duplicate]

I was asking someone "whom were you horrible to?" And thought, is it who or whom? I believe it's whom but when I typed the phrase into Google search It felt differently.
2
votes
2answers
268 views

“It is I,” versus, “I am it” [closed]

In predicate nominatives, I was taught that you use the subject pronoun on either side. In other words. All of these sentences therefore sound right: I am it. It is I. You are it. It is you. ...
1
vote
1answer
265 views

Who decides the casing of newly coined words?

We are creating a product which is online hosted CMS solution (something like WordPress), and we want to call it Site Pack. However, there are places where we need to join these words together (like ...
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2answers
1k views

“He is better than _____.” (1) I (2) I am?

Which of the following constructions is / are correct? He is better than I. He is better than I am. PS: I'm unfamiliar with this site and its workings, so forgive me if my question fails to follow ...
1
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1answer
741 views

Differences between Case Frames and Semantic role labeling

I'm learning about some basic linguistics theory and have come across case frame analysis and semantic role labeling as methods of determining agents within sentences, and arguments for verbs. ...
1
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2answers
66 views

“as much as you and I” vs. “as much as you and me”

This was posted on facebook and people are saying it is incorrect, it should be: "...as you and I" Which is correct?
1
vote
1answer
79 views

Comma in cases? (Maths)

In maths we sometimes want to show that a quantity can obtain different values depending on what case we consider. We call this cases. I cannot draw it here for you because LaTeX is not enabled ...
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2answers
408 views

Should a photograph label read “you and I” or “you and me”? [duplicate]

I had a debate with my friend about this topic because he had a photo captioned: Seth and I playing lion king and I said it should be Seth and me playing lion king Which is correct?
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0answers
25 views

Can “that” have a possessive form? [duplicate]

For example: It's a statue that's base is made of gold. The thing is, I'm pretty sure "that's" can only mean "that is" and I don't think I've ever seen "thats."
1
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0answers
49 views

Pronoun Case in Noun Phrases used as Direct Objects [duplicate]

When I have a noun phrase that contains a pronoun as a subject (of the phrase), but the noun phrase is being used as the direct object of another verb, is the pronoun in the nominative case or the ...