The distinctions between subject and object forms of pronouns.

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4answers
1k views

“the growth of he and his sister” in this sentence from the Guardian

Just read this line on the Guardian: He dismantles his bedroom and helps tidy the house, daubing white paint over the pencil marks on the doorframe which have measured the growth of he and his ...
1
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2answers
74 views

Is it acceptable to start an emphatic sentence with “It is he who…”?

It is he who the students choose as the repersentative of their class. Is this sentence grammatically correct? If not, why? I would like to know whether the pronoun ‘he’ can be used in this grammar ...
4
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1answer
113 views

What case do we assign a relativizer representing a subject raised to object?

The basic rule I follow is that the case of the relativizer is determined by the role played within the relative clause by the entity it represents. Give it to [OBJ whomever you admire __ most]. (...
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2answers
197 views

What is the correct grammar: “we” or “us”

What is the correct grammar for this sentence fragment: She needed we the taxpayers to pay.... She needed us the taxpayers to pay.... because without "the taxpayers", the correct sentence ...
0
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1answer
59 views

“Being [he/him] is not easy.” Which is prescriptively “correct”?

The prescriptivist rule for "It is I" is well known This question is about prescriptive grammar. It’s a fairly well-known prescriptivist rule that “me, him, her, them” (in other words, pronouns in ...
22
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4answers
44k views

Which is correct: “This is her” or “This is she”? [closed]

Upon answering the telephone, the person calling asks if Joan is available. If Joan is the person who answered the phone, should she say "This is her" or "This is she"?
110
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9answers
20k views

What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?

I can never figure out whether I should use who and whom. Most people use who for both colloquially, but that’s not correct. What’s the rule for using who and whom correctly?
5
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4answers
336 views

‘Who/whom’ vs. ‘he/him’: how to figure out which to use

The accepted (and highly upvoted) answer to the question in the question What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly? states that the easiest way to find out whether to use who or whom is to ...
14
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4answers
173k views

“With who” vs. “with whom”

Is this correct? The person with whom I'm doing the project should be here soon. If it is, is with always a dative preposition (like mit in German)?
4
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4answers
2k views

Should I use 'whoever' or 'whomever': “I will kill ___ despises me.” ?

I know this sentence is a little awkward. Bear with me. "I will kill whomever I despise." -- This one feels correct. However... "I will kill whoever despises me." -- Is this right? Would this one ...
2
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3answers
73 views

Would pronouns be objective or subjective in this sentence?

Sentence: John's entire plan was nothing more than him/he and me/I walking by his neighbors' houses armed with twenty-eight inches of potentially bone-crushing sports equipment. Should I ...
1
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1answer
47 views

What is the case of job in “She faxed her application for a new job”?

She faxed her application for a new job. In this sentence, 'she' and 'application' are in the nominative case and accusative case respectively. But what is the case of 'job'?
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2answers
526 views

It was he … / It was him [duplicate]

It was he who messed up everything. It was him who messed up everything. What is the difference between these two sentences?
0
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1answer
82 views

“I am only me” vs. “I am only I”

Is it more correct to say "I am only me" or "I am only I?" I know that the subject should follow a linking verb like "am" or "is", e.g.: "It is I", but "It is me" is also correct by common educated ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Is it correct to say “Me and my friend, we…”?

I know normally to use: "My friend and I went shopping." But what about when we make it into: "My friend and I, we went shopping." It seems to me that in this structure, we could or should ...
8
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2answers
28k views

“Me and my wife” or “my wife and me”

Which is correct: me and my wife or my wife and me? The sentence in which this is used is Ms. Smith informed me and my wife that she was afraid of being accosted.
0
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2answers
202 views

'Not' followed by 'as was the case of' is possible?

I'm wondering if the phrase Not as was the case of [...] is possible. For making it clear, the synonym is "Not like the case of ...".
12
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5answers
3k views

Thank thou or Thank thee

How would Shakespeare have said "Thank you"? Can't decide if it is thee or thou, since it isn't really a sentence.
0
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0answers
21 views

“That would be I” or “That would be me”? [duplicate]

I had a discussion with a teacher this morning and am seeking confirmation. Is it correct to say: That would be I. ... or is it better to say: That would be me. Are they both ...
0
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0answers
116 views

Interested in him learning French - with accusative 'him' [duplicate]

Good morning everyone! Is it correct to say " I' m interested in him learning French in the future"?
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2answers
6k views

“Ask me anything” and “Ask anything to me”

There are some sentences I hear regularly: Ask me anything Ask anything to me. If you ask me whether he was right, I would tell you "No". If you ask me about whether he was right, .... ...
10
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2answers
132 views

Declined Latin nouns in English prose

In German it was customary to decline Latin words used in German prose. One might, for instance, speak of performing a reductionem ad absurdum, using the the accusative form of the word reductio when ...
1
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1answer
32 views

How should proper nouns using stylized case (e.g.: ownCloud) be treated in formal writing? [duplicate]

Many companies are now using stylized case for their names. When writing formal documents, how should these names be written? Assuming that the case they've chosen should be honored, how should they ...
0
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3answers
74 views

The case of an object of a preposition

I have the following sentence: "The swimmer next to Cavic arrives just before he." My question is why can't we write "The swimmer next to Cavic arrives just before him"? Isn't "just before..." an ...
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2answers
70 views

let alone he or let alone him

Should I say 'he' or 'him' in the following situation? Even I am not going, let alone he. Even I am not going, let alone him.
5
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4answers
835 views

In “Enter John”, is John in the nominative or accusative case?

This question made me think about the structure of the sentence. I'm familiar with the expression 'Enter Michael'/'Exit John' to represent Michael's or John's entry or exit, respectively, to a ...
0
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0answers
19 views

Genitive case in a sentence where two proper nouns are used [duplicate]

Which of the two sentences is correct: Ion's and Zoe's daughter is at home. or Ion and Zoe's daughter is at home
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0answers
50 views

In this sentence is it “you and me” or “you and I”? [duplicate]

I tried reading online articles about this but I'm still not understanding when it is correct. The sentence: "Logic is not for people like you and me." Is this accurate and in which ...
2
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3answers
562 views

“as much as you and I” vs. “as much as you and me” [duplicate]

This was posted on facebook and people are saying it is incorrect, it should be: "...as you and I" Which is correct?
4
votes
2answers
104 views

Passive voice, agency, and survey format

I'm designing an opinion survey and one of the factors I am thinking of manipulating is the way the question is phrased. Specifically, I'm thinking of contrasting the following two item phrasings: 1) ...
3
votes
4answers
535 views

Why do we ask “Who is she?” in the subjective form? [closed]

If "her" is objective and "she" is subjective, why do we say: 'Who is she?' instead of: 'Who is her?' apart from the latter sounding a bit strange? For instance: 'That car belongs to ...
0
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3answers
138 views

Genitive case in: “The three Wise Men's Day”

Is it correct to use the genitive case in: "The three Wise Men's Day"? Thank you!
0
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0answers
45 views

Case of website names in written communication

What is the appropriate way to write the names of websites in written communication? If I treat them as the proper nouns that they are, I should write something like, "On the website Wordpress....
2
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6answers
6k views

Difference between “Let us go” and “Let we go”?

Just wanted to know the correct usage of 'us' and 'we' . Are there any contexts in which they can be used interchangeably? I know "Let we go" seems wrong..but couldn't explain it.
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1answer
219 views

Case of “it”: “Be it ever so humble”

As you know, there's a saying going: Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home. I'm having difficulty in identifying the case of it in the sentence. Here are reasons why. Be it ever so ...
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0answers
22 views

Why isn't the nominative case generally used with “to be”? [duplicate]

In German, constructions with sein, which is uninflected infinitive meaning "to me", seem to generally use the nominative case. For instance, this is a dog translates to das ist ein Hund, and ein here ...
0
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1answer
123 views

Can object of a clause be the subject of other clause?

Please, help me to get rid from following problems: 1) He proposed to her, who had requited his love from the moment they met. 2) She, whom he had met only two weeks before, thought his proposal ...
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1answer
334 views

It wasn't someone or I vs. It wasn't me or someone (usage in denial statement) [duplicate]

If one was to state that neither him or another person committed a certain act, how would that be phrased with proper grammar? ex. Who broke that window? It wasn't me or Steve. vs. It wasn't Steve ...
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3answers
109 views

Why should a copula link two noun phrases of the same case?

http://english.stackexchange.com/a/30392/50720 motivated this question: To quote from the clear explanation: The rule for what [Fowler] and others consider technically right is ... that "...
0
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1answer
181 views

Which one is correct: I, I am, or me? [duplicate]

I am in a little bit confusion here. I was going through a blog article and I read He is more intelligent than me. I think it is incorrect. It should have been He is more intelligent ...
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2answers
400 views

How to remember the 6 most common grammatical cases?

I heed the etymological fallacy, but how can I connect the etymology to cases' meanings or rationalise/make sense of these esoteric words? I'm always confused as to which is which, and I need to ...
11
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4answers
2k views

Is “her” a possessive or an objective pronoun in “A mother takes care of her children”?

I had a sort of debate with my teacher to whether the her in the sentence A mother takes care of her children. is a possessive or an objective pronoun. I told my teacher that it was a possesive ...
0
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1answer
295 views

“None of who’s” vs. “none of whose” [closed]

Is the following phrase grammatical? I seem to recall three people, none of who's names I can remember.
22
votes
5answers
5k views

Why do we use the object instead of the subject pronoun in constructions like “stupid me”?

I'm trying to find out how come we say lucky me and stupid us rather than lucky I and stupid we. My understanding is that this is not a recent invention, but a relic from the distant past where it was ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

fare thee well - grammar

Why is this sentence using 'thee' (which is, afaik the oblique case) and not 'thou'? The second person singular -in this case- should be the subject, i thought. The subject is the one doing the ...
3
votes
1answer
295 views

Is this use of “whom” correct? Can I use “who” here instead?

I want to shorten this: I sent emails to four others. One person responded. Does the following sentence correctly use whom to achieve my goal? I sent emails to four others, one of whom ...
0
votes
1answer
770 views

Why “all of us” instead of “all of we”? [closed]

When using the construction "all of us" as a subject in a sentence, the pronoun stays an object pronoun, as such: All of us are in the same boat. The alternate construction just sounds weird (to ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Proper use of I vs me [duplicate]

I stated the following: Angela was reading to Frank and I. Someone corrected me, stating "Frank and me" Which is right?
3
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3answers
948 views

“Me” versus “I”

He was almost as bad at English as me. He was almost as bad at English as I. The first one sounds better as-is, but not when you change the second one to He was almost as bad at English as I was. ...