The distinctions between subject and object forms of pronouns.

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50 views

'Not' followed by 'as was the case of' is possible?

I'm wondering if the phrase Not as was the case of [...] is possible. For making it clear, the synonym is "Not like the case of ...".
3
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4answers
201 views

Why do we ask “Who is she?” in the subjective form? [closed]

If "her" is objective and "she" is subjective, why do we say: 'Who is she?' instead of: 'Who is her?' apart from the latter sounding a bit strange? For instance: 'That car belongs to ...
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3answers
88 views

Genitive case in: “The three Wise Men's Day”

Is it correct to use the genitive case in: "The three Wise Men's Day"? Thank you!
5
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4answers
147 views

‘Who/whom’ vs. ‘he/him’: how to figure out which to use

The accepted (and highly upvoted) answer to the question in the question What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly? states that the easiest way to find out whether to use who or whom is to ...
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0answers
32 views

Case of website names in written communication

What is the appropriate way to write the names of websites in written communication? If I treat them as the proper nouns that they are, I should write something like, "On the website ...
2
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6answers
4k views

Difference between “Let us go” and “Let we go”?

Just wanted to know the correct usage of 'us' and 'we' . Are there any contexts in which they can be used interchangeably? I know "Let we go" seems wrong..but couldn't explain it.
1
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1answer
35 views

Case of “it”: “Be it ever so humble”

As you know, there's a saying going: Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home. I'm having difficulty in identifying the case of it in the sentence. Here are reasons why. Be it ever so ...
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0answers
19 views

Why isn't the nominative case generally used with “to be”? [duplicate]

In German, constructions with sein, which is uninflected infinitive meaning "to me", seem to generally use the nominative case. For instance, this is a dog translates to das ist ein Hund, and ein here ...
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1answer
76 views

Can object of a clause be the subject of other clause?

Please, help me to get rid from following problems: 1) He proposed to her, who had requited his love from the moment they met. 2) She, whom he had met only two weeks before, thought his proposal ...
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1answer
57 views

It wasn't someone or I vs. It wasn't me or someone (usage in denial statement) [duplicate]

If one was to state that neither him or another person committed a certain act, how would that be phrased with proper grammar? ex. Who broke that window? It wasn't me or Steve. vs. It wasn't Steve ...
91
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7answers
14k views

What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?

I can never figure out whether I should use who and whom. Most people use who for both colloquially, but that’s not correct. What’s the rule for using who and whom correctly?
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3answers
83 views

Why should a copula link two noun phrases of the same case?

http://english.stackexchange.com/a/30392/50720 motivated this question: To quote from the clear explanation: The rule for what [Fowler] and others consider technically right is ... that ...
0
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1answer
82 views

Which one is correct: I, I am, or me? [duplicate]

I am in a little bit confusion here. I was going through a blog article and I read He is more intelligent than me. I think it is incorrect. It should have been He is more intelligent ...
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2answers
200 views

How to remember the 6 most common grammatical cases?

I heed the etymological fallacy, but how can I connect the etymology to cases' meanings or rationalise/make sense of these esoteric words? I'm always confused as to which is which, and I need to ...
11
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4answers
983 views

Is “her” a possessive or an objective pronoun in “A mother takes care of her children”?

I had a sort of debate with my teacher to whether the her in the sentence A mother takes care of her children. is a possessive or an objective pronoun. I told my teacher that it was a possesive ...
0
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1answer
167 views

“None of who’s” vs. “none of whose” [closed]

Is the following phrase grammatical? I seem to recall three people, none of who's names I can remember.
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5answers
4k views

Why do we use the object instead of the subject pronoun in constructions like “stupid me”?

I'm trying to find out how come we say lucky me and stupid us rather than lucky I and stupid we. My understanding is that this is not a recent invention, but a relic from the distant past where it was ...
2
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1answer
66 views

fare thee well - grammar

Why is this sentence using 'thee' (which is, afaik the oblique case) and not 'thou'? The second person singular -in this case- should be the subject, i thought. The subject is the one doing the ...
3
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1answer
172 views

Is this use of “whom” correct? Can I use “who” here instead?

I want to shorten this: I sent emails to four others. One person responded. Does the following sentence correctly use whom to achieve my goal? I sent emails to four others, one of whom ...
8
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2answers
17k views

“Me and my wife” or “my wife and me”

Which is correct: me and my wife or my wife and me? The sentence in which this is used is Ms. Smith informed me and my wife that she was afraid of being accosted.
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1answer
174 views

Why “all of us” instead of “all of we”? [closed]

When using the construction "all of us" as a subject in a sentence, the pronoun stays an object pronoun, as such: All of us are in the same boat. The alternate construction just sounds weird (to ...
3
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1answer
588 views

Proper use of I vs me [duplicate]

I stated the following: Angela was reading to Frank and I. Someone corrected me, stating "Frank and me" Which is right?
3
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3answers
746 views

“Me” versus “I”

He was almost as bad at English as me. He was almost as bad at English as I. The first one sounds better as-is, but not when you change the second one to He was almost as bad at English as I was. ...
2
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1answer
158 views

Me, myself, or I?

a) I am surprised that someone other than I had a cat named Hamlet. or b) I am surprised that someone other than myself had a cat named Hamlet. or c) I am surprised that someone ...
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3answers
376 views

Which one is correct: “The friend who I met is cute” or “The friend whom I met is cute”? [duplicate]

Or maybe both are correct? I would be inclined to think that 'whom' is correct, because its case is in sync with the verb 'met'. I know that in the languages with developed cases (like Russian), only ...
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3answers
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Which is grammatically correct: “Let he who…” or “Let him who…”

Let he who believes in this prophet speak now what he knows. Let him who believes in this prophet speak now what he knows.
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1answer
32 views

“The new guys are dressed a lot nicer than we/us” [duplicate]

Does anyone know the correct word choice between "we" and "us", and explain the reason why? Thanks!
3
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3answers
279 views

What's the accusative absolute?

I'm no grammarian and so I am seeking an informal and comprehensible answer. I read the following definition for accusative-absolute, but I don't fully understand it, possibly due to the many ...
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2answers
232 views

similar to & the same as [duplicate]

Why don't we use " 's "(possessive S) in the first sentence as in the second one? I have the same color eyes as my father. My personality is very similar to my father's. Can we use "my ...
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2answers
189 views

“as much as you and I” vs. “as much as you and me”

This was posted on facebook and people are saying it is incorrect, it should be: "...as you and I" Which is correct?
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2answers
183 views

Why does binomial nomenclature seem to break case rules?

According to the Wiki page for binomial nomenclature, we are supposed to capitalize the first word when naming species regardless of where it occurs in the sentence. To me, this seem very incongruous ...
8
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3answers
108k views

“With who” vs. “with whom”

Is this correct? The person with whom I'm doing the project should be here soon. If it is, is with always a dative preposition (like mit in German)?
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0answers
46 views

case: 'my' or 'me'? [duplicate]

Thank you baby for my being able to share this with you or Thank you baby for me being able to share this with you Which is correct?
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5answers
219 views

“A threat to us people” or “a threat to we people”? [closed]

Which of these is correct: Global warming is a great threat to us people. Global warming is a great threat to we people.
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2answers
2k views

“I and Jane” or “me and Jane”?

So I know that it's correct to say: Jane and I are going shopping I shouldn't use me here because (as stated on Oxford Dictionaries Online) I is what I would use in the singular form of the ...
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1answer
247 views

As/so sth as: subjective or objective pronoun?

Which of the following is the correct grammar usage? We scored as many runs as they. We scored as many runs as them? Wren and Martin says nothing about this case. Please explain the rule ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Is it correct to say “Me and my friend, we…”?

I know normally to use: "My friend and I went shopping." But what about when we make it into: "My friend and I, we went shopping." It seems to me that in this structure, we could or should ...
3
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1answer
668 views

If a clause is a direct object, its pronoun is nominative because the whole clause is the object

I am sure this has been asked before; I couldn't locate a definite answer (grammar websites on direct objects do not seem to explicitly state the answer). I think it may have been addressed in my ...
2
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1answer
488 views

“Put me in touch with whomever created it”? [duplicate]

He created it. Put me in touch with him. So which is correct and why: Put me in touch with whomever created it. Put me in touch with whoever created it.
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0answers
49 views

Pronoun Case in Noun Phrases used as Direct Objects [duplicate]

When I have a noun phrase that contains a pronoun as a subject (of the phrase), but the noun phrase is being used as the direct object of another verb, is the pronoun in the nominative case or the ...
0
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2answers
266 views

“Whomever runs it's” or “whomever runs its”?

I know that "its" is the possessive form of "it", but does this rule apply to the possessive form of phrases ending in "it"? Should I say, "the program runs on whomever runs its computer" or "the ...
3
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1answer
2k views

“Whoever” Vs. “Whomever”

On the subject of "whoever" and "whomever", I was reading this but I am still confused: http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/whoever.asp What is the correct use of whoever/whomever in the following ...
5
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1answer
220 views

Is this use of whomever correct?

I take pride in my ability to deliver a warm and friendly welcome to whomever I meet. My reasoning is that I am doing the meeting and the object is merely being met, hence whomever.
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2answers
1k views

Should I use 'whoever' or 'whomever' here?

I know this sentence is a little awkward. Bear with me. "I will kill whomever I despise." -- This one feels correct. However... "I will kill whoever despises me." -- Is this right? Would this one ...
3
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3answers
800 views

“Exchange emails with whomever you want to put me in contact [with]”

I realize the "never end a sentence with a preposition" rule is controversial these days, but let's assume for the sake of argument that it should be followed. What is the proper construction of a ...
6
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2answers
399 views

Subject vs. Object marking for whoever?

I know similar questions have been asked before, but I'm having trouble reconciling the following sentence, received in an email: Can we ask whomever is your contact there to email us a job so we ...
2
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2answers
150 views

Whom or who in this case? Google thinks who [duplicate]

I was asking someone "whom were you horrible to?" And thought, is it who or whom? I believe it's whom but when I typed the phrase into Google search It felt differently.
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5answers
965 views

We, he and I vs. us, him and me

The sentence is, Our Supervisor finally noticed that it was we, Kim and I, who always turn in our reports on time. Should it actually be you and me or you and I?
8
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1answer
617 views

Does “In the event of …” take the genitive case?

Is insisting on a genitive pronoun after "In the event of ..." pedantry or correct? For example: "In the event of ..." his/him winning the election my/me dying our/us leaving For those who ...
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0answers
54 views

“Me neither” - why oblique case? [duplicate]

I don't like white wine. Me neither. We're talking about subjects here, so naturally the pronoun should be "I". The use of "me" would only make sense to me if "neither" was a postposition. ...