The distinctions between subject and object forms of pronouns.

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439 views

Should a photograph label read “you and I” or “you and me”? [duplicate]

I had a debate with my friend about this topic because he had a photo captioned: Seth and I playing lion king and I said it should be Seth and me playing lion king Which is correct?
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25 views

Can “that” have a possessive form? [duplicate]

For example: It's a statue that's base is made of gold. The thing is, I'm pretty sure "that's" can only mean "that is" and I don't think I've ever seen "thats."
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49 views

Pronoun Case in Noun Phrases used as Direct Objects [duplicate]

When I have a noun phrase that contains a pronoun as a subject (of the phrase), but the noun phrase is being used as the direct object of another verb, is the pronoun in the nominative case or the ...
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2answers
506 views

“You and ME” Versus “YOU and I” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”? “Me and my wife” or “my wife and me” Is this sentence correct "All I ...
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0answers
149 views

Who vs. Whom for: “…Satan, who/whom everyone imagines with horns.” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: What is the correct usage of “whom”? Using “who” and “whom” I'm not sure what the clause is called, but it usually describes ...
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1answer
25 views

“The new guys are dressed a lot nicer than we/us” [duplicate]

Does anyone know the correct word choice between "we" and "us", and explain the reason why? Thanks!
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2answers
1k views

“Ask me anything” and “Ask anything to me”

There are some sentences I hear regularly: Ask me anything Ask anything to me. If you ask me whether he was right, I would tell you "No". If you ask me about whether he was right, .... ...
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1answer
358 views

Is English changing to make “Jack told Jill and *I* to walk faster” acceptable? [duplicate]

Consider: Jack told Jill and I to walk faster. instead of Jack told Jill and me to walk faster. This “mistake” seems to be becoming more and more common, even among TV newscasters or ...
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2answers
230 views

“I and Jane” or “me and Jane”?

So I know that it's correct to say: Jane and I are going shopping I shouldn't use me here because (as stated on Oxford Dictionaries Online) I is what I would use in the singular form of the ...
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2answers
174 views

“Whomever runs it's” or “whomever runs its”?

I know that "its" is the possessive form of "it", but does this rule apply to the possessive form of phrases ending in "it"? Should I say, "the program runs on whomever runs its computer" or "the ...
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2answers
126 views

Why does binomial nomenclature seem to break case rules?

According to the Wiki page for binomial nomenclature, we are supposed to capitalize the first word when naming species regardless of where it occurs in the sentence. To me, this seem very incongruous ...
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2answers
86 views

Case of Pronoun [duplicate]

I want to know _ you talked to. (who or whom) I want to know _ the culprit is. (who or whom)
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1answer
145 views

Issues with predicate nominative

As far as my understanding goes, English does have a predicate nominative for the copula to be as well as semantically related words (to become, to seem) if the entity in question plays the role of ...
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1answer
69 views

Which tense should be used in troubleshooting cases, simple present or simple past?

Which tense should be used in troubleshooting cases, simple present or simple past? I've seen examples where simple present is used. But what if a specific date is provided in the case. For example: ...
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1answer
188 views

Correct Question word: Who or whom? [duplicate]

I'm wondering which option is the right one: Who is he having lunch with? Whom is he having lunch with?
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2answers
68 views

similar to & the same as [duplicate]

Why don't we use " 's "(possessive S) in the first sentence as in the second one? I have the same color eyes as my father. My personality is very similar to my father's. Can we use "my ...
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1answer
86 views

More issues with the predicate nominative

In comparison to German, English is very "situational" with its predicate nominative (see this question). Suppose the rule is that the predicate nominative is only ever applied for sentences like the ...
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1answer
186 views

Why is the accusative case used for a “topic”?

If I were to write a book about myself, Me would be a more natural-sounding title than I. Also, we say the us-vs.-them mentality instead of the we-vs.-they mentality.
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45 views

case: 'my' or 'me'? [duplicate]

Thank you baby for my being able to share this with you or Thank you baby for me being able to share this with you Which is correct?
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53 views

“Me neither” - why oblique case? [duplicate]

I don't like white wine. Me neither. We're talking about subjects here, so naturally the pronoun should be "I". The use of "me" would only make sense to me if "neither" was a postposition. ...
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1answer
428 views

Using nominative “I” instead of objective “me” in plural phrases [duplicate]

I hear people saying, "He said it to my wife and I" when they would never say, "He said it to I." Why are people so inconsistent?
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53 views

“Taller than me” or “taller than I”? [duplicate]

Which one is correct here and why? He is taller than me. He is taller than I.
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3answers
63 views

Which one is correct: “The friend who I met is cute” or “The friend whom I met is cute”? [duplicate]

Or maybe both are correct? I would be inclined to think that 'whom' is correct, because its case is in sync with the verb 'met'. I know that in the languages with developed cases (like Russian), only ...
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1answer
133 views

Usage of both apostrophe and “of” together [duplicate]

I was reading Agatha Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd and noticed following sentence: About those boots of Ralph Paton’s. It is really in old (old as in early or mid twentieth century) ...
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1answer
149 views

As/so sth as: subjective or objective pronoun?

Which of the following is the correct grammar usage? We scored as many runs as they. We scored as many runs as them? Wren and Martin says nothing about this case. Please explain the rule ...
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0answers
41 views

Use of “me” vs. “I” in comparisons [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he? I was using this sentence with an ease until my teacher scolded that this is wrong. He said to use I in place of me as ...
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2answers
5k views

“Be them” or “be they”? [closed]

Which of the following is grammatical? He had lollies be they red or blue? He had lollies be them red or blue? It seems as if it could be them as an object of be.