9
votes
1answer
161 views

Does “In the event of …” take the genitive case?

Is insisting on a genitive pronoun after "In the event of ..." pedantry or correct? For example: "In the event of ..." his/him winning the election my/me dying our/us leaving For those who ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

“Me neither” - why oblique case?

I don't like white wine. Me neither. We're talking about subjects here, so naturally the pronoun should be "I". The use of "me" would only make sense to me if "neither" was a postposition. ...
0
votes
1answer
112 views

Issues with predicate nominative

As far as my understanding goes, English does have a predicate nominative for the copula to be as well as semantically related words (to become, to seem) if the entity in question plays the role of ...
0
votes
1answer
249 views

Is English changing to make “Jack told Jill and *I* to walk faster” acceptable? [duplicate]

Consider: Jack told Jill and I to walk faster. instead of Jack told Jill and me to walk faster. This “mistake” seems to be becoming more and more common, even among TV newscasters or ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Should I capitalize the word 'Web' in this sentence?

A dedicated web server may be required, depending on XXX, YYY, ZZZ, and the total number of concurrent Web users Thanks!
1
vote
2answers
344 views

Should a photograph label read “you and I” or “you and me”? [duplicate]

I had a debate with my friend about this topic because he had a photo captioned: Seth and I playing lion king and I said it should be Seth and me playing lion king Which is correct?
3
votes
1answer
1k views

“Whoever” Vs. “Whomever”

On the subject of "whoever" and "whomever", I was reading this but I am still confused: http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/whoever.asp What is the correct use of whoever/whomever in the following ...
6
votes
3answers
431 views

In “Enter John”, is John in the nominative or accusative case?

This question made me think about the structure of the sentence. I'm familiar with the expression 'Enter Michael'/'Exit John' to represent Michael's or John's entry or exit, respectively, to a ...
6
votes
3answers
600 views

Which grammatical case is “him” in “I help him”, and why?

In languages which distinguish the accusative and dative cases, it is clear from the actual usage whether a divalent verb takes a direct or indirect object. For example, the German eat takes a direct ...
13
votes
5answers
2k views

Is it correct to say that English has the dative case?

Is it correct to say that, nowadays, English has the dative case, or was it only present in Old English?
15
votes
5answers
2k views

Why do we use the object instead of the subject pronoun in constructions like “stupid me”?

I'm trying to find out how come we say lucky me and stupid us rather than lucky I and stupid we. My understanding is that this is not a recent invention, but a relic from the distant past where it was ...