The distinctions between subject and object forms of pronouns.

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How should proper nouns using stylized case (e.g.: ownCloud) be treated in formal writing?

Many companies are now using stylized case for their names. When writing formal documents, how should these names be written? Assuming that the case they've chosen should be honored, how should they ...
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1answer
36 views
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3answers
49 views

The case of an object of a preposition

I have the following sentence: "The swimmer next to Cavic arrives just before he." My question is why can't we write "The swimmer next to Cavic arrives just before him"? Isn't "just before..." an ...
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2answers
50 views

let alone he or let alone him

Should I say 'he' or 'him' in the following situation? Even I am not going, let alone he. Even I am not going, let alone him.
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0answers
18 views

Genitive case in a sentence where two proper nouns are used [duplicate]

Which of the two sentences is correct: Ion's and Zoe's daughter is at home. or Ion and Zoe's daughter is at home
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0answers
49 views

In this sentence is it “you and me” or “you and I”? [duplicate]

I tried reading online articles about this but I'm still not understanding when it is correct. The sentence: "Logic is not for people like you and me." Is this accurate and in which ...
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2answers
45 views

Passive voice, agency, and survey format

I'm designing an opinion survey and one of the factors I am thinking of manipulating is the way the question is phrased. Specifically, I'm thinking of contrasting the following two item phrasings: 1) ...
3
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4answers
227 views

Why do we ask “Who is she?” in the subjective form? [closed]

If "her" is objective and "she" is subjective, why do we say: 'Who is she?' instead of: 'Who is her?' apart from the latter sounding a bit strange? For instance: 'That car belongs to ...
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4answers
171 views

‘Who/whom’ vs. ‘he/him’: how to figure out which to use

The accepted (and highly upvoted) answer to the question in the question What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly? states that the easiest way to find out whether to use who or whom is to ...
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36 views

Case of website names in written communication

What is the appropriate way to write the names of websites in written communication? If I treat them as the proper nouns that they are, I should write something like, "On the website ...
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1answer
76 views

'Not' followed by 'as was the case of' is possible?

I'm wondering if the phrase Not as was the case of [...] is possible. For making it clear, the synonym is "Not like the case of ...".
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1answer
44 views

Case of “it”: “Be it ever so humble”

As you know, there's a saying going: Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home. I'm having difficulty in identifying the case of it in the sentence. Here are reasons why. Be it ever so ...
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0answers
20 views

Why isn't the nominative case generally used with “to be”? [duplicate]

In German, constructions with sein, which is uninflected infinitive meaning "to me", seem to generally use the nominative case. For instance, this is a dog translates to das ist ein Hund, and ein here ...
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1answer
89 views

It wasn't someone or I vs. It wasn't me or someone (usage in denial statement) [duplicate]

If one was to state that neither him or another person committed a certain act, how would that be phrased with proper grammar? ex. Who broke that window? It wasn't me or Steve. vs. It wasn't Steve ...
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1answer
88 views

Can object of a clause be the subject of other clause?

Please, help me to get rid from following problems: 1) He proposed to her, who had requited his love from the moment they met. 2) She, whom he had met only two weeks before, thought his proposal ...
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1answer
96 views

Which one is correct: I, I am, or me? [duplicate]

I am in a little bit confusion here. I was going through a blog article and I read He is more intelligent than me. I think it is incorrect. It should have been He is more intelligent ...
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4answers
1k views

Is “her” a possessive or an objective pronoun in “A mother takes care of her children”?

I had a sort of debate with my teacher to whether the her in the sentence A mother takes care of her children. is a possessive or an objective pronoun. I told my teacher that it was a possesive ...
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1answer
177 views

“None of who’s” vs. “none of whose” [closed]

Is the following phrase grammatical? I seem to recall three people, none of who's names I can remember.
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3answers
94 views

Why should a copula link two noun phrases of the same case?

http://english.stackexchange.com/a/30392/50720 motivated this question: To quote from the clear explanation: The rule for what [Fowler] and others consider technically right is ... that ...
2
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1answer
71 views

fare thee well - grammar

Why is this sentence using 'thee' (which is, afaik the oblique case) and not 'thou'? The second person singular -in this case- should be the subject, i thought. The subject is the one doing the ...
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3answers
99 views

Genitive case in: “The three Wise Men's Day”

Is it correct to use the genitive case in: "The three Wise Men's Day"? Thank you!
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1answer
198 views

Is this use of “whom” correct? Can I use “who” here instead?

I want to shorten this: I sent emails to four others. One person responded. Does the following sentence correctly use whom to achieve my goal? I sent emails to four others, one of whom ...
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2answers
236 views

How to remember the 6 most common grammatical cases?

I heed the etymological fallacy, but how can I connect the etymology to cases' meanings or rationalise/make sense of these esoteric words? I'm always confused as to which is which, and I need to ...
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1answer
220 views

Why “all of us” instead of “all of we”? [closed]

When using the construction "all of us" as a subject in a sentence, the pronoun stays an object pronoun, as such: All of us are in the same boat. The alternate construction just sounds weird (to ...
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1answer
98 views

Interested in him learning French - with accusative 'him' [duplicate]

Good morning everyone! Is it correct to say " I' m interested in him learning French in the future"?
3
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1answer
771 views

Proper use of I vs me [duplicate]

I stated the following: Angela was reading to Frank and I. Someone corrected me, stating "Frank and me" Which is right?
2
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1answer
188 views

Me, myself, or I?

a) I am surprised that someone other than I had a cat named Hamlet. or b) I am surprised that someone other than myself had a cat named Hamlet. or c) I am surprised that someone ...
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3answers
499 views

Which one is correct: “The friend who I met is cute” or “The friend whom I met is cute”? [duplicate]

Or maybe both are correct? I would be inclined to think that 'whom' is correct, because its case is in sync with the verb 'met'. I know that in the languages with developed cases (like Russian), only ...
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1answer
35 views

“The new guys are dressed a lot nicer than we/us” [duplicate]

Does anyone know the correct word choice between "we" and "us", and explain the reason why? Thanks!
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2answers
281 views

similar to & the same as [duplicate]

Why don't we use " 's "(possessive S) in the first sentence as in the second one? I have the same color eyes as my father. My personality is very similar to my father's. Can we use "my ...
2
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3answers
256 views

“as much as you and I” vs. “as much as you and me” [duplicate]

This was posted on facebook and people are saying it is incorrect, it should be: "...as you and I" Which is correct?
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2answers
188 views

Why does binomial nomenclature seem to break case rules?

According to the Wiki page for binomial nomenclature, we are supposed to capitalize the first word when naming species regardless of where it occurs in the sentence. To me, this seem very incongruous ...
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46 views

case: 'my' or 'me'? [duplicate]

Thank you baby for my being able to share this with you or Thank you baby for me being able to share this with you Which is correct?
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3answers
322 views

What's the accusative absolute?

I'm no grammarian and so I am seeking an informal and comprehensible answer. I read the following definition for accusative-absolute, but I don't fully understand it, possibly due to the many ...
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5answers
283 views

“A threat to us people” or “a threat to we people”? [closed]

Which of these is correct: Global warming is a great threat to us people. Global warming is a great threat to we people.
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2k views

“I and Jane” or “me and Jane”?

So I know that it's correct to say: Jane and I are going shopping I shouldn't use me here because (as stated on Oxford Dictionaries Online) I is what I would use in the singular form of the ...
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1answer
2k views

Is it correct to say “Me and my friend, we…”?

I know normally to use: "My friend and I went shopping." But what about when we make it into: "My friend and I, we went shopping." It seems to me that in this structure, we could or should ...
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1answer
729 views

If a clause is a direct object, its pronoun is nominative because the whole clause is the object

I am sure this has been asked before; I couldn't locate a definite answer (grammar websites on direct objects do not seem to explicitly state the answer). I think it may have been addressed in my ...
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1answer
588 views

“Put me in touch with whomever created it”? [duplicate]

He created it. Put me in touch with him. So which is correct and why: Put me in touch with whomever created it. Put me in touch with whoever created it.
2
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2answers
164 views

Whom or who in this case? Google thinks who [duplicate]

I was asking someone "whom were you horrible to?" And thought, is it who or whom? I believe it's whom but when I typed the phrase into Google search It felt differently.
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1answer
674 views

Does “In the event of …” take the genitive case?

Is insisting on a genitive pronoun after "In the event of ..." pedantry or correct? For example: "In the event of ..." his/him winning the election my/me dying our/us leaving For those who ...
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260 views

As/so sth as: subjective or objective pronoun?

Which of the following is the correct grammar usage? We scored as many runs as they. We scored as many runs as them? Wren and Martin says nothing about this case. Please explain the rule ...
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55 views

“Me neither” - why oblique case? [duplicate]

I don't like white wine. Me neither. We're talking about subjects here, so naturally the pronoun should be "I". The use of "me" would only make sense to me if "neither" was a postposition. ...
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0answers
26 views

Can “that” have a possessive form? [duplicate]

For example: It's a statue that's base is made of gold. The thing is, I'm pretty sure "that's" can only mean "that is" and I don't think I've ever seen "thats."
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5answers
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We, he and I vs. us, him and me

The sentence is, Our Supervisor finally noticed that it was we, Kim and I, who always turn in our reports on time. Should it actually be you and me or you and I?
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2answers
163 views

Incorrect personal pronoun case in “I Wonder as I Wander”

In the Christmas song "I Wonder as I Wander", the lyrics say: I wonder as I wander out under the sky, How Jesus the Savior did come for to die. For poor on'ry people like you and like I It ...
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0answers
49 views

Pronoun Case in Noun Phrases used as Direct Objects [duplicate]

When I have a noun phrase that contains a pronoun as a subject (of the phrase), but the noun phrase is being used as the direct object of another verb, is the pronoun in the nominative case or the ...
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4answers
4k views

“That was me” vs. “That was I” [duplicate]

When telling a story about myself from the past, I have found myself in an internal debate over whether the correct way to segue into the present is: That was me twelve years ago. Or: That ...
3
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1answer
134 views

wooden, golden, oaken - Genitive?

A few nouns can be transformed into an adjective meaning "made of that noun (also: being like that noun)" by adding -en. golden, wooden, oaken, stonen Are those remnants of an old noun ...
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108 views

More issues with the predicate nominative

In comparison to German, English is very "situational" with its predicate nominative (see this question). Suppose the rule is that the predicate nominative is only ever applied for sentences like the ...