0
votes
1answer
85 views

How to say “I vaunt a broad knowledge of the subject” without bragging?

How can I say "I vaunt a broad knowledge and understanding of the subject" without sounding too arrogant? The verb to vaunt implies bragging, in my humble opinion.
1
vote
2answers
63 views

“We are pleased to be acknowledged” [closed]

We are pleased to be acknowledged by the most important companies in the field. Is that correct, to mean "many companies respect and acknowledge our work"? Are there better ways to express the ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Economic potential of a company

I would like to say, in business terms, "thanks to the money the company has", meaning they can make investments, I thought of: Thanks to your company's economic potential ?
1
vote
1answer
39 views

local knowledge of the territory

In business language, how could you say: local knowledge of the territory? As in: The company has a deep knowledge of the territory, i.e., logistics, suppliers, clients and people knowledge, etc. ...
-2
votes
4answers
274 views

Alternative word to the new verb “onboard” [closed]

Apparently HR folk have taken to using the word "onboard" as a verb, to be used as a synonym for "bring up to speed", as in: We need to onboard new staff to our dynamic way of thinking. instead ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Difference in usage of terms “company” and “firm”

In a meaning of officially registered and bounded business unit. Like "Microsoft" or "Apple" or "ZARA" or copy shop round the corner. In some books on management/entrepreneurship authors use both ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

How should “The Cloud” be capitalized?

"We are migrating our core systems into (1) The Cloud ... or (2) the cloud ... or (3) the Cloud???" I've googled (Googled?) this and found the usual range of differing opinions but as yet no ...
0
votes
2answers
98 views

Content Performance [closed]

What is a right word to describe Content/Performance? It is about best and effective content that form a complete artefact. The example text as below: 5.4.1 Content/Performance This is about a ...
10
votes
4answers
31k views

Meaning of “reach out to somebody”

The dictionary explains this as: To show somebody that you are interested in them and/or want to help them The explanation indicates the subject of the sentence is the one that offers help, but ...
0
votes
1answer
265 views

Looking for a technical term that goes hand in hand with the strategy used in the joke [closed]

Here's the joke: Tom's Dad:(in Bill Gates's office) My son Tom wants to marry your daughter. Are you interested? Bill: No, my daughter is still too young. Tom's Dad: What if my son is a VP at ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

An alternative to “stakeholder”

Here's a sentence taken from an executive memo, "Action item: get feedback from stakeholders on SuperDongle 9000". Is there something that can replace "stakeholder"? The word is not being used ...
6
votes
6answers
5k views

Why “line of business” applications?

In software, why do we talk about line-of-business applications (sometimes abbreviated to LOB)? Why not just business applications? So it's useful to distinguish between general software (like email ...
6
votes
4answers
3k views

What is a one-person business called?

I'm wondering what is the term for the person, that is doing business on his/her own and has tax liability. It's different in each country, I'd like to know how they are called in USA and UK.
0
votes
2answers
580 views

Why did ‘off-the-shelf' come to mean ‘in stock, ready-made, and easily available’?

I came across the word “off-the-shelf” in the following sentence of Time magazine’s article “The 50 Best Inventions of the Years (Nov.11 issue). He (inventor of the first synthetic cell) started with ...