This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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3
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3answers
231 views

Is “have/has got” a perfect for BrE, but not AmE?

In BrE the past participle of get is in most cases got, while in AmE it is almost always gotten. Does that imply that in the context of BrE "have/has got" is a genuine perfect construction, whereas ...
-2
votes
2answers
201 views

Someone who reads too much into things or over analyses things

Is there a single word for someone who reads too much into things? Examples from the freedictionary: This statement means exactly what it says. Don't try to read anything else into it. ...
3
votes
1answer
5k views

Shalln't vs. Shan't in British English

I am a British English speaker and often use "shall" and "shall not". When I contract "shall not", I pronounce it [ʃɑlnt] -- that is, the "l" sound remains. My question, therefore, is how do I spell ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

Is “a few street away” a grammatically acceptable idiomatic expression in some dialect of UK English?

I am an American and I am reading a book titled Bloodmage by a British author named Stephen Aryan. He uses expressions I was previously unfamiliar with, such as "sat" instead of "sitting" (i.e., "sat ...
2
votes
1answer
74 views

“Having Too Much Feather in His Brain”--H.H. Asquith's Remark About Gen. Sir Ian Hamilton

Prior to Sir Ian Hamilton's appointment by Kitchener as Commander-in-Chief Dardanelles Campaign, P.M. H. H. Asquith said Hamilton 'has too much feather in his brain'. I think it's related to ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

What's a “summer-funeral hit”?

In a YouTube comment commenting on Jamala's song 1944, someone says You guys enjoy your summer-funeral hit! I have nothing else to add. after saying Ukraine should't have won! What a ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

A word to describe taking pleasure in the way a word sounds

What is a word that describes one's satisfaction in the phonetics of a word? Like visual appeal of a pictures, but the audible appeal of a word.
1
vote
1answer
437 views

Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Different-colored or different colored? UK vs US English

Can I write "differently colored" instead? What expression most British or Americans would rather use? "socks, different in color" "socks of different colors" "a different color of each sock"
0
votes
1answer
43 views

“Why has this watch stopped?” Thought Ahmed,

"Why has this watch stopped? " Thought Ahmed, How to change this sentence into Narration? I tried to make its Indirect speech, but I could not change it.
0
votes
1answer
177 views

Help with Plural Objects and Subjects

I know to use 'is' for singular and 'are' for plurals. I was recently listening to a song and it reminded me of a 'rule' a teacher once told me about. The chorus repeats: Line 1: BIG GIRLS CRY WHEN ...
-1
votes
1answer
229 views

A dataset of equivalent English phrases?

There is a similarity or even equality between many sentences in English language such as: I happened to come across the scientific definitions while reading. I came across the scientific ...
-1
votes
1answer
100 views

Uses of “to scathe”

Would “We took down the foreyard and commenced to scathe it” make sense to a sailor?
-1
votes
1answer
3k views

Got started or started

I am a learner of the English language. I have written two sentences, please give your two minutes and let me know, which one is correct? In the following sentences an action was started by my dog, ...
1
vote
0answers
69 views

For how long has “as” been synonymous with “because” in British English?

In British English, it seems that "because" can always be replaced with "as." Here is an example of "as" meaning "because" in British English: I popped down to the shops as we were out of loo ...
1
vote
0answers
73 views

“He could do X for England”. Are there similar expressions in other parts of the English-speaking world to this derogatory sentence?

In Reginald Hill's Dalziel and Pascoe novels, I've read the phrase: "He could [do x] for England. It is always derogatory. It is a lovely phrase! Because I can't put my finger on a quote from these ...
1
vote
0answers
150 views

Rhotic accent in London or in the rest of the UK?

Good evening or good afternoon for the American. I read and it is known that most British accents are non-rhotic, but I’m now in London and I have the feeling that the Rs after vowels and before a ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

grammatical name and grammatical function

the genes of many of those infective agents.what is the grammatical name and grammatical function of the expression?my own answer:noun clause and function adjective noun infective agents.
0
votes
0answers
23 views

The United States. Possesive is its or their?

The United States made no secret of its/their hope to absorb the provinces... http://grammarist.com/usage/united-states/ "Although United States is usually treated as a singular noun, it’s treated ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Word that Resembles The Dutch Word Kudde

Kudde, Couth, is there an english farmers word that resembles Kudde. Kudde means herd, flock, fold, drove, livestock, and bevy. So I'm looking for a word that means something along the lines of ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

x-stor(e)y or x-floor or x-level house/building?

Which is the correct for British English? I need the correct for both a separate house and an apartment building, if this makes difference. I can't find any concrete answer online.
0
votes
0answers
19 views

May “in with” be used to mean “among?”

I was thinking about how little I use the word among and how I would phrase the dictionary's example sentences for it. Most of it involved substitution with the word with. Then I noticed something. ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Creating a word for a child of a parent-word

I have a word for example, Scope, that I'd like to make a child word for the same thing, I thought "ette" as a suffix would be appropriate. A Scope of a Scope would be a Scopelette, for example. ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Where in the world is the term 'flatmate' used?

Here in New Zealand the term 'flatmate' is the most commonly used term to refer to the people who share a rented living arrangement, much the same way that Americans would use 'roommate'. According ...
0
votes
0answers
136 views

I wouldn't vs I'd not

I'm defending my word choice to an editor in a novel I've written. There are two points of view: one is a native Irish speaker, and the other, an American born and raised here. They're both eighteen. ...
0
votes
0answers
63 views

Unnamed vs Nameless

I've scouted around and found that: Unnamed defined is "not having being given a name" Nameless defined is "not having a name / unknown as to what the name is My main question is what is the term ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Using status quo in a sentence

I'm writing a abstract of my research project and thinking of this sentence: Investigation of job advertises and interviews with 18 employers and six employed graduates, forms the status quo of ...
0
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0answers
48 views

Proper pronunciation of the short a

When I hear the "short a" vowel pronounced it doesn't seem as fronted as it should. (I'm talking about the vowel found in words such as bad, lamp, clam, crash, usually transcribed with /æ/ in the IPA, ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

The 1st time + he went (had gone?)

I wonder why the writer didn´t use the past perfect tense in these sentences. 1) The 1st time he went (had gone?) to the ocean was when he went to the Black Sea. 2) The 1st time a German ship was ...
0
votes
0answers
189 views

What is British English for American English's “wire transfer”

This question is closely related to this one but is a little bit different. I'm in the U.S., and I'm attending a conference in Germany. The language of the conference is English. The instructions ...
0
votes
0answers
86 views

“How you can you not” vs “how can you not”

Is "How you can you not" grammatically correct? For example in the following sentence: We still aren't sure that there's any Golden hiding in her but whatever her lineage how you can you not love ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Referral Campaigns or Your Referral Schemes

I have a referral program which comprises of 50% UK users and 50% US users. Taking into account location, what would be the most appropriate title to use... Your Referral Campaigns Or Your ...
-1
votes
0answers
20 views

When writing about an Indian office (“councillor”) in an American context (“councilor”), which spelling should I prefer?

I am writing about councilors in the Municipal Corporation of Delhi. The work will be published in an undetermined American academic journal. Should I use the spelling “councillors” (Indian English) ...
-2
votes
0answers
29 views

What does “add to the store” mean?

I found it on a review about Shelley's Frankenstein. It says: the novel only adds to the store, already too great, of painful sensations.