This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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6
votes
5answers
1k views

What are the origins of gully and googly in cricket?

The OED supplies no clue to the origin of either gully or googly. It does not in fact mention etymology of the cricket sense of gully, which has led me to infer that it is from the ordinary meaning of ...
2
votes
2answers
49 views

Pronunciation of word “considered”

I have learned in school that letter 'r' is not sounded in the word 'considered', here's an example. But I have been watching the 'How I met your mother' series, and Ted have pronounced that with ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Words play - does it have a special name in English? How to do the same with 'security' word for example?

By looking at this picture: Or at the title of this album: You can see that the authors used there something which I call a word game. My question is, does doing so has an official name? How can ...
-1
votes
1answer
26 views

Determiners in English sentence vs. plurals, singulars and zero determiners. Is it ok to say?

Do I need any determiners in the sentence below in general statement? Strong winds destroy homes. Is it ok to say in English in specific situation? The strong wind destroyed the homes in North ...
-1
votes
0answers
16 views

Those who or who [on hold]

Thank you, Lord, for the teachers those who care for me. Thank you, Lord, for the teachers who care for me. Which of these two would be more correct? Thanks in advance.
-4
votes
1answer
37 views

what is the right way to greet someone while meeting first time in a day?

i just wanted to curious to know this that when ever people meet someone they used to say good morning or good evening depend upon the situation and the time . what is the right way to greet someone ...
0
votes
0answers
7 views

What should I use “can” or “could”? [migrated]

I am stucking at "can" and "could" definition in my words sentence.What should i use? [Like ebay Auction rule] 1.You are responsible to pay the charges within 7 days after won. If not,you couldn't ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

“Enjoin” vs “Adjure”

"Enjoin" means to direct someone with emphasis and authority. "Adjure" means to command in a serious manner. Are the two words used in different contexts?
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Telling the time - Minute 01 to 09

What would be the most frequent/common way of telling the time when the minute is between 01 and 09? Is there any difference between BE and AmE? 5:03 -> 1) five oh three 2) five three 3) three ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

What kind of question-tag is this: “I was in the bath, wasn't I?” Is it polite? rude?

Context: (BrE) - a friend is complaining... a- "I phoned you three times this morning but you never answered." b- "I was in the bath, wasn't I? Why the question-tag, if the listener had no idea ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Is there a complete list of every word allowed in the game 'Scrabble'? [on hold]

I am looking for a complete list of every allowed word in the English-language Scrabble game. Does anyone know of any good places to find this? Preferable as a simple '.txt' file, but any information ...
5
votes
4answers
7k views

“At the beginning of the century” or “in the beginning of the century”?

At the beginning of the century. In the beginning of the century. How to clearly distinguish when to use at, or in?
15
votes
1answer
8k views

Trapezium/trapezoid — why are the US/UK definitions swapped around?

These are the US definitions... Trapezoid — a 4-sided flat shape with straight sides that has a pair of opposite sides parallel. Trapezium — a 4-sided flat shape with straight sides and NO parallel ...
-3
votes
0answers
28 views

What is the simplest way to prepare the IELTS? [on hold]

What is the simplest way to prepare the IELTS and How I got the highest band in IELTS?
0
votes
1answer
10 views

Does Noun phrases comprise prepositions too?

Does Noun phrases comprise prepositions too? For example: -The apple in the fridge is mine. Here the noun phrase is "The apple in the fridge" or just "The apple"?
1
vote
4answers
456 views

“I usually knock off at 6”

"I usually knock off at 6", i heard an english gentleman say that. Does it sound odd only to me? In fact, what I heard was "I usually masturbate at 6" Did some research: found a book (i'm guessing ...
1
vote
2answers
38 views

Combining two sentences for title

I want to combine the following sentence: Relationship between son and mother, and relationship between daughter and mother Into one sentence for title of an article: Relationship between son, ...
-2
votes
0answers
33 views

How to find and learn English phrases [on hold]

Suggest me some ways or few book to learn advanced English phrases particularly for speaking Thank you.
11
votes
2answers
1k views

Where does the word “*ag” come from?

Once upon a time in America, particularly during the 1970s, if you asked an American whether they ‘fancied a shag’, they might well have thought of this: And therefore declined the offer for fear ...
0
votes
2answers
99 views

To gain/acquire/obtain comfort with something abstract - is this idiomatic, or at least acceptable?

I am encountering the expression "to gain comfort", "to acquire comfort", and to "obtain comfort" more and more lately. Example: "This issue was looked at in depth in 2013 and we obtained comfort at ...
-1
votes
1answer
12 views

Correct usage of message in an informal conversation [on hold]

I wrote in a sentence 'sorry to message you so early'. Is this correct usage of the word message in an informal conversation?
0
votes
4answers
88 views

What is an alternative word for 'over-lit area'?

What is an alternative word to tell about 'over lit area'? I am using it in this example: The light from my lamp has over-lit my table.
3
votes
2answers
107 views

If someone says “They insisted that he left”, is there any ambiguity in BrE or in AmE?

Do they mean something like "please go! You must leave!" or could it be "We assure you that he left"?
1
vote
1answer
50 views

How can I use the phrase, “do right by”?

1) How can I use the phrase, "do right by"? 2) And what does it mean exactly when we say that? 3) Can I say, I hope they do right by me? Or I hope he/she does right by me?
0
votes
0answers
73 views

Is it easier/faster to recognise digits or written words? [migrated]

Does anyone know of any evidence to indicate whether it is faster and/or easier for a native English speaker to recognise digits (1, 2, 3, 4) vs. full written English word equivalents (one, two, ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

Which version of English influenced the other? British / American

I remember hearing that modern American English is more similar to Old English than modern British English, due to rural British influences. Is modern American English a more accurate representation ...
11
votes
4answers
18k views

“Haven't you?” or “don't you?”

What is the right question tag (in British English) when we use the verb have? I have interviewed a few native speakers and none of them could explain why sometimes they prefer "haven't/hasn't" and ...
0
votes
0answers
4 views

what is the place of these 2 words “known” and “preserved” in the following sentence? [migrated]

what is the place of these 2 words "known" and "preserved" in the following sentence? The Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc Cave in the Ardèche department of southern France is a cave that contains the earliest ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

“is much a news in the moment”?

I'm trying to understand what is said in this video between 00:27 and 00:35... I can understand the beginning, "With religion, community relations and tolerance", but... And then? I'm listening this ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Is there any authoritative source from where we can find out if a phrase or figure of speech is American English or British English? [closed]

For example the figure of speech " One swallow doesn't make a summer" is British English. Similarly the figure of speech 'All hat and no cattle" is American English. Is there any source from where ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

“Accessory” vs “included” as adjective (BE)

I'm wondering about the use of the word accessory as an adjective. Would it be preferable in BE to say something like "This DJ controller comes with accessory headphones"? I feel that "This DJ ...
2
votes
3answers
141 views

Is “have/has got” a perfect for BrE, but not AmE?

In BrE the past participle of get is in most cases got, while in AmE it is almost always gotten. Does that imply that in the context of BrE "have/has got" is a genuine perfect construction, whereas ...
10
votes
5answers
10k views

“Stick it in the boot.” “Er, don't you mean the trunk?”

Does anyone know the etymological history or the reason behind the different names that British and American speakers use to refer to the automobile's largest storage receptacle, or more plainly, the ...
0
votes
1answer
120 views

Another way of saying “accompanied by family members”?

I'm writing a sign-up form for an event. The form has a checkbox, where people can indicate if they are bringing family members. Currently I have the field labeled: Accompanied by family members ...
10
votes
3answers
798 views

Why is the surname Gray more common than the surname Grey in the UK?

An EL&U question from 2010 asks Which is the correct spelling: "grey" or "gray"? The answers very sensibly point out the split between the UK and former British commonwealth ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Phrases used to replace“ I think” [closed]

Can anybody suggest phrases or sentences I can use instead of "I think" when it comes to giving opinions Thank you.
1
vote
3answers
2k views

“Named for” vs. “named after”

As a Brit, I'm used to the phrase named after being used to say how something got its name. For example, in Wikipedia's List of eponymous roads in London, we read that Addison Road is named after the ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

What are lexemes and morphemes? [closed]

I am preparing for my TOEFL test and want to increase my vocabulary. Can anybody please tell me what lexemes and morphemes are, and why they are important? I have Googled the terms but I need the ...
5
votes
5answers
10k views

Which is correct: “I’m done” or “I have finished”?

Which of these alternatives is grammatically correct? I’m done. or I have finished Like I’m done sounds very American, but is it grammatically correct?
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Answers for questions with “have to” and “have got to”?

Do we have to stay? a. Yes, we do. b. Yes, we have. c. Yes, we have to. Have we got to stay? a. Yes, we do. b. Yes, we have. c. Yes, we have to. I have to go home. a. Do you? b. Have you? ...
2
votes
2answers
76 views

What is the grammar of these two sentence from 'The Economist'?

To arrive at an answer, Mr Harris combs through what remains of our pre-internet lives, separating the things we will carry forward into the connected world from the worthy things we may leave ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

Interested in him learning French - with accusative 'him' [duplicate]

Good morning everyone! Is it correct to say " I' m interested in him learning French in the future"?
1
vote
4answers
629 views

Apartment building - flat building?

Does anyone in the UK say flat building? I live in the US, mind, so I have no clue. It sounds a bit funny saying that. Do they say apartment building instead, maybe? Or is there another word for a ...
5
votes
4answers
280 views

Is “crash into a bend” BrE and must there be a structure at the bend in order to use the phrase?

Includes 10 uses, showing it is far from a one-off phrase. Numbers 4 & 5 (bicycle) and 7, 8, 9, 10 ("everyday usage") are the uses I am most interested in. Question 1 If a vehicle ...
1
vote
0answers
105 views

Rhotic accent in London or in the rest of the UK?

Good evening or good afternoon for the American. I read and it is known that most British accents are non-rhotic, but I’m now in London and I have the feeling that the Rs after vowels and before a ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

What's “Blumenthal” as an adjective (UK)

I'm an American reading a series of humorous kitchen-gadget reviews in The Guardian, and the author describes a particular food dehydrator as something that "makes you feel just a little bit ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Sport” vs “Sports” Origin

I was recently reading this article on the use of "math" vs. "maths" as a collective noun (Americans use the former, Brits the latter). However, the trend seen in "math/maths" is reversed in ...
-2
votes
2answers
57 views

Someone who reads too much into things or over analyses things

Is there a single word for someone who reads too much into things? Examples from the freedictionary: This statement means exactly what it says. Don't try to read anything else into it. ...
2
votes
4answers
9k views

“Normalise” or “normalize” (British English)?

Is normalise perhaps obsolete in British English, and normalize preferred instead? I have done some Googling, it seems British English dictionaries prefer normalize, but I haven't found any ...
3
votes
3answers
102 views

What word(s) do children of English native speakers use for “kid”/“child”/etc

I'm looking for (a) word(s) that is/are perceived to be child's language by adults, not words used by adults to describe children. What would be fine though are words used by adults when they are ...