This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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1answer
25 views

Can we use apostrophe for holidays?

Can I say 13 days of March is Nowruz's holiday? Or I shouldn't use apostrophe?
0
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1answer
46 views

Do you get killed or do you be killed?

Wondering which version is correct of these two sentences: "I will go to war where I will be killed." or "I will go to war where I will get killed." I was thinking it might be an american english ...
3
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0answers
33 views

Usage of 'last June' in newspaper archive

I found a UK newspaper article from October 1918, which made reference to 'last June'. What's the likelihood of that meaning June 1917, as opposed to June 1918? I assume if it was 1917, they would ...
1
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2answers
52 views

Is “home patch” completely equivalent to “hometown”?

I heard this expression "home patch" referring to "hometown" from a recent BBC Documentary. Since I am not a native English speaker, I am wondering about whether it is completely equivalent to "...
25
votes
8answers
5k views

What's the English equivalent for the Italian slang expression “magna magna”

"Magna magna" is a typical Italian slang expression used by common people to give vent to their frustrations and disappointment with politicians when cases of corruption and personal interest in ...
4
votes
4answers
5k views

Anyone for pudding?

I saw a reference to blancmange in an answer to another question and it got me thinking about pudding. It is very common in British English for the word pudding to be used as the general term for ...
7
votes
5answers
898 views

How toffee-nosed is “toffee-nosed”?

Not being a speaker of British English, I was much amused on discovering the new adjective toffee-nosed. The American Heritage dictionary doesn't list it at all, but I found a definition in Collins: ...
7
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9answers
381 views

BrEng expressions to describe a man who is becoming stupid

I'm searching for British English expressions describing a person who starts to be stupid, crazy or foolish. I mean something like the idiom to lose one's head and epithets like: You fool! Are there ...
0
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1answer
7 views

Does “key challenge” mean the primary source that causes the challenge?

I am confused which one is the key challenge? a growing demand for skilled accounting professionals that leads to a talent crunch or a talent crunch that leads to a growing demand for skilled ...
4
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1answer
86 views

In which regional dialects is “I'm sat” common?

I had always associated the construct I'm sat here (as opposed to I'm sitting here) with the north of England. I know I've heard it from people with Yorkshire or Manchester accents, for example. Yet, ...
4
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3answers
72 views

What would be the proper usage of “Qua” in a sentence?

I'm a native English speaker, but I'm trying to expand my vocabulary slightly. I looked this up online, and the definition for it baffled me. How exactly would I go about using this particular word?
3
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5answers
2k views

Convolve vs. convolute

I understand that for common usage these words have distinct meanings. However in mathematics there is a process called convolution, and sometimes you hear "you need to convolve X" and sometimes "you ...
-2
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0answers
33 views

“If you please” and informal talk

can you suggest me a informal way to say " We can meet on next weekend,if you please" Is this grammatically correct? and could you suggest me more way to say this in informal talk Thanks in advance!!...
0
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0answers
36 views

Use of 'floor' instead of 'ground' when referring to exterior surfaces

I've noticed more and more lately in UK English that people say, for example: He fell to the floor. when they're describing an exterior situation. I would always have said He fell to the ...
8
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2answers
12k views

Why isn't “citizen” spelled as “citisen” in British English?

In British English vocabulary, most words with "z" are spelled with "s". For example, "capitalization" is "capitalisation", "industrialization" is "industrialisation". But for some words, like "...
1
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2answers
1k views

Is written “Canadian English” closer to “American English” or “British English”?

I'm having some writing done for a website aimed at a Canadian audience. In order to leverage our resources more, I'd like to focus on "American English" or "British English". So, is written "...
4
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4answers
13k views

How do they express the time, in American and British English?

I don't know if this is a good question. But as far as I know, and as I do it, American English also say "after" other than "past" in expressing times. For example, a quarter after six instead of, a ...
0
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1answer
47 views

Take your hands out “of / from” your pockets

Which is proper: Take your hands out of your pockets. Take your hands out from your pockets. Is there any difference in American English and British English? P.S. Also reading the ...
2
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1answer
27 views

In British English is it acceptable to say “securitization”?

In general I find the financial term "securitization" written with "z", but in some Basel Committee documents I've found "securitisation" with "s". I think it is more common the term with "z", may I ...
0
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1answer
55 views

Different-colored or different colored? UK vs US English

Can I write "differently colored" instead? What expression most British or Americans would rather use? "socks, different in color" "socks of different colors" "a different color of each sock"
22
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1answer
571 views

British Mass Nouns versus American Count Nouns

British English often employs mass nouns where American English would only employ count nouns. Count nouns are nouns which take pluralization and numerical quantifiers like 'many'. Mass nouns can't be ...
-4
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0answers
45 views

I can understand English, but I can't speak! [migrated]

This is my problem: If an English man is speaking, I can understand him well.. I've read too many English novels and story,, I can understand an English movie without any subtitle.. and when I ...
4
votes
1answer
116 views

Is “a few street away” a grammatically acceptable idiomatic expression in some dialect of UK English?

I am an American and I am reading a book titled Bloodmage by a British author named Stephen Aryan. He uses expressions I was previously unfamiliar with, such as "sat" instead of "sitting" (i.e., "sat ...
-7
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0answers
36 views

use of has have,have have,has has,have had,had had [closed]

Please let me know the uses of the above verbs as soon as possible as my examinations are knocking at the door.
3
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1answer
109 views

What do you call 'underground floors' in AmE and BrE?

I understand that the word basement means: the part of a building that is wholly or partly below ground level [Merriam-Webster] But I wonder what American English and British English call 'the ...
5
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2answers
314 views

What is the entomology of “ligger”?

This answer on a prior question points out that ligger is defined by UrbanDictionary as: Ligger An individual who attends parties, openings, social gatherings and events with the sole ...
2
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1answer
54 views

How is a misuse of punctuation spacing perceived by native British and American people?

I am a Frenchie and an English enthusiast. In my language, we use spaces before quotation marks, exclamation marks, and colons. While I'm aware that this is not the case in English, there are times ...
3
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1answer
56 views

Are these mispronunciations by my British English text-to-speech engine a reflection of an actual British English usage?

A little context: I'm a native speaker of American English. I use Google's text-to-speech engine with the British voice, as I find the roboticness (roboticity?) of delivery to be less distracting in a ...
2
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1answer
56 views

'There is no such a thing as a free lunch' in academic writing [closed]

In the context of an academic publication in British English, I'm tempted to paraphrase the expression "There is no such a thing as a free lunch". Does it sound too informal and, if so, are there ...
3
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2answers
89 views

Does “shore” require the “r” sound in the pronunciation (UK pronunciation)?

In the Cambridge Dictionary I see the pronunciation of the word shore is represented by /ʃɔːr/. In the WordReference dictionary it is instead pronounced as /ʃɔː/. The "r" sound is silent in the last ...
10
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1answer
309 views

Origin of the slang AmE and BrE usage of “beef”

Beef began its life as an intransitive verb in 1888 and soon took on the noun meaning in 1899 appearing in such expressions as "What's your beef? and "I had a beef with him" (not a steak). Beef ...
3
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1answer
32 views

Rule for if a verb can take -ing (simple present vs present cont.)? eg. I love vs I am loving

As a BrE. speaker, there are come constructions using verbs in their present continuous form which just sound wrong. The best example being, "I am loving Stack Exchange." After reading around the ...
0
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1answer
39 views

What does “the Park” mean in spy novels? [closed]

What does"the Park" mean in spy novels? I can read it as "head quarter", but not sure. And in that case, how does that word come from?
12
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1answer
385 views

How does the pronunciation of 'the' vary in British English?

In the months leading up to the UK Referendum, I've heard the phrase "the E.U." thousands of times, and I've noticed that nearly all media-speakers pronounce it as /ðəʔiːjuː/. My memory, and my old ...
2
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9answers
6k views

How do American English and British English use the definite article differently?

I decided to make sure that I know this important difference between American and British English, so I wrote what I have found out so far and I would be grateful to anyone who reads this and tells me ...
24
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3answers
2k views

Why are “slip roads” called that way?

Slip roads are used to allow vehicles to merge in a road whose speed is higher or, conversely, let them leave it safely. This term appears to be British English usage. Here is an example of usage: ...
3
votes
3answers
292 views

In which countries would “tags” be understood to mean “License plates and stickers that show the registration is currently valid”?

On our sister site a user recently used the term "tags" in relation to taxis in China. I thought it might man some kind of official authorization to operate a taxi. But upon clarification I was told ...
-3
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1answer
46 views

Do vs Dost, the difference [closed]

"Thou coward knight, why wilt thou not do battle with me?" -The Age of Chivalry, Chapter 16 In this sentence, why is do not dost? Very commonly do I see the word dost be used in older text in place ...
3
votes
1answer
35 views

What is an 'end-of-the-pier entertainment'?

Reading "Nothing To Be Frightened Of" by Julian Barnes I found this phrase. This is the full paragraph. If there were a games-playing God, He would surely get especial ludic pleasure from ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

what is the meaning of “strange pub”?

"You cannot order it in a strange pub..." I found this when I was solving a crossword.. I'm wondering what dose the "strange pub" mean? According to the dictionary.com the "pub" is a British slang ...
5
votes
3answers
86 views

Is there any difference between “I'm sat” and “I'm sitting”?

In BrE, one can apparently use I'm sat here to mean I'm sitting here. This seems to be a relatively modern usage: I had originally thought that this was a regional or dialectical variant and had ...
1
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1answer
83 views

A word to describe taking pleasure in the way a word sounds

What is a word that describes one's satisfaction in the phonetics of a word? Like visual appeal of a pictures, but the audible appeal of a word.
3
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2answers
78 views

Deletion of /h/

I was once told by my BrE teacher that when we have a word ending with a consonant followed by another word starting with h, the h is deleted, meaning that the pronunciation is different. For ...
0
votes
3answers
5k views

What's an appropriate response to a British person asking “You alright?”

I've heard this phrase from various British people: "You alright" (comes out as a slurred "y'rite") and I'm always a bit confused on how to respond. From context, it seems to have two meanings (...
4
votes
1answer
9k views

How to write out numbers in compliance with British usage?

This question regards the numbers from 1 to 999. We can ignore commas, hyphens, and spaces. What I'm interested in is when and where to use the word "and". There are a few interesting cases: 1) 20 &...
45
votes
16answers
7k views

Is “act like a mensch” too localized for ELU readers (U.S. and/or British English)?

This question was motivated by an interesting comment that was made at http://academia.stackexchange.com/posts/comments/123681?noredirect=1 Part of Answer: I don't think that particular research ...
2
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3answers
259 views

Is “have/has got” a perfect for BrE, but not AmE?

In BrE the past participle of get is in most cases got, while in AmE it is almost always gotten. Does that imply that in the context of BrE "have/has got" is a genuine perfect construction, whereas ...
2
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3answers
3k views

Meaning of “at least Dick Turpin wore a mask”

I tried to sell my stuff and one of the guys asked me if I could bargain on the item and I said no. He replied with the message, At least Dick Turpin wore a mask. What does that mean?
7
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3answers
15k views

Is “targetted” a standard British English spelling?

Wiktionary says that the difference between "targetting" and "targeting" is that the first one is a British spelling and the second one is American. Meanwhile, Oxford Dictionaries says that "...
0
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0answers
23 views

Can the word USUAL become an adverb?

Looking at this sentence - 'The children seem their usual amount of tired.' I'm trying to figure out whether the word USUAL is an adverb in this sentence or not? To me it gives further information ...