This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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-1
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0answers
18 views

grammatical name and grammatical function [on hold]

the genes of many of those infective agents.what is the grammatical name and grammatical function of the expression?my own answer:noun clause and function adjective noun infective agents.
1
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2answers
173 views

Centre of competence

I have seen this expression several times (Google search gives 67M answers), but it seems mostly used by French or Swiss institutions, while Wikipedia mentions centre of excellence or competency ...
1
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1answer
34 views

“Wherever or Whenever”

Apologies for the title which sounds like the Shakira classic, but would you say "Thank you for providing help whenever possible" or "wherever possible"
2
votes
3answers
122 views

Femicide vs feminicide

While using the term femicide I realised that the is another term, probably a synonym, feminicide. From the following Wikipedia extract, the two terms appear to be synonyms: Femicide or ...
-2
votes
0answers
29 views

What does “add to the store” mean? [on hold]

I found it on a review about Shelley's Frankenstein. It says: the novel only adds to the store, already too great, of painful sensations.
12
votes
4answers
361 views

Usage of “hysterical” meaning “very funny.”

One meaning (I am personally not very familiar with) of the adjective hysterical is: causing unrestrained laughter; very funny: Oh, that joke is hysterical! (Dictionary.com) No other ...
0
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0answers
24 views

The United States. Possesive is its or their?

The United States made no secret of its/their hope to absorb the provinces... http://grammarist.com/usage/united-states/ "Although United States is usually treated as a singular noun, it’s treated ...
10
votes
5answers
3k views

When someone praises me awkwardly too much, how to reply? [on hold]

When someone praises me awkwardly, as in too much, to make me happy or to get some help or something else from me, how to say "don't do that". Like, "I'll do that for you, you don't need to --- me." ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

The use of “proceed” on the web

Recently I have been puzzled why the word proceed is found on most websites when the user is going to checkout, cart or shopping cart. Is there a reason for this in the english language that warrants ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

To encounter someone/something or to encounter with someone/something?

I have seen both forms and I don't know which one is the more appropriate (if there is a difference). The actual sentence in which I want to use it is "particles can encounter (with) the atoms of the ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

What's a “summer-funeral hit”?

In a YouTube comment commenting on Jamala's song 1944, someone says You guys enjoy your summer-funeral hit! I have nothing else to add. after saying Ukraine should't have won! What a ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

'café' pronunciation

I've found recently a second variant of pronunciation of 'cafe' word: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/cafe. The usual one is /ˈkafeɪ/ ˈkæ-'fay But the OD link gives this too: ...
3
votes
4answers
70 views

Word that describes many common household purchases

I m writing a research paper about the over consumption. I am struggling to find a word or words that describes the things we normally use in our daily lives like toothbrush, dish washer liquid, ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Different-colored or different colored? UK vs US English

Can I write "differently colored" instead? What expression most British or Americans would rather use? "socks, different in color" "socks of different colors" "a different color of each sock"
4
votes
1answer
197 views

Adele's pronunciation - Can't recognise some sounds in 'Rolling in the Deep'

I've listened to Rolling in the deep many times. But I still can't hear the words being pronounced, even when I know what they are. Think of me in the depths of your despair . In "in the depths ...
5
votes
1answer
115 views

Which words or grammar forms are likely to cause a collision between American and British English?

For all the Mickey-taking on both sides of the water I suppose British and American speakers understand one another 99% of the time. Can anyone think of any areas of vocabulary or grammar where ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

What grammar to use for a foreign Engineering student, both in Academia and Professionally? [on hold]

As a European foreign speaker, speaking and writing English both as a student and in my profession; I would like to be more consistent in my grammar and would like to know what is more used in an ...
5
votes
0answers
126 views

Crepi il lupo in English? [closed]

What is the English version of the Italian: "In bocca al lupo / Crepi"Crepi il lupo"? Is this correct?: "Good luck! / Cracks the wolf"
5
votes
7answers
6k views

What connotation exactly does the word “noddy” have in British English?

I watched a BBC adaptation of Charles Dickens' The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby the other day, and came across a bit of dialogue I couldn't quite decipher: A character named Squeers: ...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

“Five things to do for free” vs “Five free things to do” vs “Free five things to do” [closed]

I'm having a dilemma writing a slogan for my website. Website features articles of 5 free items to in specific locations. Which of the following taglines sounds most professional and British ...
-1
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0answers
20 views

When writing about an Indian office (“councillor”) in an American context (“councilor”), which spelling should I prefer?

I am writing about councilors in the Municipal Corporation of Delhi. The work will be published in an undetermined American academic journal. Should I use the spelling “councillors” (Indian English) ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

What does “in the corner, undone” mean?

(I'm guessing this is some British slang for being in jail or dead?) From the lyrics of Mika's "Dr. John": I look for joy in a strange place From the back of the bar From afar I see ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

Is “a few street away” a grammatically acceptable idiomatic expression in some dialect of UK English?

I am an American and I am reading a book titled Bloodmage by a British author named Stephen Aryan. He uses expressions I was previously unfamiliar with, such as "sat" instead of "sitting" (i.e., "sat ...
3
votes
1answer
102 views

What's the difference between “slap-up meal” and “gourmet meal”?

The following quote comes from a collocation book for ESL purposes. I can see it's trying to teach us about the usage of different expressions to describe different kinds of meals. "Whether you want ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

“Seductive” as an adjective for describing snake

I would really appreciate if some native English speaker help me in clearing my doubt. Recently, in one of Indian English newspaper the column writer wrote the following: "A scary sci-fi scenario. ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Sentence Transformation- Doubt. For experts in Grammar! English Language

I have a doubt that is the following one: I have two alternative sentence transformations of this sentence below and, I wonder if it is possible to write the adverb "sometimes" before the subject ...
24
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9answers
3k views

Does anyone use both “whinge” and “whine?”

The words "whinge" and "whine" have separate (albeit very similar) definitions in the OED, and they have distinct pronunciations. "Whinge" seems completely restricted to BritE; I have never heard it ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

A word to describe taking pleasure in the way a word sounds

What is a word that describes one's satisfaction in the phonetics of a word? Like visual appeal of a pictures, but the audible appeal of a word.
1
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1answer
96 views

Is “maiden speech” regarded as politically incorrect?

Some people use "inaugural speech" instead of maiden speech. For example, from the Twitter account of the Australian Sex Party: From one year ago, the Inaugural Speech of @FionaPattenMLC ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

How accepted is ‘f***ing’ in informal conversation?

For the past twenty years I've heard people use the adjective fucking more often than ever before in the US: in real life, in movies and on TV. Sentences like "You fucking idiot." I've also heard ...
2
votes
2answers
8k views

Is “despatch” the British spelling for “dispatch” or is it an archaic spelling (or both)?

In John Ormsby's 1885 translation of Don Quixote, the word "despatch" is used. Is that the corresponding British spelling for "dispatch" or is it simply an archaic spelling (in both the American and ...
13
votes
3answers
5k views

Why is “a couple of <things>” often shortened to “a couple <things>”?

I would write a couple of . I often read/hear a couple . I assumed this was an American English thing (I'm British), and just a convenient shortening of the phrase for speaking. It's easier to say a ...
3
votes
9answers
5k views

How does “spanner” come to mean “a wrench”?

"Wrenching" refers to an injury in which some muscle is forcibly twisted. A wrench is a tool that applies a twisting force to something, so that seems consistent. "To span" means to bridge a gap. ...
5
votes
2answers
113 views

Is the term “Christian name” in decline in British English?

I learned most of my British English as a lad of thirteen in 1968–69 and one of twenty in 1975–76, during which (academic) years I lived in Sussex. As a Yank (I think that at least is ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

What else can you learn other than phrasal verb and idioms to sound like a native english speaker? [closed]

I have learnt a few phrasal verbs and idioms through a site that i found very helpful. I was wondering if there's anything else like this to learn to improve my English (I don't know what PV and ...
6
votes
1answer
52 views

Pronouncing the definite article

The definite article is mostly pronounced 'thuh' before a noun beginning with a consonant (thuh chair), and 'thee' in front of a noun beginning with a vowel (thee apple). Question 1: what is the name ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Does the English language have an official Academy? [duplicate]

For some languages, there are academies that decide topics such as grammar and spelling of things, for example, for the Spanish language, there are 22 academies in 22 different countries, all making ...
3
votes
3answers
231 views

Is “have/has got” a perfect for BrE, but not AmE?

In BrE the past participle of get is in most cases got, while in AmE it is almost always gotten. Does that imply that in the context of BrE "have/has got" is a genuine perfect construction, whereas ...
23
votes
7answers
1k views

Eww! Has it crossed the pond yet?

I hear eww (sometimes spelt as ew) fairly regularly on American sitcoms, usually uttered by a scatterbrained beautiful blonde girl when she sees or hears something disgusting. I don't recall it ever ...
45
votes
3answers
3k views

What does “trodie” mean?

In "The Star Fraction" by Ken MacLeod, a Scottish science fiction author, a couple walks through a street and past a "trodie". The novel is set in Britain, so it may be a British expression. The ...
4
votes
2answers
14k views

Should you always start a new paragraph when starting a new speaker even if the sentence directly before that is directly related?

When a new speaker starts a new line of dialogue you start a new paragraph at the same time. Does this rule still hold true if the sentence before the dialogue starts relates directly to the dialogue? ...
11
votes
3answers
64k views

How do I use “as of now” correctly?

Just to clarify, I am not a native English speaker. I occasionally hear from other non-native English speakers the use of the phrase: "As of now" with the meaning of Currently. Initially I did not ...
20
votes
8answers
26k views

Is it proper to omit periods after honorifics (Mr, Mrs, Dr)?

I've been reading the Economist lately and they apparently don't punctuate honorifics like "Mr.", "Mrs.", e.g. The popular rejection of Mr Mubarak offers the Middle East’s best chance for reform ...
5
votes
2answers
8k views

A British pronunciation issue

Most dictionaries list the pronunciation of issue as /ˈɪʃuː/ (ĭsho͞o) in American English and /ˈɪs.juː/ (ĭsyo͞o) possibly alongside /ˈɪʃjuː/ (ĭshyo͞o) and /ˈɪʃuː/ in British English. One informal ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Is “mail” still used for “international correspondence” in British English?

While pondering this question asked earlier today, I started to wonder why post (in the sense of correspondence) is used in British English but not American English. So I looked up the etymology of ...
0
votes
3answers
101 views

'Go to sleep' vs 'Go and sleep'?

I just had a linguistics test (it's called UKLO) that measures you're ability to problem solve and translate languages you know nothing about. For one of my translation answers I wrote 'Don't go and ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Word that Resembles The Dutch Word Kudde

Kudde, Couth, is there an english farmers word that resembles Kudde. Kudde means herd, flock, fold, drove, livestock, and bevy. So I'm looking for a word that means something along the lines of ...
0
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1answer
45 views

The usage of “Per se”

Is the usage of the phrase "Per se" correct in this sentence? Sometimes, religion, though not be enaugh per se, may lead to violence.
5
votes
3answers
302 views

Dinner at mine or yours?

I have noticed in British TV shows the common usage of 'mine' or 'yours' being used to mean 'my place' and 'your place' respectively. I spent a year in Britain in the early 1980s and I don't recall ...
1
vote
1answer
442 views

Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?