This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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2
votes
1answer
7 views

What word(s) do children of English native speakers use for “kid”/“child”/etc

I'm looking for (a) word(s) that is/are perceived to be child's language by adults, not words used by adults to describe children. What would be fine though are words used by adults when they are ...
-2
votes
1answer
24 views

We like a name but dont know how to spell it?

We like the sound of Mill-eat-a but dont know how to spell it so that shortens to Millie and not milie as in cyrus
4
votes
2answers
273 views

Did the modern British accent originate from a speech impediment?

I have heard a theory that the modern British pronunciation (as compared, for example, to American pronunciation) started when somebody in the monarchy had a speech impediment (perhaps rhotacism) and, ...
3
votes
4answers
8k views

Which is correct: 'Drafty' or 'draughty'?

I have been changing 'drafty' for 'draughty', or because of my confusion, removing the word altogether while subbing online articles. I'd appreciate guidance on which term is correct for UK English. ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Is it acceptable to make a question by adding “or” at the end?

Example: "It is unacceptable for young ladies to put up their bare feet in public railway carriages, or?" I only ask because the germans do it all the time as in: "Ich habe dir schon einmal darum ...
3
votes
3answers
92 views

Can there be a difference between learned and learnt?

To the best of my knowledge, there is no difference in meaning between learnt and the single-syllable form of learned. This is supported by the answers to When do you use "learnt" and when "learned"? ...
9
votes
4answers
2k views

50s synonym for “snogging”

What would the British term in 1954 have been for "snogging"? "Making out" is American. "All over each other" doesn't seem quite specific enough.
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Are there linguistic markers that indicate to subordinates a desire to be addressed less formally

It's a bit of a shame that Is "pal" too informal when the other person is much older than me? was closed, as it dabbles in a difficult topic for all non-native speakers of English. Although ...
8
votes
5answers
1k views

What is the name of the phoneme produced in an upper-class Briton's pronunciation of the word “Duke”? What's different in the articulation?

When someone with a Received Pronunciation accent pronounces the word duke, as in The Duke of York, he doesn't pronounce it with a "hard" 'd', as one might pronounce the word duh, but a softer type ...
0
votes
7answers
89 views

Looking for a word like “eulogy”, but for a person that has not died?

I was thinking of words like the "background" of a person? Their overall qualities summarised into a short form. Eulogy might be a bad example, as it implies praise. A word meaning "a summary of ...
-2
votes
1answer
110 views

Is there different word corresponding to “teatime” in American English?

There is a British English term "teatime" or "afternoon tea". I'm wondering how people refer to it in American English.
28
votes
4answers
6k views

How and when did American spelling supersede British spelling in the US?

Considering that Webster published his first dictionary in 1806, is there a recognised tipping point (year, decade, etc.) that marked the move from traditional British spelling to Webster's American? ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

what does “casting a long silver of gold” mean?

so, today I was reading this book and I came across this sentence: "At the very end of the passage, a door stood ajar, and a flickering light shone through the gap, casting a long silver of gold ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

IELTS Exam Online course [closed]

Could you please suggest me that good IELTS online course site or practice test site?
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Is written “Canadian English” closer to “American English” or “British English”?

I'm having some writing done for a website aimed at a Canadian audience. In order to leverage our resources more, I'd like to focus on "American English" or "British English". So, is written ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

To gain/acquire/obtain comfort with something abstract - is this idiomatic, or at least acceptable?

I am encountering the expression "to gain comfort", "to acquire comfort", and to "obtain comfort" more and more lately. Example: "This issue was looked at in depth in 2013 and we obtained comfort at ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

What is British English for American English's “wire transfer”

This question is closely related to this one but is a little bit different. I'm in the U.S., and I'm attending a conference in Germany. The language of the conference is English. The instructions ...
2
votes
3answers
235 views

What is the meaning of “cop” in: “if London cops it, he'll cop it”?

What is the meaning of the text in bold: He says if London cops it, he'll cop it. And not to worry, Dad. I have found these meanings for cop in The Free Dictionary, but none of them seem ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

What's “Blumenthal” as an adjective (UK)

I'm an American reading a series of humorous kitchen-gadget reviews in The Guardian, and the author describes a particular food dehydrator as something that "makes you feel just a little bit ...
0
votes
3answers
104 views

(go) off the boil

"(go)off the boil" seems to mean "past the crisis" in British English. What is the origin/etymology of this expression? Is it used nowadays?
0
votes
6answers
403 views

Word for person who was ignored by everyone while alive, but whose importance was realized after he died

Is there a single word for a person who was ignored by everyone when he was alive, but later people realized his importance after he died? It can also be related to his work, teaching or something ...
-5
votes
1answer
59 views

Find the grammatical error in sentence [closed]

Q1 it is time we should have done something useful. can any body explain that error ?
19
votes
9answers
2k views

A modern equivalent for “at the coalface”

I let you believe that I am one of the nation's top geneticists, when actually I am a moderately successful scientist who is now coasting on past research, doing the odd bit of examining or ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Archaic English new words: from a Nigerian [closed]

A Nigerian Governor was being interviewed by a local Television station. He was speaking of the political situation of Rivers state in Nigeria. Nigeria is an English speaking country because it was a ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Which English to use in Portugal: British or American? [closed]

I'm not sure this is the right place to ask this, but any help is appreciated. I'm Portuguese, but I also use English for my work. For that, I use dictionaries in my computer. My question is: which ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

Is the word,“Whilst”, not used in US English?

In my spare time i sometimes help out a good friend of mine. He is a professional translator, self-employed so he can pretty much pick his own assignments, which is a good position to be in, but i ...
2
votes
3answers
104 views

Swear words in common usage by educated people in 1916

What swear words might have been commonly used in conversation (and, in particular, oral argument) in and around 1916, by literate men? As sources from the time are largely written, it is difficult to ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

How do I say “my car is broken” idiomatically? [closed]

Hmm: the version I give has never sounded quite right to me, but as a non-native English speaker, I don't know how native American or English people say this. So I'd be really glad if you could ...
0
votes
2answers
55 views

How, as a parent, do I address a teacher (in the UK)?

In semi/non-official correspondence, how a parent should address a teacher of their children? Dear Miss Lastname, Dear Ms Lastname, Dear Firstname or something else? I know it's more about ...
2
votes
1answer
272 views

How is the spelling of a hyphenated word read?

How is the spelling of a hyphenated word usually read out loud? For example, with "Anglo-Saxon", do we say: "It is spelt as ...
3
votes
5answers
939 views

Why do the British refer to things as 'posh'

Why do the British refer to something very smart, or people who are very well-off as being 'posh'?
0
votes
1answer
244 views

Simple past or present perfect when describing a series of recent actions

I, as an American, would opt for the simple past rather than the present perfect in the following sentence: Today she has gone to a class, and after that she has been shopping. Is this sentence ...
12
votes
5answers
509 views

Was the BrEng term “coloured” derogatory in the 1970s?

SAM Look... I owe it to myself to say this to you, okay? Leave Tony Crane. Just go far away from him. He's gonna ask you to marry him and he's gonna make you a business partner. EVE Is ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

“Accessory” vs “included” as adjective (BE)

I'm wondering about the use of the word accessory as an adjective. Would it be preferable in BE to say something like "This DJ controller comes with accessory headphones"? I feel that "This DJ ...
14
votes
2answers
3k views

Preventative vs. preventive

In this answer about the non-word disabilitated, the word preventative is compared (unfavourably, if my reading of the implication is correct) to preventive. However, I have always used preventative, ...
2
votes
3answers
129 views

Is “have/has got” a perfect for BrE, but not AmE?

In BrE the past participle of get is in most cases got, while in AmE it is almost always gotten. Does that imply that in the context of BrE "have/has got" is a genuine perfect construction, whereas ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Rhotic accent in London or in the rest of the UK?

Good evening or good afternoon for the American. I read and it is known that most British accents are non-rhotic, but I’m now in London and I have the feeling that the Rs after vowels and before a ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Right phrase to request for introduction [closed]

I have been hearing some podcasts, in every podcast I hear, the anchor asks the guests Why don't you introduce yourself? And, in some other I heard this phrase Can you kindly introduce about ...
0
votes
3answers
69 views

What is an alternative word for 'over-lit area'?

What is an alternative word to tell about 'over lit area'? I am using it in this example: The light from my lamp has over-lit my table.
2
votes
3answers
226 views

“Can I help you, love?” Love as a form of address: is it used regionally to talk to strangers?

I've been reading a chapter about the vocabulary of the Yorkshire dialect in the UK. Among other interesting curiosities ("child" plural "childer", "lad and lass" for "son an daughter") I've come ...
3
votes
3answers
90 views

Lessing's Quote and its meaning

I am reading Viktor Frankl's "Man's Search for Meaning". On Page 32 the author attributes a quote to Lessing which goes as follows: There are things which must cause you to lose your reason or you ...
3
votes
3answers
128 views

Is it arrogant to speak with a British accent among people with an American accent if english is my second language? [closed]

My mother tongue is spanish and during the university almost all my english professors were from England, after several years studying English as a Second Language (ESL) I ended up with a strange (and ...
2
votes
2answers
81 views

Function of participle [closed]

I know that the participle can be part of a verb to express continuous tense, perfect tense, passive voice. And it also can has a separate line as an adjective. The participle adjective have either ...
10
votes
4answers
10k views

“Stick it in the boot.” “Er, don't you mean the trunk?”

Does anyone know the etymological history or the reason behind the different names that British and American speakers use to refer to the automobile's largest storage receptacle, or more plainly, the ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

Use “underway” or “under way” as an adverb?

Is it proper to use underway as an adverb? Or should under way be used? Merriam-Webster defines underway as an adjective and under way as an adverb. The Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & ...
1
vote
0answers
78 views

how to respond when our boss says i am sorry for not replying to your mail in uk english? [closed]

I had sent a mail for leave application to my boss, but she was not around to reply, she replied me saying sorry the next day, so how should i respond?
33
votes
14answers
13k views

Friendly way of saying “I love you”

In Spanish, Te amo (I love you) has more romantic feeling than saying Te quiero. The last one is used as a friendly way of saying I love you, but without romantic purposes. However, if translated to ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

What is it called when some pronounces their “s” sounds sharply

I've long noticed that when it comes to pronouncing words containing an "s" sound, their are those that pronounce it softly and those that pronounce it sharply. I have always wanted to put a name to ...
6
votes
4answers
503 views

Using archaic (obsolete) words for decimal penny

So, is it possible to use words such as the "threepence", "elevenpence" etc. for sums in new pence (introduced after 1971)? For example, to read the value of £6.03 as "six pounds and threepence" ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“Sport” vs “Sports” Origin

I was recently reading this article on the use of "math" vs. "maths" as a collective noun (Americans use the former, Brits the latter). However, the trend seen in "math/maths" is reversed in ...