This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

3
votes
3answers
131 views

What are some synonyms for uncriticisable? [closed]

I honestly can't think of a word for this. The Cambridge British English dictionary doesn't have it listed as a word, other dictionaries online sometimes have it but don't list synonyms for it. I've ...
3
votes
3answers
309 views

Title of a widow?

I have to book a flight for my grandma who was married and became a widow. She still has to get a new ID but I want to book the flight asap. How do I write her title? Miss, misses, or?
0
votes
2answers
133 views

How may I write good English? [closed]

I am a senior professional from India. I studied most of my educational career in English medium. For professional reasons and personal fervor I want to write good English. I am looking for expert ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Is this a correct English or not? [closed]

This is a word that I want to say to my Hostel's room mate for maintaining a routine "Don't be disturbed each other with/without our friends"
2
votes
2answers
136 views

“Took off” or “taken off”? [closed]

My boss was talking to me. How could I have just taken off? My boss was talking to me. How could I have just took off?" Which one is correct. (or are they both wrong?)
3
votes
0answers
76 views

English and Double Abbreviation Possibilities [duplicate]

I've always wondered (and as a child caused quite a few frowns from my English teachers) working this out.. If we can abbreviate words like: Would and Not to Wouldn't Could and Have to Could've ...
0
votes
0answers
69 views

Unnamed vs Nameless

I've scouted around and found that: Unnamed defined is "not having being given a name" Nameless defined is "not having a name / unknown as to what the name is My main question is what is the term ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

Definition of “Veteran” as applied to Motor Vehicles

In a documentary video about Lord Montague and the Montague Motor Museum, the following narration was used: And on this fine April day in 1959, hosts of strange vehicles are converging upon the ...
1
vote
2answers
38 views

Why are both blazing or blazingly appropriate?

This SE QA explains that both blazing and blazingly are valid English words (despite what my spell-checker claims). Can anyone explain why they are both valid, and the difference between the words. ...
1
vote
1answer
94 views

Is there a British slang word for “company man”?

I remember coming across a word that was British, and seemed to be a more specific reference to what we call a "company man" in the US. But this was a while ago and I forget it.
8
votes
2answers
258 views

Why “paediatrics” but “pedagogue” in British English?

There's an account of the British ae/oe and American "e" spellings (as in diarrh(o)ea, f(a)eces, and other fun words) on wikipedia. What I'm wondering is why, even in British English, pedagogue/...
3
votes
3answers
97 views

How did the term “bolshie” come to be applied to birds?

This question is prompted by a term in http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/73108561/Council-warning-threatened-falcon-species-launch-fists-of-fury-against-walkers Falcons were bolshie birds, ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

Subject verb agreement in Number? [closed]

In the sentence " The Hospitality of the Villagers is to be learnt by all" Why "is" used as verb. why not "are" ? is subject used in this sentence is plural or singular?
24
votes
9answers
3k views

Does anyone use both “whinge” and “whine?”

The words "whinge" and "whine" have separate (albeit very similar) definitions in the OED, and they have distinct pronunciations. "Whinge" seems completely restricted to BritE; I have never heard it ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

Using status quo in a sentence

I'm writing a abstract of my research project and thinking of this sentence: Investigation of job advertises and interviews with 18 employers and six employed graduates, forms the status quo of ...
1
vote
1answer
421 views

Can you say “much more people?” [duplicate]

Note this question is not a duplicate of this question because that question does not address the use of "far more". It sounds strange to me but it's probably perfectly fine. "Many more" or "far ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Is “ice-jam” used in British English?

Would it be correct to use the term ice-jam, meaning ice formations in the water, in British English?
0
votes
1answer
715 views

Is the idiom “as neat as a pin” an American phrase?

I'm editing a novel set in 1930s England, written by an American author, and have been editing out any Americanisms I come across. I just read a line of dialogue containing the idiom "as neat as a pin"...
1
vote
1answer
179 views

Screaming for the beagle

In the 1951 film "Scrooge" with Alastair Sim, Mrs. Dilber runs down the stairs screaming and says "You'll force me to scream for the beagle!" What does she mean by that?
5
votes
1answer
427 views

Origin of fag (meaning a cigarette in British English)

Aside from the offensive meaning, colloquial British English uses the term fag to indicate a cigarette. James has gone outside for a fag In my googling, I thought perhaps this originates from ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

What is the meaning of ground truth?

I am reading the paper : http://mi-lab.org/files/2014/10/FlexSense_web.pdf . I have problems understanding use of ground truth the following : Main Pipeline Reconstructing the full 3D surface ...
0
votes
1answer
539 views

Earlier in the day meaning? [closed]

Today ,while reading news paper I came across the sentence "she had gone shopping earlier in the day " ....what does it mean ......? My conjecture "yesterday ?
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Out or out of which is it? [duplicate]

Which is correct 1 Get out the house. Or 2 Get out of the house? I've heard that the American English standard is the first one and the British English standard is the second one. Is that true? The ...
1
vote
3answers
63 views

don't have VS haven't

I don't have a west country accent. I haven't a west country accent. So, Which one is correct and why?
5
votes
2answers
227 views

Can you hear the difference between 'Writer' and 'Rider'? Why?

Apologies in advance for the slightly blog-like nature of this question. The Background Some of the comments in relation to this question here: Unvoiced /dʒ/ and /ʒ/ in word final position ... ...
3
votes
1answer
103 views

BrE: pronunciation of “to”

My wife is Guyanese and she tells me that in Guyana they are taught to pronounce "to" as an American would pronounce "toe." Guyana was a British colony (the most recent invaders) and their educational ...
2
votes
0answers
36 views

Meaningless “Do” And the supposed relationship between English and the Celtic languages [duplicate]

The verb "do" often serves a meaningless purpose in questions. John McWhorter argues in his book "Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue" that this is a direct influence of the Celtic languages. In all of my ...
4
votes
1answer
371 views

The difference between “pressured” and “pressurised”

I often hear people talk of being pressurised into doing something, but I'm almost certain this is incorrect. A can of deodorant is pressurised, or a tin of beer, since in both cases the release of ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Proper pronunciation of the short a

When I hear the "short a" vowel pronounced it doesn't seem as fronted as it should. (I'm talking about the vowel found in words such as bad, lamp, clam, crash, usually transcribed with /æ/ in the IPA, ...
6
votes
3answers
503 views

Is there an American English equivalent for the British “moggie” for a non-purebred cat?

I'm an American (and fond of cats). I'm familiar with the British term "moggie" for a non-purebred cat--basically the equivalent of "mutt" for a dog. I've never heard any American English equivalent ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Units are proper or common nouns?

Are units like newton, metre etc considered as proper or common noun?
0
votes
0answers
48 views

The 1st time + he went (had gone?)

I wonder why the writer didn´t use the past perfect tense in these sentences. 1) The 1st time he went (had gone?) to the ocean was when he went to the Black Sea. 2) The 1st time a German ship was ...
-1
votes
1answer
196 views

Why do some words exist in British English but not American English? [closed]

Thinking about the word "rubbish" which is widely used in the UK while non-existent in the USA, how do such words surface in Britain but not America? I read somewhere that American English is closer ...
3
votes
1answer
132 views

Linking /r/ and elision

In one of my lectures after learning about several processes of connected speech (namely assimilation, elision and linking) we were faced with a transcription exercise with which I have slight problem ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

What is a bogan called in the UK? [duplicate]

In Australia, "bogan" is used to describe a person who is uncouth and rather unsophisticated and considered lower class. However, "bogan" is not necessarily offensive - some people pride themselves ...
2
votes
2answers
88 views

In English language acquisition, is it really important to stick to any standard accent?

English, as a global language, has unavoidably a lot of varieties. When we learn English do we really have to stick to one specific variety ? If yes why and which?
0
votes
1answer
4k views

What does it mean “up to much”?

A British guy ask me on fb Up to much? How should I respond to it?
1
vote
2answers
59 views

A concise equivalent of a phrase meaning “to be pulled in turns by two subjects”

I am writng a personal statement for a degree in game development and would like to begin with a decisive and concise statement. I wanted to express something like: before discovering myself in ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

What is the rule for pronouncing the “a”? [duplicate]

While British people mostly seem to speak a hard "a", American people tend to make an "ae" in some cases. Here are some examples of what I mean, grouped by pattern: glass/grass cast/past/vast/...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

“I undertake that …” or “I undertake to …”

Suppose I want to give an assurance. Which one is correct? I undertake that I will give you your money as soon as I get home I undertake to give you your money as soon as I get home
1
vote
0answers
29 views

What do we got? [duplicate]

What do we got? In vernacular American speech, I have heard this structure several times. A search in COCA yields 36 results for "what do we got" and 107 results for "what do you got". This is what ...
1
vote
1answer
683 views

Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?
1
vote
1answer
177 views

In British English, is there a difference between a match and fixture in football?

Or are they synonyms? My guess is that fixtures are matches that haven't been played yet...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

BrE: monophthong in here, clear, mere, etc

Usually in BrE words like clear, fere, clear, mere, etc are pronounced with a diphthong comprising an open high front vowel followed by something resembling a schwa. However, they are sometimes ...
3
votes
1answer
83 views

Is “all together” a valid alternative to “altogether” in US English? [closed]

I'm British. I am editing a document, and I was going to correct a use of "all together" where the author clearly meant "altogether" (as in "entirely"). But then I realised this might just be a ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

what is the meaning of “co-indexed” in English?

I know that English people use "co-" prefix to show something is "joint" or "jointly Verb" with something else . But I encountered a key sentence in a article and I cannot understand it well: "we ...
3
votes
2answers
369 views

“Quite” American vs British English

In looking at the answers for this question, Using "quite" with a noun, it occurred to me that "quite," although having a dictionary definition, might be used differently by AmE and BrE ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

Douglas Adams and his foibles. This one is for the Brits, I think

There are a few versions of the Hitchhiker's Guide series, with slight differences here and there. (I'll read anything, by the way, and I do find certain passages from the series absolutely delightful,...
0
votes
3answers
706 views

“Authorization” vs “Authorisation” - I'm in some real dilemma [closed]

I'm writing a professional business-related project summary, whereby half of the clientele is in the U.S while the other half of the same business is in the U.K. - and I don't want to disappoint ...