This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
0answers
48 views

Proper pronunciation of the short a

When I hear the "short a" vowel pronounced it doesn't seem as fronted as it should. (I'm talking about the vowel found in words such as bad, lamp, clam, crash, usually transcribed with /æ/ in the IPA, ...
6
votes
3answers
497 views

Is there an American English equivalent for the British “moggie” for a non-purebred cat?

I'm an American (and fond of cats). I'm familiar with the British term "moggie" for a non-purebred cat--basically the equivalent of "mutt" for a dog. I've never heard any American English equivalent ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Units are proper or common nouns?

Are units like newton, metre etc considered as proper or common noun?
0
votes
0answers
46 views

The 1st time + he went (had gone?)

I wonder why the writer didn´t use the past perfect tense in these sentences. 1) The 1st time he went (had gone?) to the ocean was when he went to the Black Sea. 2) The 1st time a German ship was ...
-1
votes
1answer
185 views

Why do some words exist in British English but not American English? [closed]

Thinking about the word "rubbish" which is widely used in the UK while non-existent in the USA, how do such words surface in Britain but not America? I read somewhere that American English is closer ...
3
votes
1answer
121 views

Linking /r/ and elision

In one of my lectures after learning about several processes of connected speech (namely assimilation, elision and linking) we were faced with a transcription exercise with which I have slight problem ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

What is a bogan called in the UK? [duplicate]

In Australia, "bogan" is used to describe a person who is uncouth and rather unsophisticated and considered lower class. However, "bogan" is not necessarily offensive - some people pride themselves ...
2
votes
2answers
87 views

In English language acquisition, is it really important to stick to any standard accent?

English, as a global language, has unavoidably a lot of varieties. When we learn English do we really have to stick to one specific variety ? If yes why and which?
0
votes
1answer
2k views

What does it mean “up to much”?

A British guy ask me on fb Up to much? How should I respond to it?
1
vote
2answers
58 views

A concise equivalent of a phrase meaning “to be pulled in turns by two subjects”

I am writng a personal statement for a degree in game development and would like to begin with a decisive and concise statement. I wanted to express something like: before discovering myself in ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

What is the rule for pronouncing the “a”? [duplicate]

While British people mostly seem to speak a hard "a", American people tend to make an "ae" in some cases. Here are some examples of what I mean, grouped by pattern: glass/grass ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

“I undertake that …” or “I undertake to …”

Suppose I want to give an assurance. Which one is correct? I undertake that I will give you your money as soon as I get home I undertake to give you your money as soon as I get home
1
vote
0answers
29 views

What do we got? [duplicate]

What do we got? In vernacular American speech, I have heard this structure several times. A search in COCA yields 36 results for "what do we got" and 107 results for "what do you got". This is what ...
1
vote
1answer
437 views

Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?
1
vote
1answer
157 views

In British English, is there a difference between a match and fixture in football?

Or are they synonyms? My guess is that fixtures are matches that haven't been played yet...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

BrE: monophthong in here, clear, mere, etc

Usually in BrE words like clear, fere, clear, mere, etc are pronounced with a diphthong comprising an open high front vowel followed by something resembling a schwa. However, they are sometimes ...
3
votes
1answer
83 views

Is “all together” a valid alternative to “altogether” in US English? [closed]

I'm British. I am editing a document, and I was going to correct a use of "all together" where the author clearly meant "altogether" (as in "entirely"). But then I realised this might just be a ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

what is the meaning of “co-indexed” in English?

I know that English people use "co-" prefix to show something is "joint" or "jointly Verb" with something else . But I encountered a key sentence in a article and I cannot understand it well: "we ...
3
votes
2answers
339 views

“Quite” American vs British English

In looking at the answers for this question, Using "quite" with a noun, it occurred to me that "quite," although having a dictionary definition, might be used differently by AmE and BrE ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

Douglas Adams and his foibles. This one is for the Brits, I think

There are a few versions of the Hitchhiker's Guide series, with slight differences here and there. (I'll read anything, by the way, and I do find certain passages from the series absolutely ...
0
votes
3answers
374 views

“Authorization” vs “Authorisation” - I'm in some real dilemma [closed]

I'm writing a professional business-related project summary, whereby half of the clientele is in the U.S while the other half of the same business is in the U.K. - and I don't want to disappoint ...
4
votes
2answers
144 views

'to blind someone with science' — Not known or rare in the US?

This definition states (my emphasis) blind with science (British & Australian) if you blind someone with science, you confuse them by using technical language that they are not likely to ...
8
votes
5answers
1k views

How to express someone's height in metric

If someone is 169cm tall, what is the most common way of saying their height in metres and centimetres in American/Australian/British English? I'm not interested in converting metres (meters) and ...
2
votes
1answer
152 views

Difference in usage of “all right”, “ok”, “very well”

When I agree with doing something annoying or what I originally didn't want to do is there a difference between starting the reply with: "all right", "ok", "very well" or others? Does "very well" ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

What's an appropriate response to a British person asking “You alright?”

I've heard this phrase from various British people: "You alright" (comes out as a slurred "y'rite") and I'm always a bit confused on how to respond. From context, it seems to have two meanings ...
1
vote
0answers
73 views

“He could do X for England”. Are there similar expressions in other parts of the English-speaking world to this derogatory sentence?

In Reginald Hill's Dalziel and Pascoe novels, I've read the phrase: "He could [do x] for England. It is always derogatory. It is a lovely phrase! Because I can't put my finger on a quote from these ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

Manuals of Style and Typography for British and American English [closed]

I would like to know which manuals of style and typography are the most common ones for British and American English. I am interested in the basic manuals and the manuals for technical scientists ...
7
votes
9answers
366 views

BrEng expressions to describe a man who is becoming stupid

I'm searching for British English expressions describing a person who starts to be stupid, crazy or foolish. I mean something like the idiom to lose one's head and epithets like: You fool! Are there ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the expression “one's cup of tea” used in American English?

OK, the Free Dictionary defines this as one's cup of tea: Something that is in accord with one's liking or taste. For example, Quiz shows are just my cup of tea, or Baseball is not her cup of tea. ...
1
vote
2answers
137 views

What does “betraying the fact” mean?

I'm reading a BBC article on ketamine abuse. In the article it says: The doors at the Baiyun drug rehabilitation clinic are always locked, betraying the fact that the patients inside aren't ...
1
vote
2answers
122 views

A word for the condition of being blasé

Is there a word in English that encapsulates the condition of being blasé, sort of in the same vein as "weariness" encapsulates the condition of being weary? blasé: having or showing a lack of ...
0
votes
2answers
529 views

The exact meaning of “Enquiries Over $xxx,xxx”

I often see "Enquiries Over $xxx,xxx" in real estate ads, e.g. "Enquiries Over $500,000". Does the "over" literally mean offers should be above the figure (or don't bother approaching the seller), ...
3
votes
1answer
284 views

Why the does 'tu' get pronounced 'tyu' in British English?

Despite being a native Brit, I've always found it an oddity that words like "tutor", "tube", "tumour", and "duty" are pronounced as "tyutor", "tyube", "tyumour", and "duty" in British English. For me, ...
1
vote
2answers
103 views

Equivalent AmEnglish expression of BrEnglish slang term “cheeky”

I play an online game with a group of people, one of whom is UK-based. He was going out of town for several days, so he told us to "feel free to do a cheeky quest" without him. What does the word ...
1
vote
1answer
154 views

Hospital versus *the* hospital [duplicate]

One oddity in the difference between UK and American usage is that Americans say "I went to the hospital" but British people say "I went to hospital". Is there an explanation for this grammatical ...
6
votes
1answer
221 views

Why in Britain do we stop for a 'coffee', but a 'cup of tea'?

In polite company in Britain one asks ones guest if they have time for a coffee - usually if it is morning. But if it is afternoon one would ask them if they would like a cup of tea. Now this is not ...
3
votes
1answer
324 views

How the British pronounce “want”?

I'm not a native English speaker, so I am learning the pronunciation of words mostly from using Google. The way I found how to pronounce the word "want" was more or less like how I (british-way) say ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

“Metrics” definition and usage

Does the term "metric" (or plural "metrics") apply only to the metric system, or can it be used to define something that does not apply the metric system?
-1
votes
1answer
176 views

what does it mean by 'you are onto a winner'? [closed]

Somebody explains a situation and told me that in that situation 'you are onto a winner'. what does it mean by 'you are onto a winner'?
0
votes
3answers
55 views

Synonym of keel? [closed]

What would be the synonym of keel from all three given below.I don't find any of these words related to keel..so plz tell which one is it's synonym from ascend, morose and stumble?
1
vote
1answer
93 views

Changing usage of past-perfect constructions in American and British usage

I notice a great many American speakers using the construction had loved as a preterite, that is, a simple past tense. I also hear the simple past tense used in instances in which I was taught to use ...
3
votes
1answer
120 views

What do you call this profession in English

During any cattle market (afaik) there is a guy who makes note of who bought or sold what animals at what prices and who makes sure everybody sticks to the rules. The German word for this is ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

In what country did the term “railroaded” originate?

The term "railroaded" in the sense of having something forced through, either unjustly or without proper regard for those affected, clearly has it's origins in analogy to the way early railroads were ...
0
votes
1answer
749 views

Educationist vs Educationalist [closed]

Can both the words be interchangeably? A little confused about the shades of meaning. Or is there no difference??
3
votes
1answer
62 views

Colloquial for House of Commons

In the United Kingdom, what is colloquial for House of Commons? Would you say a member addressed the House, addressed Commons, or would you also say he or she addressed the House of Commons?
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Is “little does he know” correct?

This expression is usually used in past tense ("little did he know") but can it also be used in present tense?
0
votes
1answer
52 views

Present participle - seeing [closed]

I red somewhere that "see" doesn't form present participle. Is it true? For exemple in sentence: I'm seeing my doctor today. We use -ing form. Can we call it present participle in sentence or ...
2
votes
1answer
129 views

In British English, when speaking of, or to medical doctors, when does Mr denote a higher rank than Dr? [duplicate]

My knowledge of the nuances of British English come from reading authors such as P.D.James, but I have the impression that Dr. Smith is a less eminent medical doctor than Mr. Smith. Was this so, and ...
43
votes
16answers
7k views

Is “act like a mensch” too localized for ELU readers (U.S. and/or British English)?

This question was motivated by an interesting comment that was made at http://academia.stackexchange.com/posts/comments/123681?noredirect=1 Part of Answer: I don't think that particular research ...