This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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0answers
15 views

Purpose of Subjunctive Past [duplicate]

What is exactly a subjunctive past? When do we use it? Could anyone please give some examples of the occasions we use the Subjunctive Past?
2
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3answers
237 views

How to explain “Cool” to a Briton

I was recently having a conversation with a friend from England. During the conversation I described someone as being cool, but he seemed confused by the term and asked me what I meant. I couldn't ...
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1answer
12k views

(UK-US English) If “mom = mother” then why “mum” isn't “muther”? [closed]

So, I've noticed something weird. People who speak US English say Mom. Mom represents the word "mother". People who speak UK English say Mum. Mum also represents the word "mother". Why isn't it ...
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1answer
198 views

Why are doctors addressed as Mr. in the UK?

In the US most physicians, surgeons and dentists are addressed as "doctor". Very few other professionals receive the same title. In the UK, however, surgeons and dentists seem to prefer to be ...
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3answers
160 views

“Can I help you, love?” Love as a form of address: is it used regionally to talk to strangers?

I've been reading a chapter about the vocabulary of the Yorkshire dialect in the UK. Among other interesting curiosities ("child" plural "childer", "lad and lass" for "son an daughter") I've come ...
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4answers
223 views

Did I show you my graduation photo or have I shown you my graduation photo?

So I was on my way home from school, and I overheard two people talking about something. The one asked the other: ''Did I show you my graduation photo?'', I asked my self whether it shouldn't be ...
3
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3answers
173 views

Congestion/queue signs on British roads

On British roads (especially dual carriageways or motorways), signs indicating heavy traffic are a regular occurrence. The most common ones are: Congestion caution Congestion ahead Congestion after ...
3
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1answer
113 views

Can you have a strong milky coffee?

At work today a debate got rather heated between myself and a colleague, so I've turned to stack overflow. He says that if you have a lot coffee and a lot of milk its a strong milky coffee. My ...
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1answer
127 views

practice vs practise sentence question [closed]

Do both these sentences work? (British form) she needs more English practice. she needs more English practise.
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3answers
1k views

What is the origin of “have a gander”? (When meaning “look”.)

The phrase "have a gander" meaning "have a look" is common in the UK. (Also can be "have a goosey gander" or just "have a goosey".) What is the origin/meaning of this phrase? I always assumed that it ...
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0answers
68 views

Using hyphens in numbers (British English)

I heard that there is some recent rule which says that you shouldn't hyphenate numbers such as "twenty-two". Is this true?
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1answer
74 views

How is “whinge” pronounced? [closed]

I once noticed somebody spelled "whine" as "whinge" and thought it was an egregious and hilarious typo. But it turns out that "whinge" is an acceptable spelling among writers of the "Queen's" ...
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3answers
452 views

Help me understand this article

I read this article about 5 times and looked up every word I don't understand and I still am completely clueless as to what exactly is the article talking about(the topic). It really irritates me and ...
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1answer
100 views

When do you use middle and when center?

The other day I was talking to a friend about when to use "middle" or "center". I was using it in the context of top, middle, bottom, as a listing, and he suggested it should be top, center, bottom. ...
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2answers
159 views

Please help me explain the grammatical error

I don't think the following sentence is correct: "Your English is terrible regardless of where you derive.", but my elementary school English lessons have worn thin over the years. The closest I can ...
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0answers
32 views

Referral Campaigns or Your Referral Schemes

I have a referral program which comprises of 50% UK users and 50% US users. Taking into account location, what would be the most appropriate title to use... Your Referral Campaigns Or Your ...
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2answers
2k views

When did people start “boinking”?

Is "boinking" an onomatopoeic and/or a blend word? I would have said so, I believe the word boink refers to the sound of the mattress springs squeaking under the weight of a couple making love. A ...
27
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4answers
2k views

Why are Leicester & co pronounced as they are?

What is the origin of the pronunciation of words like Leicester, Gloucester, Worcestershire? Presumably, the spelling predates the pronunciation but what is the history here? What language do the ...
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1answer
64 views

What does “Thanks! Sounds like XYZ forgetting that he’s changed teams to me” mean? [closed]

XYZ has been transfered to other team.After seeing his behaviour(I gave him hints), my boss sent me. "Thanks! Sounds like XYZ forgetting that he’s changed teams to me". What does it mean?
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3answers
2k views

Did Sir Arthur Conan Doyle coin the proverb “A change is as good as a rest”?

The proverb a change is as good as a rest is defined by Oxford Dictionaries as: A change of work or occupation can be as restorative or refreshing as a period of relaxation Cambridge ...
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1answer
3k views

BrEng: “pull your finger out”, “cock up” and “stuff it” What do they mean?

In the British sitcom, The Thin Blue Line, Detective Grim makes three intelligently crafted sentences, which are given below. What do they mean? It's my arse on the line, so you better pull your ...
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2answers
75 views

To sightsee …or ..to go sightseeing?

How common is it, nowadays, to say that one 'sightsees', rather than 'goes sightseeing'?
9
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4answers
1k views

Usage of “fanny” as verb

I am not a native English speaker, hence please bear with me. I understand that fanny means mess around and waste time. Can someone suggest how I might make a sentence which uses fanny, as an ...
2
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0answers
37 views

May you pass me - Will you pass me [duplicate]

My Grandchildren say "May you pass the salt" etc. They say their teachers say this is ok. To me it sounds very clumsy and I had never heard it used except by them. They have grown in Wiltshire while ...
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3answers
582 views

Why is the surname Gray more common than the surname Grey in the UK?

An EL&U question from 2010 asks Which is the correct spelling: "grey" or "gray"? The answers very sensibly point out the split between the UK and former British commonwealth ...
3
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1answer
103 views

Can someone please explain the need of quotes in the following text?

I saw this as a slogan in an episode of Drop the Dead Donkey and just wanted to know why were quotes needed on the word synergise: Let nowness "synergise" with excellence. I think it makes sense ...
3
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1answer
18k views

How do I use “as of now” correctly?

Just to clarify, I am not a native English speaker. I occasionally hear from other non-native English speakers the use of the phrase: "As of now" with the meaning of Currently. Initially I did not ...
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1answer
147 views

Dropping the '-ly' in adverbs used in a negative response to a question

Two British gangsters riding in London traffic. One says: 'Have you seen him?' Other says: 'Not recent. One says: 'do you still go there?' Other says: 'Not regular.' Is this a colloquialism, idiom or ...
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6answers
521 views

Why does “smashing” mean “very good”?

Smashing is a BrE slang which means "very good" or "impressive". Most folks might know this already, due to its use as a catch phrase by various BrE characters in media. However, from the usual ...
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1answer
127 views

How would a king have phrased “I need to use the bathroom”? [closed]

With literary or historical references, what phrase would an English-speaking monarch have used to indicate to either their attendants or to their court that they were in need of using the toilet ...
27
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8answers
3k views

How did “stuck-up” get to mean “snob”?

I was inclined to believe that the expression "stuck-up", meaning staying aloof from others because one thinks one is superior, had its origins with somebody's nose stuck (up) in the air and yet, ...
1
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1answer
105 views

What is the difference between Anglia and England?

What is the difference between Anglia and England? When it's used. Some examples of modern usages: probably coincident, but Anglia in Polish language is England, there are regions called East ...
2
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1answer
114 views

Omission of 'for' with various quantified time intervals: influence of verb

I came across these two examples, given to illustrate 'a case' where the inclusion of the preposition for is considered optional in the paper "Acquisition of Preposition Deletion by Non-native ...
3
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2answers
106 views

Meaning of Science Block (British English)

In the British radio comedy show, Cabin Pressure, the following exchange of dialogue occurs: Martin: Your doctor? What doctor do you know? Simon: Good old Doc Smiley, of course. Martin: ...
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2answers
38 views

How to phrase “analysis into a company”

I want to say : Analysis conducted at a insurance company showed that... or Analysis into a insurance company showed that... What is the best way to phrase this?
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7answers
924 views

Eww! Has it crossed the pond yet?

I hear eww (sometimes spelt as ew) fairly regularly on American sitcoms, usually uttered by a scatterbrained beautiful blonde girl when she sees or hears something disgusting. I don't recall it ever ...
0
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2answers
66 views

If subscription is a contract to receive something, what is a contract to send something called?

I'm using the word subscription with the following meaning: subscription: an arrangement to receive something, typically a publication, regularly by paying in advance. (Definition taken from ...
3
votes
2answers
771 views

In the cards or on the cards?

This seems to be a BrE/AmE distinction - is it? And do Americans use the phrase with more of a mystical Tarot card slant, compared to its British English meaning of simply 'likely to happen'?
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0answers
24 views

Asking about date [duplicate]

I'd like to know which way of asking questions is more common in the UK. Is there any difference? 1 What is the date today or What date is today? 2 What is the day today or What day is today? ...
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0answers
35 views

When to use Might & May? [duplicate]

Is it correct to say "MIGHT I have a look around? OR "MAY" I have a look around? Which is correct and why ? Thanks
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1answer
5k views

date has already passed OR date has already past? [closed]

Which is correct : date has already passed , or date has already past ? Thanks
0
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2answers
78 views

Is checklist or tick box (or something else) more common in British English?

When referring to a list of items that you check off as you complete, would the British say, "checklist," "tick box," or something else?
2
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1answer
63 views

'Lack of Side' as used by Dick White, former Intelligence Chief of MI5 and MI6

During Dick White's post-Oxford academic career he traveled to Ann Arbor, Michigan in 1928 to continue studying history at the University of Michigan. Upon arrival at the campus White was warmly ...
3
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2answers
152 views

British usage: add verb forms of “do” after a conditional

Is it standard British usage to add forms of the verb "Do" after a conditional like "Would"? e.g., If I could, I would do"?
2
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1answer
205 views

How is the spelling of a hyphenated word read?

How is the spelling of a hyphenated word usually read out loud? For example, with "Anglo-Saxon", do we say: "It is spelt as ...
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0answers
23 views

Separate vs. joined words (hyphen or not) [duplicate]

English is not my native language, and sometimes it's confusing.. Especially uk-english vs. american and hyphens Can someone explain a bit when to use which of these? It's for a global english ...
1
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1answer
1k views

Difference between “ditch”, “trench” and “gutter” [closed]

I have been trying to understand the difference between the three, is this a usage difference between American English and British English? What is the difference?
2
votes
1answer
102 views

“Rather !” as a reply: old-fashioned? Colloquial? Unusual?

Is "Rather" as a reply (BrE), with heavy stress on the second syllable, old-fashioned ? Colloquial ? Unusual ? e.g. "Did you enjoy yourself?" "Rather!" Can "pretty much so!" be its AmE ...
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1answer
140 views

How to write the date of an event that lasts a few days [American / British English]

I saw this topic: How to write the date of an event that lasts a few days But have some questions. Firstly, I would like to know how to say the same but in British English. I think that "The event ...
2
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1answer
175 views

Meaning of “clot” in the following sentence

I've searched all of the reasonable sources for a meaning of clot as the word appears in the following sentence. I've also tracked down a couple of people who shear sheep and neither of them was able ...