This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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2answers
89 views

Equivalent AmEnglish expression of BrEnglish slang term “cheeky”

I play an online game with a group of people, one of whom is UK-based. He was going out of town for several days, so he told us to "feel free to do a cheeky quest" without him. What does the word ...
1
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1answer
100 views

Hospital versus *the* hospital [duplicate]

One oddity in the difference between UK and American usage is that Americans say "I went to the hospital" but British people say "I went to hospital". Is there an explanation for this grammatical ...
6
votes
1answer
160 views

Why in Britain do we stop for a 'coffee', but a 'cup of tea'?

In polite company in Britain one asks ones guest if they have time for a coffee - usually if it is morning. But if it is afternoon one would ask them if they would like a cup of tea. Now this is not ...
3
votes
1answer
219 views

How the British pronounce “want”?

I'm not a native English speaker, so I am learning the pronunciation of words mostly from using Google. The way I found how to pronounce the word "want" was more or less like how I (british-way) say ...
1
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1answer
42 views

“Metrics” definition and usage

Does the term "metric" (or plural "metrics") apply only to the metric system, or can it be used to define something that does not apply the metric system?
-1
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1answer
106 views

what does it mean by 'you are onto a winner'? [closed]

Somebody explains a situation and told me that in that situation 'you are onto a winner'. what does it mean by 'you are onto a winner'?
0
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3answers
54 views

Synonym of keel? [closed]

What would be the synonym of keel from all three given below.I don't find any of these words related to keel..so plz tell which one is it's synonym from ascend, morose and stumble?
1
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1answer
79 views

Changing usage of past-perfect constructions in American and British usage

I notice a great many American speakers using the construction had loved as a preterite, that is, a simple past tense. I also hear the simple past tense used in instances in which I was taught to use ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

What do you call this profession in English

During any cattle market (afaik) there is a guy who makes note of who bought or sold what animals at what prices and who makes sure everybody sticks to the rules. The German word for this is ...
3
votes
3answers
451 views

In what country did the term “railroaded” originate?

The term "railroaded" in the sense of having something forced through, either unjustly or without proper regard for those affected, clearly has it's origins in analogy to the way early railroads were ...
0
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1answer
358 views

Educationist vs Educationalist [closed]

Can both the words be interchangeably? A little confused about the shades of meaning. Or is there no difference??
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Colloquial for House of Commons

In the United Kingdom, what is colloquial for House of Commons? Would you say a member addressed the House, addressed Commons, or would you also say he or she addressed the House of Commons?
0
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1answer
450 views

Is “little does he know” correct?

This expression is usually used in past tense ("little did he know") but can it also be used in present tense?
0
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1answer
49 views

Present participle - seeing [closed]

I red somewhere that "see" doesn't form present participle. Is it true? For exemple in sentence: I'm seeing my doctor today. We use -ing form. Can we call it present participle in sentence or ...
2
votes
1answer
103 views

In British English, when speaking of, or to medical doctors, when does Mr denote a higher rank than Dr? [duplicate]

My knowledge of the nuances of British English come from reading authors such as P.D.James, but I have the impression that Dr. Smith is a less eminent medical doctor than Mr. Smith. Was this so, and ...
41
votes
16answers
7k views

Is “act like a mensch” too localized for ELU readers (U.S. and/or British English)?

This question was motivated by an interesting comment that was made at http://academia.stackexchange.com/posts/comments/123681?noredirect=1 Part of Answer: I don't think that particular research ...
-2
votes
2answers
89 views

“unreflected”, is it correct?

It seems for me that "unreflected" is not an English word. What is a good alternative for it that means "not reflected"? I need to use it in this context: "We use ... that compensates the unreflected ...
3
votes
2answers
189 views

What does it mean by “to begin my life with the beginning of my life” as in David Copperfield?

Quote from the opening of David Copperfield by Charles Dickens: Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Was “tickle (someone's) fancy” originally a double entendre?

Recently, I asked users to provide modern-day equivalents of idioms and expressions that contained the words fancy and tickle. The question is titled Whatever tickles their fancy in the US? I was ...
-1
votes
1answer
104 views

Use of 'z' versus 's' [duplicate]

I've been brought up believing that most of the words that have suffix with '-ize' or '-ized' is the American English form and the British English forms use (most of the time) '-ise' or '-ised' as the ...
2
votes
2answers
331 views

Whatever tickles their fancy in the US?

The delightful-sounding tickle your fancy is, I think, one of those rare idioms where the word order can be reversed and its meaning changes; the request: fancy a tickle? said with a raised eyebrow ...
6
votes
2answers
343 views

British English spelling: “gripped” or “gript”?

Hello what is the correct British English spelling of the word 'gripped' or 'gript'? According to Dictionary.com: gript verb 1. a past participle and simple past tense of grip. verb ...
-1
votes
1answer
225 views

Is 'gotten' a proper/legitimate word? [duplicate]

According to what I was taught as school, the past tense of 'get' is 'got' and 'gotten' is "an American corruption and, therefore, is not a proper word". Example: "Should auld acquaintance be ...
0
votes
1answer
110 views

Words play - does it have a special name in English? How to do the same with 'security' word for example?

By looking at this picture: Or at the title of this album: You can see that the authors used there something which I call a word game. My question is, does doing so has an official name? How can ...
-1
votes
1answer
60 views

Determiners in English sentence vs. plurals, singulars and zero determiners. Is it ok to say? [duplicate]

Do I need any determiners in the sentence below in general statement? Strong winds destroy homes. Is it ok to say in English in specific situation? The strong wind destroyed the homes in North ...
2
votes
2answers
92 views

Pronunciation of word “considered”

I have learned in school that letter 'r' is not sounded in the word 'considered', here's an example. But I have been watching the 'How I met your mother' series, and Ted have pronounced that with ...
1
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1answer
56 views

“Enjoin” vs “Adjure”

"Enjoin" means to direct someone with emphasis and authority. "Adjure" means to command in a serious manner. Are the two words used in different contexts?
1
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1answer
58 views

Telling the time - Minute 01 to 09 [duplicate]

What would be the most frequent/common way of telling the time when the minute is between 01 and 09? Is there any difference between BE and AmE? 5:03 -> 1) five oh three 2) five three 3) three ...
0
votes
2answers
154 views

What kind of question-tag is this: “I was in the bath, wasn't I?” Is it polite? rude?

Context: (BrE) - a friend is complaining... a- "I phoned you three times this morning but you never answered." b- "I was in the bath, wasn't I? Why the question-tag, if the listener had no idea ...
0
votes
2answers
40 views

Do noun phrases comprise prepositions too?

Do noun phrases comprise prepositions too? For example: The apple in the fridge is mine. Here the noun phrase is "The apple in the fridge" or just "The apple"?
1
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4answers
547 views

“I usually knock off at 6”

"I usually knock off at 6", i heard an english gentleman say that. Does it sound odd only to me? In fact, what I heard was "I usually masturbate at 6" Did some research: found a book (i'm guessing ...
1
vote
2answers
83 views

Combining two sentences for title

I want to combine the following sentence: Relationship between son and mother, and relationship between daughter and mother Into one sentence for title of an article: Relationship between son, ...
1
vote
1answer
244 views

How can I use the phrase, “do right by”?

1) How can I use the phrase, "do right by"? 2) And what does it mean exactly when we say that? 3) Can I say, I hope they do right by me? Or I hope he/she does right by me?
4
votes
2answers
180 views

If someone says “They insisted that he left”, is there any ambiguity in BrE or in AmE?

Do they mean something like "please go! You must leave!" or could it be "We assure you that he left"?
1
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2answers
45 views

“is much a news in the moment”?

I'm trying to understand what is said in this video between 00:27 and 00:35... I can understand the beginning, "With religion, community relations and tolerance", but... And then? I'm listening this ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Is there any authoritative source from where we can find out if a phrase or figure of speech is American English or British English? [closed]

For example the figure of speech " One swallow doesn't make a summer" is British English. Similarly the figure of speech 'All hat and no cattle" is American English. Is there any source from where ...
0
votes
1answer
250 views

Phrases used to replace“ I think” [closed]

Can anybody suggest phrases or sentences I can use instead of "I think" when it comes to giving opinions Thank you.
-1
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2answers
190 views

What is the UK-English Equivalent for “band-aid?” [closed]

What is the UK-English equivalent for "band-aid?" That is, the bandage one puts over cuts and the like?
0
votes
1answer
66 views

What are lexemes and morphemes? [closed]

I am preparing for my TOEFL test and want to increase my vocabulary. Can anybody please tell me what lexemes and morphemes are, and why they are important? I have Googled the terms but I need the ...
2
votes
2answers
104 views

What is the grammar of these two sentence from 'The Economist'?

To arrive at an answer, Mr Harris combs through what remains of our pre-internet lives, separating the things we will carry forward into the connected world from the worthy things we may leave ...
-2
votes
2answers
154 views

Someone who reads too much into things or over analyses things

Is there a single word for someone who reads too much into things? Examples from the freedictionary: This statement means exactly what it says. Don't try to read anything else into it. ...
1
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2answers
4k views

In what English-speaking communities does “trump” refer to the breaking of wind?

It is clear from this site that the verb to trump has been used extensively across Britain to refer to the breaking of wind. It is especially the case in the North, in Wales and certainly in Norfolk, ...
4
votes
3answers
206 views

What word(s) do children of English native speakers use for “kid”/“child”/etc

I'm looking for (a) word(s) that is/are perceived to be child's language by adults, not words used by adults to describe children. What would be fine though are words used by adults when they are ...
-2
votes
1answer
75 views

We like a name but dont know how to spell it? [closed]

We like the sound of Mill-eat-a but dont know how to spell it so that shortens to Millie and not milie as in cyrus
4
votes
2answers
646 views

Did the modern British accent originate from a speech impediment? [closed]

I have heard a theory that the modern British pronunciation (as compared, for example, to American pronunciation) started when somebody in the monarchy had a speech impediment (perhaps rhotacism) and, ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Is it acceptable to make a question by adding “or” at the end?

Example: "It is unacceptable for young ladies to put up their bare feet in public railway carriages, or?" I only ask because the germans do it all the time as in: "Ich habe dir schon einmal darum ...
2
votes
1answer
76 views

Are there linguistic markers that indicate to subordinates a desire to be addressed less formally

It's a bit of a shame that Is "pal" too informal when the other person is much older than me? was closed, as it dabbles in a difficult topic for all non-native speakers of English. Although ...
9
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4answers
2k views

50s synonym for “snogging”

What would the British term in 1954 have been for "snogging"? "Making out" is American. "All over each other" doesn't seem quite specific enough.
3
votes
3answers
160 views

Can there be a difference between learned and learnt?

To the best of my knowledge, there is no difference in meaning between learnt and the single-syllable form of learned. This is supported by the answers to When do you use "learnt" and when "learned"? ...
1
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6answers
137 views

Looking for a word like “eulogy”, but for a person that has not died?

I was thinking of words like the "background" of a person? Their overall qualities summarised into a short form. Eulogy might be a bad example, as it implies praise. A word meaning "a summary of ...