This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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0answers
43 views

Creating a word for a child of a parent-word

I have a word for example, Scope, that I'd like to make a child word for the same thing, I thought "ette" as a suffix would be appropriate. A Scope of a Scope would be a Scopelette, for example. ...
3
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1answer
77 views

Is “go exercising” ungrammatical or non-standard?

Friends, I think the phrase "go exercise" is spoken in colloquial English. But I can still find the phrase "go exercising," even in Google books. Like the excerpt below: I like to exercise, but ...
1
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1answer
60 views

“You are spoilt” or “You are spoiled”

When helping my son with the homework in (non-native) English, I got stuck by sentence. What is correct: "You are spoilt!" or "You are spoiled!" or both alternatives? If it matters, this part ...
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2answers
51 views

Which one is correct ? Do you know english better than me or Are you know english better than me? [closed]

Which one is correct ? a) Do you know english better than me ? b) Are you know english better than me ?
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2answers
328 views

Is “hail from (somewhere)” necessarily formal English?

Macmillan dictionary says hail from is "formal". link Cambridge dictionary notes hail from as "formal" in British English but doesn't say this for American English. link Oxford Learners ...
0
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3answers
101 views

Single word for “very centered around one opinion”

What is a word for someone who is very centered around one opinion, and is reluctant to others? I keep going back to absent-minded or reluctant to change, but I know there is a word that is more ...
2
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2answers
50 views

Sentence phrasing 'Please don't punish/scold/penalize' [closed]

Situation: I technician came to my house for installation/demo or Refrigerator. He was good but forgot to install a 'rat mesh' ( protect machine from rats). I called customer care to inform the ...
-2
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2answers
50 views

Possibly convoluted sentence, but is it correct? [closed]

I saw this sentence in an email — is it actually correct? In light of the time and effort you have spent and may otherwise continue to spend on dealing with their repeated requests for assistance, ...
3
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1answer
151 views

“vastly” for “to a [very] great degree; extremely” in contexts not involving comparison or measurement: BrEng vs. AmEng usage

Does using vastly to mean to a [very] great degree; extremely in contexts not involving measurement or comparison, now sound common and idiomatic to British ears, or is it still likely to be ...
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0answers
42 views

Usage of “bottle it” to refer to being in a position to win, but losing [closed]

This BBC Sport web page has the following text at 14:11: Umair Gooner Ahmed: Pakistan just done an Arsenal and bottled it. This answer has a meaning for "bottling it" of not being brave ...
6
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3answers
112 views

Ironic phrase for something becoming more complicated specifically because of efforts to 'simplify' it?

My linguistic skills fail me and I'd like some advice. I have a project that currently works exactly as intended, short and sweet, yet a higher up has changed their mind and are asking for it to be ...
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11answers
3k views

What do you call the space where you park a car? Parking spot, space, bay or what?

I am looking for the correct/common way to call the single spaces which are generally clearly visibile in parking lots as you can see from the picture: I would probably call them "parking ...
2
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1answer
88 views

Operator: “Are you through, Sir?” - AmEng vs. BrEng

In the context of a telephone call via an operator-assisted service, is it fact that in AmEng, if the operator asks the service user (caller) if they are through, what is meant by that is, are you ...
7
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2answers
153 views

AmEng equivalent for BrEng “decorator”

Oxford Dictionaries Online defines [interior] decorator as follows: 1.1 chiefly North American A person whose job is to design the interior of someone’s home, by choosing colors, carpets, ...
0
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1answer
47 views

Position of question mark after a quotation (that is not itself a question) and a citation [duplicate]

In British English, where should one place the question mark in the following sentence? Was it true that "the food was all gone" (Bloggs, 2013, p. 287) Inside the quotation marks, after them, or ...
1
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0answers
27 views

Bust confusions? [closed]

I'm wondering if we can say 'bust confusions', as in the title 'Common Grammar Confusions Busted!' Thank you! Yatt
1
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1answer
47 views

Is there a verb similar to ‘to greet’ used when people depart?

I am looking for words analogous to ‘to greet’ and ‘greeter’, to use about people as they depart. I may say: Claire stands at the entrance and greets people as they arrive. She is a greeter. I want ...
0
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2answers
92 views

What is the equivalent to “wise guy” in British English? [closed]

How would I say "wise guy" (as in gangster/mafia speak) if I was in London, England? Wise guy is a very american phrase, so what would be the Equivalent in Britain london??
2
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1answer
59 views

Is it formal or informal to use y/o as an abbreviation of “years old”? [closed]

This is my first question on this site. I am not a native speaker. My question is, is it formal or informal to use y/o as an abbreviation of "years old" in British English?
1
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0answers
108 views

Why does written English have more variations in pronunciation than other languages? [closed]

According to my experience, in languages like German, French, Chinese, Japanese, etc., there are not so many exceptions in pronunciation as in English. For example, given a word in German or French, ...
-2
votes
2answers
141 views

No one knows or no one know? [closed]

Can you tell which of the following sentences are right? And explain why the others are wrong? No one knows the answer. No one know the answer. There is nobody anwering the qustion. There is nobody ...
0
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3answers
64 views

Is there a difference in pronunciation between grandma and grammar? [closed]

? Also is there a difference between morning and moaning? Assuming British as spoken in London ("Jafaican") but also interested in other dialects
3
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1answer
82 views

To light a cigarette

I've heard "to light a cigarette" being used a couple of times, but I am still in doubt about two things: Is this common both in American English and British English? Are there other ways to say it ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

The usage of “Despite the fact that” [closed]

Can I add "such as " in front of the clause like this: Despite the fact that cognition may affect many different facets of ecology in wild animals, such as, dominance, sexual selection and ...
1
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2answers
86 views

Heel of Italy in Wikipedia? [closed]

Who can describe it for me? what does mean Heel and relation to italy? the region situated on the "heel" of Italy.
0
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3answers
87 views

Is there an English word that means “to feel the call of the homeland”?

I seem to remember reading it once, sort of meaning the opposite of diaspora - once you have spread far, you would feel the X, the call to return to the homeland?
0
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1answer
61 views

In British English, do you say “in high tide” or “at high tide”?

In American English you would say, for example, "At high tide the water level would be here." Is it different in British English? I'm reading a document that says, "In high tide the water level would ...
0
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1answer
275 views

Why in British English is it “map room” (singular “map”) but “games room” (plural “games”)?

Why is it normal in British English to say map room (for a room for keeping and viewing maps in) but games room (for a room for playing games in)? To my native British ear these forms sound ...
0
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0answers
28 views

Where in the world is the term 'flatmate' used?

Here in New Zealand the term 'flatmate' is the most commonly used term to refer to the people who share a rented living arrangement, much the same way that Americans would use 'roommate'. According ...
1
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1answer
111 views

“They saw the bus to come to the station.” What is wrong with this sentence? [closed]

Please, correct (if it needs) this sentence: They saw the bus to come to the station. Should I use to here?
1
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3answers
64 views

Operating System Concept, A Translation is need? [closed]

Who can translate the following sentence in a simple manner? Between garbage collections free space will build up, which cannot be reclaimed until the next time the garbage collector runs. This ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Is it grammatically correct help me ,with proper explanation,with tense explanation [closed]

You were got bored, weren't you? It that correct ,can we use all verbs in past tense.
1
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1answer
95 views

Is “maiden speech” regarded as politically incorrect?

Some people use "inaugural speech" instead of maiden speech. For example, from the Twitter account of the Australian Sex Party: From one year ago, the Inaugural Speech of @FionaPattenMLC ...
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0answers
74 views

How do the British pronounce these names? [closed]

Leif, as in Leif Ericsson; Elise, I know the British pronounce Denise like "dih-'neez"; Gisele; and Gisela
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2answers
38 views

"Proper Cheerio”: Proper?

A call to BrE speakers: A television outlet in NE US is advertising a gala fundraising event coinciding with the finale of the Downton Abbey television series in the States. Sunday, March 6, 2016 ...
10
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2answers
1k views

What does “a bit of a tartar” mean?

Recently, a woman I know who lives in England (OK, she's my fiancee, if you want to know), wrote to me and described someone she knows as "a bit of a tartar". Now in context it seemed like a friendly ...
0
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2answers
130 views

One Word : What do you call who chill / relax a lot? [closed]

I need one word for people who chill / party / relax / play games / travel and just chill most of the time. Some Word like 'Freizeit' , but it needs to be used as a noun for persons (eg, traveller, a ...
12
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2answers
1k views

Is “chaperon” versus “chaperone” a US versus British English thing?

I've noticed that "chaperone" can also be spelt "chaperon", without the "e" at the end. Is this a case of American English simplifying a British English word, or something else? The original French ...
0
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0answers
136 views

I wouldn't vs I'd not

I'm defending my word choice to an editor in a novel I've written. There are two points of view: one is a native Irish speaker, and the other, an American born and raised here. They're both eighteen. ...
3
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2answers
172 views

must vs have to: British usage and academic rules

I am teaching 'have to' vs 'must' (British English usage) and, according to the book, the difference is as follows: must: it's necessary to do it (because the speaker says so) have to: it's ...
0
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0answers
35 views

Why do some people drop “the” when saying “At The Hospital”? [duplicate]

Frequently I hear friends saying "He was in Hospital". Here in Texas, and elsewhere in the US, we typically say "He was in the hospital". Any reason for the discrepancy?
0
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3answers
100 views

'Go to sleep' vs 'Go and sleep'?

I just had a linguistics test (it's called UKLO) that measures you're ability to problem solve and translate languages you know nothing about. For one of my translation answers I wrote 'Don't go and ...
5
votes
3answers
300 views

Dinner at mine or yours?

I have noticed in British TV shows the common usage of 'mine' or 'yours' being used to mean 'my place' and 'your place' respectively. I spent a year in Britain in the early 1980s and I don't recall ...
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1answer
91 views

Why 'Germanic Languages' and 'Germanic Tribes'?

I've never been a fan of the word 'Germanic' and it's use to cover all Northern European (except the so-called 'Celtic Fringe') Tribes due to it's overtly political connotations. Can anyone tell me ...
0
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1answer
57 views

Present Perfect Simple vs Past Simple [closed]

How much has it cost? My father has paid for it. That's why I don't know its price. vs How much did it cost? My father paid for it. That's why I don't know its price. Which one is more ...
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2answers
74 views

What do we mean by the phrase 'conventions of standard written English' [closed]

A question came and it had one of its options: correct according to conventions of standard English. I don't remember the question but the question was from a grammar section. I do not have an idea ...
0
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1answer
35 views

Would it be more correct to say “active winter holidays” or “winter activity holidays”? [closed]

I have seen both phrases used by tourism websites. Are both correct?
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3answers
121 views

What is the etymology of the term “form factor”?

I'm a theoretical physicist, and am doing some work on quantities called form factors. To an expert, a form factor says something about scattering particles from fields. This probably originated from ...
3
votes
1answer
67 views

What does it mean to “take the mickey out of” something?

I am a Yank. I have a friend who lives in the UK, in Sussex. She writes: Mike and Rose are pretty good, but they tend to take the mickey out of my inadequacies. Mike and Rose are her ...
0
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3answers
150 views

What are other words for a collection of beautiful things?

I am looking for a word or term for a collection of beautiful things. Of either intrinsic value or even along the lines of 'a whole that is made of a sum of valuable parts'. Not necessarily in any ...