This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

6
votes
1answer
57 views

Pronouncing the definite article

The definite article is mostly pronounced 'thuh' before a noun beginning with a consonant (thuh chair), and 'thee' in front of a noun beginning with a vowel (thee apple). Question 1: what is the name ...
2
votes
3answers
132 views

Femicide vs feminicide

While using the term femicide I realised that the is another term, probably a synonym, feminicide. From the following Wikipedia extract, the two terms appear to be synonyms: Femicide or ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Difference between “Shut the door will you please” and “May we have the door shut please?”

To whom do you think a speaker might use the following requests to have the door shut? Shut the door will you please. May we have the door shut please?
45
votes
3answers
3k views

What does “trodie” mean?

In "The Star Fraction" by Ken MacLeod, a Scottish science fiction author, a couple walks through a street and past a "trodie". The novel is set in Britain, so it may be a British expression. The ...
4
votes
0answers
131 views

Crepi il lupo in English? [closed]

What is the English version of the Italian: "In bocca al lupo / Crepi"Crepi il lupo"? Is this correct?: "Good luck! / Cracks the wolf"
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Is “mail” still used for “international correspondence” in British English?

While pondering this question asked earlier today, I started to wonder why post (in the sense of correspondence) is used in British English but not American English. So I looked up the etymology of ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

The usage of “Per se”

Is the usage of the phrase "Per se" correct in this sentence? Sometimes, religion, though not be enaugh per se, may lead to violence.
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Word that Resembles The Dutch Word Kudde

Kudde, Couth, is there an english farmers word that resembles Kudde. Kudde means herd, flock, fold, drove, livestock, and bevy. So I'm looking for a word that means something along the lines of ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

How will “winning” be percieved?

If I use the phrase "winning business" as a byline to a logo. How will it generally be percieved? 1) Like a winning business 2) Like the act of winning business 3) Doesn't make any sense to have ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

x-stor(e)y or x-floor or x-level house/building?

Which is the correct for British English? I need the correct for both a separate house and an apartment building, if this makes difference. I can't find any concrete answer online.
0
votes
0answers
19 views

May “in with” be used to mean “among?”

I was thinking about how little I use the word among and how I would phrase the dictionary's example sentences for it. Most of it involved substitution with the word with. Then I noticed something. ...
2
votes
2answers
82 views

How offensive is calling someone “dodgy”?

Labour MP Dennis Skinner has been suspended from Parliament for the day for calling the Prime Minister "Dodgy Dave". I would like to know how serious of an insult it is. Can you put this insult to ...
4
votes
3answers
935 views

What are people, male or female, working in a Brothel, called?

They sure are not called call girls or hookers (absolutely not!). I don't believe "call girls" because these are people working in an establishment, right there, not making calls, not that 'kind'. ...
0
votes
2answers
87 views

What do you call a student who studies extra at home to become proficient?

What is the British English term for someone (a student) who goes home after classes and practices the lesson learned that day, or becomes proficient in the lesson taught? It is not a positive ...
6
votes
5answers
658 views

J. Oliver's usage of the word 'bog'

I have a question about the usage of the word 'bog' in the following sentence: Bog standard scoops of ice cream etc I understand that the meaning is 'form'; nevertheless, this is the first time ...
2
votes
2answers
96 views

polite questions vs. direct questions: real life reactions [closed]

In English courses (especially business), we learn to use polite questions. So we know that you shouldn't say "excuse me... where's the nearest supermarket, please?" but rather "excuse me... do you ...
-1
votes
2answers
70 views

What is the origin of the British English saying: “It's got bits missing”?

I know someone from England who says this, in such a way that she assumes I have heard it, and that many people she knows say it... I find it amusing because it contrasts its Got with Missing. (She ...
2
votes
2answers
135 views

'café' pronunciation

I've found recently a second variant of pronunciation of 'cafe' word: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/cafe. The usual one is /ˈkafeɪ/ ˈkæ-'fay But the OD link gives this too: /...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

What does “in the corner, undone” mean?

(I'm guessing this is some British slang for being in jail or dead?) From the lyrics of Mika's "Dr. John": I look for joy in a strange place From the back of the bar From afar I see ...
2
votes
1answer
79 views

Is “a few street away” a grammatically acceptable idiomatic expression in some dialect of UK English?

I am an American and I am reading a book titled Bloodmage by a British author named Stephen Aryan. He uses expressions I was previously unfamiliar with, such as "sat" instead of "sitting" (i.e., "sat ...
0
votes
1answer
133 views

Is “take a bath” or “bathe” used to mean “take a shower” in some English dialects?

By analogy with Portuguese tomar banho [de chuveiro/ducha], which along with tomar uma ducha/chuveirada (Br.)/duche (Port.) means, take a shower, are there any parts of the English speaking world in ...
1
vote
0answers
74 views

For how long has “as” been synonymous with “because” in British English?

In British English, it seems that "because" can always be replaced with "as." Here is an example of "as" meaning "because" in British English: I popped down to the shops as we were out of loo roll....
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Difference between 'REVERENCE' and 'DEFERENCE'

MY EFFORT: this a straight-forward question. I was practising for 'SAT' and met a question which required knowledge of difference between the afore-mentioned two words. I have searched the following 2 ...
-1
votes
2answers
84 views

Why can't I use “have” in given example? [closed]

How come in following sentence "have" is an incorrect word to use and "has" is correct one? "Working for many years in academic and administration fields have not only contributed to my professional ...
3
votes
1answer
70 views

What does it mean to “feel Humpty”?

I was reading a book written in the UK and a character stated that speaking to her sister made her "feel Humpty". I am not sure what she was feeling, as the rest of the dialogue gave no clue. Can ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

laden vs. loaded [closed]

I was justed asked whether it's a british idiom to say something, for example a car is 'fully laden' as in American English 'loaded' would be used. Does anyone here know about this issue? Thanks &...
10
votes
4answers
246 views

Did British chef Jamie Oliver redefine “pukka” in 1999?

Recently I've been watching cooking programmes: MasterChef Italia (addictive), MasterChef USA (awful), followed swiftly by Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares, and then onto Jamie Oliver's acclaimed The ...
2
votes
2answers
80 views

Capitalization of some common nouns in English texts

I’m a French web developer who translated a web site in English by a non-native but experienced English speaker (has lived in the US and UK for 15 years, worked in English for 20 years). I just ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

A word to describe taking pleasure in the way a word sounds

What is a word that describes one's satisfaction in the phonetics of a word? Like visual appeal of a pictures, but the audible appeal of a word.
0
votes
2answers
64 views

Word to describe the one before the last one

I have a project that requires storing a latest file, previous file and 'one before the previous' file. Each will go in its own folder named: current, previous and {one before previous}. What do I ...
7
votes
10answers
1k views

word(s) to describe someone judge others by one tiny detail

I wonder if there is a word or a few words or phases that describe a person very often: judge a person based on one or two tiny details or critise harshly over small mistakes that one made (...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Creating a word for a child of a parent-word

I have a word for example, Scope, that I'd like to make a child word for the same thing, I thought "ette" as a suffix would be appropriate. A Scope of a Scope would be a Scopelette, for example. ...
3
votes
1answer
94 views

Is “go exercising” ungrammatical or non-standard?

Friends, I think the phrase "go exercise" is spoken in colloquial English. But I can still find the phrase "go exercising," even in Google books. Like the excerpt below: I like to exercise, but ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

“You are spoilt” or “You are spoiled”

When helping my son with the homework in (non-native) English, I got stuck by sentence. What is correct: "You are spoilt!" or "You are spoiled!" or both alternatives? If it matters, this part ...
-2
votes
2answers
63 views

Which one is correct ? Do you know english better than me or Are you know english better than me? [closed]

Which one is correct ? a) Do you know english better than me ? b) Are you know english better than me ?
-1
votes
2answers
344 views

Is “hail from (somewhere)” necessarily formal English?

Macmillan dictionary says hail from is "formal". link Cambridge dictionary notes hail from as "formal" in British English but doesn't say this for American English. link Oxford Learners ...
0
votes
3answers
108 views

Single word for “very centered around one opinion”

What is a word for someone who is very centered around one opinion, and is reluctant to others? I keep going back to absent-minded or reluctant to change, but I know there is a word that is more ...
2
votes
2answers
51 views

Sentence phrasing 'Please don't punish/scold/penalize' [closed]

Situation: I technician came to my house for installation/demo or Refrigerator. He was good but forgot to install a 'rat mesh' ( protect machine from rats). I called customer care to inform the ...
-2
votes
2answers
51 views

Possibly convoluted sentence, but is it correct? [closed]

I saw this sentence in an email — is it actually correct? In light of the time and effort you have spent and may otherwise continue to spend on dealing with their repeated requests for assistance, ...
3
votes
1answer
160 views

“vastly” for “to a [very] great degree; extremely” in contexts not involving comparison or measurement: BrEng vs. AmEng usage

Does using vastly to mean to a [very] great degree; extremely in contexts not involving measurement or comparison, now sound common and idiomatic to British ears, or is it still likely to be ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Usage of “bottle it” to refer to being in a position to win, but losing [closed]

This BBC Sport web page has the following text at 14:11: Umair Gooner Ahmed: Pakistan just done an Arsenal and bottled it. This answer has a meaning for "bottling it" of not being brave ...
6
votes
3answers
124 views

Ironic phrase for something becoming more complicated specifically because of efforts to 'simplify' it?

My linguistic skills fail me and I'd like some advice. I have a project that currently works exactly as intended, short and sweet, yet a higher up has changed their mind and are asking for it to be ...
15
votes
11answers
3k views

What do you call the space where you park a car? Parking spot, space, bay or what?

I am looking for the correct/common way to call the single spaces which are generally clearly visibile in parking lots as you can see from the picture: I would probably call them "parking slots,...
2
votes
1answer
94 views

Operator: “Are you through, Sir?” - AmEng vs. BrEng

In the context of a telephone call via an operator-assisted service, is it fact that in AmEng, if the operator asks the service user (caller) if they are through, what is meant by that is, are you ...
7
votes
2answers
155 views

AmEng equivalent for BrEng “decorator”

Oxford Dictionaries Online defines [interior] decorator as follows: 1.1 chiefly North American A person whose job is to design the interior of someone’s home, by choosing colors, carpets, ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Position of question mark after a quotation (that is not itself a question) and a citation [duplicate]

In British English, where should one place the question mark in the following sentence? Was it true that "the food was all gone" (Bloggs, 2013, p. 287) Inside the quotation marks, after them, or ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

Bust confusions? [closed]

I'm wondering if we can say 'bust confusions', as in the title 'Common Grammar Confusions Busted!' Thank you! Yatt
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Is there a verb similar to ‘to greet’ used when people depart?

I am looking for words analogous to ‘to greet’ and ‘greeter’, to use about people as they depart. I may say: Claire stands at the entrance and greets people as they arrive. She is a greeter. I want ...
0
votes
2answers
100 views

What is the equivalent to “wise guy” in British English? [closed]

How would I say "wise guy" (as in gangster/mafia speak) if I was in London, England? Wise guy is a very american phrase, so what would be the Equivalent in Britain london??
2
votes
1answer
69 views

Is it formal or informal to use y/o as an abbreviation of “years old”? [closed]

This is my first question on this site. I am not a native speaker. My question is, is it formal or informal to use y/o as an abbreviation of "years old" in British English?