This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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0answers
101 views

Why does written English have more variations in pronunciation than other languages? [closed]

According to my experience, in languages like German, French, Chinese, Japanese, etc., there are not so many exceptions in pronunciation as in English. For example, given a word in German or French, ...
-2
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2answers
116 views

No one knows or no one know? [closed]

Can you tell which of the following sentences are right? And explain why the others are wrong? No one knows the answer. No one know the answer. There is nobody anwering the qustion. There is nobody ...
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3answers
62 views

Is there a difference in pronunciation between grandma and grammar? [closed]

? Also is there a difference between morning and moaning? Assuming British as spoken in London ("Jafaican") but also interested in other dialects
3
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1answer
74 views

To light a cigarette

I've heard "to light a cigarette" being used a couple of times, but I am still in doubt about two things: Is this common both in American English and British English? Are there other ways to say it ...
1
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1answer
89 views

The usage of “Despite the fact that” [closed]

Can I add "such as " in front of the clause like this: Despite the fact that cognition may affect many different facets of ecology in wild animals, such as, dominance, sexual selection and ...
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2answers
85 views

Heel of Italy in Wikipedia? [closed]

Who can describe it for me? what does mean Heel and relation to italy? the region situated on the "heel" of Italy.
0
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3answers
80 views

Is there an English word that means “to feel the call of the homeland”?

I seem to remember reading it once, sort of meaning the opposite of diaspora - once you have spread far, you would feel the X, the call to return to the homeland?
0
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1answer
57 views

In British English, do you say “in high tide” or “at high tide”?

In American English you would say, for example, "At high tide the water level would be here." Is it different in British English? I'm reading a document that says, "In high tide the water level would ...
0
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1answer
273 views

Why in British English is it “map room” (singular “map”) but “games room” (plural “games”)?

Why is it normal in British English to say map room (for a room for keeping and viewing maps in) but games room (for a room for playing games in)? To my native British ear these forms sound ...
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0answers
27 views

Where in the world is the term 'flatmate' used?

Here in New Zealand the term 'flatmate' is the most commonly used term to refer to the people who share a rented living arrangement, much the same way that Americans would use 'roommate'. According ...
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1answer
107 views

“They saw the bus to come to the station.” What is wrong with this sentence? [closed]

Please, correct (if it needs) this sentence: They saw the bus to come to the station. Should I use to here?
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3answers
62 views

Operating System Concept, A Translation is need? [closed]

Who can translate the following sentence in a simple manner? Between garbage collections free space will build up, which cannot be reclaimed until the next time the garbage collector runs. This ...
0
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1answer
47 views

Is it grammatically correct help me ,with proper explanation,with tense explanation [closed]

You were got bored, weren't you? It that correct ,can we use all verbs in past tense.
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1answer
76 views

Is “maiden speech” regarded as politically incorrect?

Some people use "inaugural speech" instead of maiden speech. For example, from the Twitter account of the Australian Sex Party: From one year ago, the Inaugural Speech of @FionaPattenMLC ...
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0answers
73 views

How do the British pronounce these names? [closed]

Leif, as in Leif Ericsson; Elise, I know the British pronounce Denise like "dih-'neez"; Gisele; and Gisela
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2answers
37 views

"Proper Cheerio”: Proper?

A call to BrE speakers: A television outlet in NE US is advertising a gala fundraising event coinciding with the finale of the Downton Abbey television series in the States. Sunday, March 6, 2016 ...
10
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2answers
1k views

What does “a bit of a tartar” mean?

Recently, a woman I know who lives in England (OK, she's my fiancee, if you want to know), wrote to me and described someone she knows as "a bit of a tartar". Now in context it seemed like a friendly ...
0
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2answers
111 views

One Word : What do you call who chill / relax a lot? [closed]

I need one word for people who chill / party / relax / play games / travel and just chill most of the time. Some Word like 'Freizeit' , but it needs to be used as a noun for persons (eg, traveller, a ...
12
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2answers
1k views

Is “chaperon” versus “chaperone” a US versus British English thing?

I've noticed that "chaperone" can also be spelt "chaperon", without the "e" at the end. Is this a case of American English simplifying a British English word, or something else? The original French ...
0
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0answers
112 views

I wouldn't vs I'd not

I'm defending my word choice to an editor in a novel I've written. There are two points of view: one is a native Irish speaker, and the other, an American born and raised here. They're both eighteen. ...
3
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2answers
145 views

must vs have to: British usage and academic rules

I am teaching 'have to' vs 'must' (British English usage) and, according to the book, the difference is as follows: must: it's necessary to do it (because the speaker says so) have to: it's ...
0
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0answers
35 views

Why do some people drop “the” when saying “At The Hospital”? [duplicate]

Frequently I hear friends saying "He was in Hospital". Here in Texas, and elsewhere in the US, we typically say "He was in the hospital". Any reason for the discrepancy?
0
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3answers
83 views

'Go to sleep' vs 'Go and sleep'?

I just had a linguistics test (it's called UKLO) that measures you're ability to problem solve and translate languages you know nothing about. For one of my translation answers I wrote 'Don't go and ...
5
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3answers
286 views

Dinner at mine or yours?

I have noticed in British TV shows the common usage of 'mine' or 'yours' being used to mean 'my place' and 'your place' respectively. I spent a year in Britain in the early 1980s and I don't recall ...
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1answer
86 views

Why 'Germanic Languages' and 'Germanic Tribes'?

I've never been a fan of the word 'Germanic' and it's use to cover all Northern European (except the so-called 'Celtic Fringe') Tribes due to it's overtly political connotations. Can anyone tell me ...
0
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1answer
55 views

Present Perfect Simple vs Past Simple [closed]

How much has it cost? My father has paid for it. That's why I don't know its price. vs How much did it cost? My father paid for it. That's why I don't know its price. Which one is more ...
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2answers
69 views

What do we mean by the phrase 'conventions of standard written English' [closed]

A question came and it had one of its options: correct according to conventions of standard English. I don't remember the question but the question was from a grammar section. I do not have an idea ...
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1answer
34 views

Would it be more correct to say “active winter holidays” or “winter activity holidays”? [closed]

I have seen both phrases used by tourism websites. Are both correct?
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3answers
119 views

What is the etymology of the term “form factor”?

I'm a theoretical physicist, and am doing some work on quantities called form factors. To an expert, a form factor says something about scattering particles from fields. This probably originated from ...
3
votes
1answer
65 views

What does it mean to “take the mickey out of” something?

I am a Yank. I have a friend who lives in the UK, in Sussex. She writes: Mike and Rose are pretty good, but they tend to take the mickey out of my inadequacies. Mike and Rose are her ...
0
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3answers
131 views

What are other words for a collection of beautiful things?

I am looking for a word or term for a collection of beautiful things. Of either intrinsic value or even along the lines of 'a whole that is made of a sum of valuable parts'. Not necessarily in any ...
1
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1answer
86 views

What are the levels of proficiency in english and the vocubulary subsets at each level [closed]

What are the levels of proficiency in english and the vocubulary subsets at each level. As in how many words should a person know at each level of english proficiency and is there a reference list of ...
9
votes
4answers
352 views

“[a/the] equivalent of” vs. “[a/the] equivalent for” vs. “[a/the] equivalent to”

Which of the following constructs sound more idiomatic to you? Is there any British/American equivalent to the French phrase "broyer du noir"? Is there any British/American equivalent for the ...
2
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1answer
62 views

Whence the BrE “fine tooth-comb” where AmE uses “fine-tooth comb”?

I'm reading a novel set in present-day England, and it's sprinkled with uses of the construction in the title. This is far from the first time I've encountered this in BrE writing, along with general ...
0
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2answers
70 views

What “appear to be ” means in the given sentence [closed]

Today, while reading a newspaper I came across a sentence that has been baffling me since: The woman, who identified herself as Bhavna and appeared to be in her 20s, .... What does appeared to ...
31
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8answers
10k views

When talking to American clients, should I say “smoothie” or “milkshake”?

We have a client visit planned to our service center (in India) and I am in-charge of Food and Beverages for our client's entire itinerary. I am writing to my client's Travel coordinator(an American) ...
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2answers
70 views

How do you pronounce Calvin in British English

How do the British pronounce the 'a' between c and l? Is it like 'callous' or 'call'?
5
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2answers
128 views

“Milk in first and Indian”—what does it mean?

Reading A Murder of Quality by John le Carré, I came across the following remark by Mrs. Hecht, a detestable upper-class Englishwoman (emphasis mine): "Though, of course, the Midlands are ...
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1answer
145 views

Word usage: “manyfold” or “manifold”? [closed]

Is there any US/UK English difference in the spellings "manyfold" and "manifold"?
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3answers
52 views

Are there local differences in the definitions of cleaning and tidying?

Do the words cleaning and tidying translate differently in different English speaking countries? Specifically, would vacuuming always be considered part of tidying AND cleaning?
5
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1answer
81 views

Is “oxbow lake” used by both American and British English for billabongs?

Is the term "oxbow lake" used in both American and British English to describe billabongs? Wiktionary has a definition for oxbow lake, but doesn't describe which varieties of English use it.
2
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1answer
199 views

What does “easy-going” mean?

I am a non-native English learner. And when I was looking up the word easy-going in dictionaries, the explanations really confused me. Is the word easy-going positive or negative? Some dictionaries ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

Is the sentence grammer correct? “During the meeting that … , I had …”? [closed]

"During the meeting that Dr. Edward Smith coordinated last month, I had the chance to meet with you and hear the possible projects ..." English is my second language, and I usually feel that my ...
2
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1answer
66 views

“wallet” vs. “[change] purse” in NAmEng and BrEng vernaculars

Is a man's change purse sometimes called wallet by their owner? If so, what would they usually call their actual wallet to distinguish it from their change purse? purse: a small bag, pouch, ...
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3answers
483 views

“cologne” and “aftershave” for “fragrance for men”

Per Farlex Trivia Dictionary, perfume or parfum is 20–40% oil and the highest concentration; eau de toilette is 10–18% oil, and cologne or eau de cologne is 3–9% oil. Leaving aside the technical ...
5
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2answers
323 views

“Jolly good” meaning “extremely good” in British English

Like the intensifier bloody, I assumed that jolly as an adverb and intensifier is not broadly used in the U.S. meaning very or extremely. According to Oxford Online Dictionary, jolly as an adverb ...
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2answers
88 views

Pronouncing dates in British English

The normal way to pronounce a date such as "22 August" or "22/8" in British English is "the twenty-second of August." My question is, do the pronunciations "twenty-two August" and "twenty-two eight" ...
1
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1answer
57 views

Military and Peerage Titles

If you are referring to a member of the peerage, I know you would capitalize Lord Matlock or the Earl of Matlock. If I am calling him the Earl and it is directly in reference to him, without the ...
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1answer
38 views

One translating Problem? [closed]

What Does the following sentence mean? the BIU Fetches a new instruction whenever the queue has room for 2 bytes in the 6-byte 8086 queue, and for 1 byte in 4-byte 8088 queue I thinks it means ...
3
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2answers
159 views

Specific terms for the tray and the bus-like cart used by vendors in theaters, stadiums, trains, etc

Is there a specific word in English for the bus-like (sense 2; sense 3 on AHD) cart and the tray used by vendors to carry their products through the aisles of trains, theaters, stadiums, etc.?