This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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-1
votes
1answer
141 views

Got started or started

I am a learner of the English language. I have written two sentences, please give your two minutes and let me know, which one is correct? In the below sentences an action was started by my dog, for an ...
-1
votes
3answers
109 views

Which department work is being carried out for

I am a non-English-speaking software developer who faces difficulties with the English language. I built a form for users submitting work for my department. The users should write down their name and ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

Is this a polite way to ask questions? [closed]

I want to send questions to someone, I want to ask you if this way is polite and if there are better ways: I want to ask you questions, your answers would be appreciated I want to ask you ...
-2
votes
3answers
825 views

Which one is more British: “car hire” or “rent a car”?

I am wondering which one is more commonly used in the United Kingdom: car hire or rent a car?
-2
votes
2answers
484 views

Pronunciation of “xenophobia,” “xenon,” and “Xena” [closed]

I've heard all of the above words with X as zeh. Is that an American English thing? What's the correct way to pronounce each word?
-2
votes
2answers
554 views

Parenthesis and quotations having punctuation before AND after them [closed]

I'll have to come up with some examples to show you my question: I know if a sentence is inside either, the punctuation is inside (I also know I use a lot of comma splices. I think of the way the ...
-2
votes
3answers
638 views

What is the difference between rotate and revolve? [closed]

What is the difference between rotation and revolution? I don't find any difference between the two words from the meanings I read about them. Both words have the same meaning: moving in a circle ...
-2
votes
1answer
252 views

Pronunciation of 'Superman'

How do you pronounce the word, Superman? For example the pronunciation of man seems equal in American and British English. But this is not the case for Superman. It seems that in American English, it ...
-2
votes
1answer
189 views

“Cant fight no more”, is this grammatically correct? [duplicate]

"Cant fight no more", is this grammatically correct? If not, what is the correct way of saying this?
-2
votes
2answers
316 views

of areas involved with patients’ care - or patients care? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: User’s/Users’/Users Group What would be the correct way with UK English spelling: patients' care or patients care? I have terrible search skills, I could not find an ...
-2
votes
2answers
3k views

What is the correct British / Irish English spelling of Yoghurt? [closed]

Is it youghurt, yoghurt, or yogurt? Is there a correct spelling, or are they all correct?
-2
votes
0answers
44 views

where is pardeep? what are different ways to answer this question? [on hold]

What are the different ways to answer this kind of question in English?
-2
votes
0answers
16 views

What is the meaning of “But For” in this senence?Can someone explain it please? [duplicate]

The term “significant break” is defined at para 29 as a period of at least 31 days during which “not one of those days is a day on which [the person] does more than three hours work overseas, or a day ...
-2
votes
1answer
3k views

English phrases/expressions and their meanings [closed]

In English we have expressions/phrases that come from the combination of two or more words, conjunctions, etc. These expressions have their own metaphorical meanings, which could be used in specific ...
-3
votes
2answers
646 views

Are there are more vowels in the American English than in British? [closed]

car, father, jarring ■ man, lad, mast A British guy would pronounce the vowel "a" equally in all these words. But an American would give one sound for the first three words, and the other ...
-3
votes
1answer
202 views

Origin of “happen” [closed]

What is the origin of the word happen? If it comes from the word hap, what is the early usage of that word?
-4
votes
2answers
847 views

Is this correct sentence?

I wrote: it would never have been possible if i didn't have interest in the least bit but a friend of mine told it is wrong and should be: it would never have been possible if i had not ...
-4
votes
1answer
3k views

which is correct? you no need to worry or you need not to worry [closed]

Can someone plz tell me which is the right one and naturally a better one? You no need to worry about it You need not to worry about it Thanks
-5
votes
1answer
60 views

how has language changed from the Tudor era until now? [closed]

i want to know what the dramatic changes between now and then. And what language techniques have disappeared or are still in use today. And just anything that proves that language has changed (: ...
-5
votes
1answer
2k views

How do you pronounce 'ate' in American and British English? [closed]

How do you pronounce 'ate' in American and British English? I cannot find it...
-10
votes
3answers
903 views

Is “Honouree” correct in British English? [closed]

I seem to only find Honoree in the web, but Word spell corrector indicates me that I should write HonoUree. Which form is correct?