This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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64 views

If subscription is a contract to receive something, what is a contract to send something called?

I'm using the word subscription with the following meaning: subscription: an arrangement to receive something, typically a publication, regularly by paying in advance. (Definition taken from ...
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1answer
50 views

“The idea of the X came from Y” vs “The idea of the X raised from Y”

I'm confiused a little bit in a correct usage of the word idea in sentences. Wich one of the following correct? The idea of the system design came from the knowledge acquired in literature review ...
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1answer
51 views

Is there a single word for people/ consultants who partner with our health? [closed]

We made a card for hospitals which introduces the doctors to its patients. We named the card Meet Your Healers, but we need a new word to replace Healers now.
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1answer
203 views

Pluralisation of sports teams in British and American English [duplicate]

Why do British and American English differ in this respect: British Southampton are eyeing up a ready-made replacement for Luke Shaw American Southampton is eyeing up a ready-made ...
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2answers
231 views

using has to or have to [closed]

I have example of two sentences here He has to write a report.' with he, she,it we will be using has. but why we are using have here instead of has with "She" She doesn't have to wear a uniform ...
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1answer
136 views

Is “I have Asperger syndrome” grammatically correct? [closed]

I'm trying to write my first book. In it, the protagonist has Asperger syndrome. It was going well until I encountered this sentence (the boy is confessing to another person) and became confused. Is ...
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4answers
474 views

Is the verb “are” missing in this sentence?

I have a question about a possible grammatical error in this sentence: "We hope you find our toilets in good condition". I came across it lately on one of the mall's notice boards. In my opinion this ...
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1answer
1k views

Is it offensive to refer to someone as a bird? [closed]

Is it offensive to refer to someone as a bird? Is it similar to calling someone a chick in the US? What's the difference?
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1answer
333 views

How to say 100,500 [duplicate]

How do you say the number 100,500? Is it one hundred thousand five hundred? For some reason that doesn't sound write in my mind. The number 10,500 is ten thousand five hundred. Please correct me ...
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1answer
155 views

Is 'read' still synonymous with 'majored' in BrE? [closed]

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_American_and_British_English#university "She read biology at Cambridge." That doesn't mean 'she read a book or something about biology at Cambridge'?
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1answer
103 views

Is on/before 15 July better than by 15 July if I want to be precise and unambiguous? Which is the more common form?

When the last day of registration is, let's say, 15 July, we currently say "please confirm your registration before 16 July" but students often send their confirmation on 16 July, rather than 15. I ...
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3answers
1k views

Use “underway” or “under way” as an adverb?

Is it proper to use underway as an adverb? Or should under way be used? Merriam-Webster defines underway as an adjective and under way as an adverb. The Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & ...
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1answer
59 views

what does this mean “ I got 70 + application forms” [duplicate]

Today I saw, someone has written I got 70+ application forms What is the purpose of the plus sign in that statement?
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1answer
53 views

Which organizations responsible for formalizing English Language (British and American) [duplicate]

I need this information to make my own English language site, but I do not want to use copy-paste from other sites or books. I need to find the source of information to make a correct content. If ...
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1answer
43 views

I thorougly enjoy _____ [closed]

Does thoroughly fit well in this sentence? Is it appropriate to use it in a formal sentence?
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1answer
91 views

1920's terms for parents/children

What would young children (aged around 5-ish) have called their parents circa 1920's England? Were there specific terms of endearment, or would it just be "mother" and "father"? I'm particularly ...
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1answer
118 views

Will that be fine?

Quite a few times now, a waiter or shop assistant has asked me: Will that be fine? I've noticed that I've only ever heard Indian English speakers use this turn of phrase. To my (British) ear, ...
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1answer
57 views

Is there a more proper way to denote the question-and-answer literature, as title of academic work? [closed]

In a context of an academic publication addressing readers favoring British English, what would be the better way to denote the "Questions and Answers" genre? I am looking for a more specialised way ...
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2answers
63 views

To sightsee …or ..to go sightseeing?

How common is it, nowadays, to say that one 'sightsees', rather than 'goes sightseeing'?
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2answers
67 views

Is checklist or tick box (or something else) more common in British English?

When referring to a list of items that you check off as you complete, would the British say, "checklist," "tick box," or something else?
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3answers
163 views

Etymology of “shagged [out]” (BrE exhausted, knackered)

I was intrigued by this comment to an earlier ELU post... [shagged out] Meaning 'very tired', presumably originating from having lots of sex but used generally to mean tired for whatever reason ...
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1answer
142 views

Asking a “Do you have…” question without do-support

Is the following sentence correct English? Have you the address? The address in question is obvious to the person being asked. It's normal to ask such a question as "Do you have the address?" ...
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2answers
50 views

is 'do we actually know where we are going any more' a question?

I'm confused as to if do we actually know where we are going any more is a question or not, because of the 'do' I think yes but when read it seems like a sentence.
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1answer
79 views

Pronunciation problem [closed]

I am from India. I am very eager to learn English. So I am used to add some English words with my language. But My friends says that you are having problem with your pronunciation. I tried a lot of ...
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1answer
117 views

Can we use both British English and American English in the same article?

Can we use British English trends and American English trends (such as spelling, or turns of phrase) in different sentences in the one topic?
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2answers
94 views

Is the use of a period within quotes, in a sentence, accepted?

In the article by Anthoney McCartney on Yahoo! News (http://news.yahoo.com/man-arrested-red-carpet-says-never-hit-pitt-172635914.html): Don't get offended at me. Don't get mad at me. And just to ...
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1answer
148 views

Simple past or present perfect when describing a series of recent actions

I, as an American, would opt for the simple past rather than the present perfect in the following sentence: Today she has gone to a class, and after that she has been shopping. Is this sentence ...
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1answer
19k views

What informal and formal letter/e-mail closings are used the most? [duplicate]

I often struggle with doubts about the correctness of the closings which I use. I'm not a native speaker and I'm worried that I'll make a mistake in the last part of the letter/e-mail. Some examples: ...
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1answer
132 views

Pronunciations for “Either” [duplicate]

In general, EFL students are taught the two main ways of pronouncing the determiner "either" are the British [ˈaɪðə] and the American [ˈiːðər] varieties. However, I've repeatedly heard from specific ...
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1answer
40 views

Usage of the word halt

I was looking for the meaning of Draw up and this was the definition:" to cause to a halt". The thing is it confused me more because I have no idea what halt means and in what sentences could I use ...
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4answers
5k views

Is there a formal way to say we want to go to the toilet? [closed]

I've heard: "I've to go the potty", "I have to meet Mr John", "Nature is calling me, I have to go", "I've to go to the rest room". These sentences aren't formal, are they? Is there any other way ...
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1answer
106 views

Why is the beginning of a quote in old text sometimes denoted by a capital letter but no quotation marks?

In the following text of Pamela by Samuel Richardson, well is capitalised — possibly to denote speech, where inverted commas have been neglected. As GEdgar points out, this is not an isolated ...
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1answer
48 views

Is it right to say that “they have their utopia starting when they see a plate of food and water” [closed]

I have to do a presentation about a third world country next week and I started writing down what I am going to say and I am stuck in the introduction! I am speaking Greek and this phrase make sense ...
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2answers
3k views

A/an hypothesis? [duplicate]

Is it a or an hypothesis? I am not a native speaker (and not very language talented) so I would appreciate any explanation/rules.
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2answers
899 views

Which are the most common Latin words/phrases used in spoken English? [closed]

Please, specify American/British Engilsh! I think these below are very common but I have no idea if they are commonly used in spoken English. ad hoc per se a priori de facto ergo et cetera vice ...
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1answer
103 views

Can a dash be used in this instance?

I would like to confirm the use of a dash in this sentence: My name is Mat, I am a Bristol based designer in the UK - I forge digital art, illustrations & websites Is this the proper use ...
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2answers
2k views

Negation in English

In English there are at least two ways to express negation, for example: — I don't have money — I have no money or — No objects were found — Objects were not found or — No restrictions are applied — ...
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3answers
86 views

Is this correct for an email campaign subject? [duplicate]

Just wondering whether the following sentence is grammatically correct — I was always taught that you shouldn't have two ands within the same sentence. We are not able to come up with a better ...
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1answer
88 views

Who would say “letters of love” as opposed to “love letters”?

From what part of the world would a person refer to love letters as letters of love?
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3answers
182 views

Although correct, is “the above” to be avoided?

Although the phrase the above is not exactly incorrect, should it be avoided? For example, imagine a letter with a heading "Re: Order for 79 purple cardboard slugs". Should a paragraph in the letter ...
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1answer
6k views

“If I was to” vs. “If I were to” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “If I was” or “If I were”. Which is more common, and which is correct? If I was to sum up my computer knowledge in one word, it would be “destitute”. If I were ...
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1answer
1k views

What's the difference between “bloke”, “chap” and “lad”?

Several synonyms are used in the UK: bloke, chap, lad. What's the difference between them?
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1answer
124 views

“Is it” South Africa only

I don't know if it is still in vogue but ten years ago in South Africa the phrase "Is it?" was common. It could be used as a response to almost any statement. Is it (ha ha) unique to South Africa or ...
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1answer
2k views

“If something were” or “If something was” in the 2nd conditional? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “what if there was” or “what if there were”? Correct usage of was/were on the object of a sentence “Was” or ...
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2answers
702 views

Are there clear differences in formality of words between British-English and American-English [closed]

I wonder if there are any clear distinctions regarding using formal words in British-English and in American-English. Do American and English people use different words when for instance asking a ...
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1answer
58 views

How to pronounce Alois in A Dog of Flanders? [closed]

The e-book I have downloaded from Amazon has Alois, but Wikipedia seems to have Aloise. I do not know which one is correct in the first place. I shall assume Alois is the correct one. A Dog of ...
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1answer
45 views

Another way of saying “accompanied by family members”?

I'm writing a sign-up form for an event. The form has a checkbox, where people can indicate if they are bringing family members. Currently I have the field labeled: Accompanied by family members ...
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2answers
35 views

A term for Not Applicable in the context of UI/UX [closed]

I want to give an option to a user to check if an option is not applicable for her. However the two words in "Not Applicable" are too huge for my GUI. Suggestions Would be greatly appreciated :)
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0answers
18 views

rent a car, rent out a car, hire a car [migrated]

English not my native language. I'm trying to understand what would be correct in British English. If I want to use a car for some time. I can say, "I want to rent a car". But from my knowledge there ...
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0answers
19 views

How should I capitalize “Keep On Running/Keep On Moving” and “Walk On Down”? [duplicate]

These are the song titles by Spencer Davis Group/Deep Purple and Aerosmith accordingly, I know that if a preposition is a part of a phrasal verb it is capitalized, but everywhere I look, I see "Keep ...