This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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0
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3answers
82 views

Is this correct for an email campaign subject? [duplicate]

Just wondering whether the following sentence is grammatically correct — I was always taught that you shouldn't have two ands within the same sentence. We are not able to come up with a better ...
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votes
1answer
87 views

Who would say “letters of love” as opposed to “love letters”?

From what part of the world would a person refer to love letters as letters of love?
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3answers
161 views

Although correct, is “the above” to be avoided?

Although the phrase the above is not exactly incorrect, should it be avoided? For example, imagine a letter with a heading "Re: Order for 79 purple cardboard slugs". Should a paragraph in the letter ...
0
votes
1answer
5k views

“If I was to” vs. “If I were to” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “If I was” or “If I were”. Which is more common, and which is correct? If I was to sum up my computer knowledge in one word, it would be “destitute”. If I were ...
0
votes
1answer
969 views

What's the difference between “bloke”, “chap” and “lad”?

Several synonyms are used in the UK: bloke, chap, lad. What's the difference between them?
0
votes
1answer
120 views

“Is it” South Africa only

I don't know if it is still in vogue but ten years ago in South Africa the phrase "Is it?" was common. It could be used as a response to almost any statement. Is it (ha ha) unique to South Africa or ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“If something were” or “If something was” in the 2nd conditional? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “what if there was” or “what if there were”? Correct usage of was/were on the object of a sentence “Was” or ...
0
votes
2answers
647 views

Are there clear differences in formality of words between British-English and American-English [closed]

I wonder if there are any clear distinctions regarding using formal words in British-English and in American-English. Do American and English people use different words when for instance asking a ...
0
votes
0answers
61 views

Board-bored split and pour-poor merger [on hold]

According to some sources (e.g. Mott (2012:76), Wells (1982:310)) the so-called board-bored split is a feature of London accents (e.g. Cockney, Estuary English). Thus, /ɔː/ is realized as a centring ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Interested in him learning French - with accusative 'him' [duplicate]

Good morning everyone! Is it correct to say " I' m interested in him learning French in the future"?
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0answers
12 views

Purpose of Subjunctive Past [duplicate]

What is exactly a subjunctive past? When do we use it? Could anyone please give some examples of the occasions we use the Subjunctive Past?
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0answers
40 views

Using hyphens in numbers (British English)

I heard that there is some recent rule which says that you shouldn't hyphenate numbers such as "twenty-two". Is this true?
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0answers
25 views

Referral Campaigns or Your Referral Schemes

I have a referral program which comprises of 50% UK users and 50% US users. Taking into account location, what would be the most appropriate title to use... Your Referral Campaigns Or Your ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

differences between 'ourselves' and 'one another'

Please, what is the usage of these two? When should we use ourselves and when not to use it? Thanks. "Eg, ... That we should benefit from ourselves." Is this correct??
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votes
0answers
24 views

Asking about date [duplicate]

I'd like to know which way of asking questions is more common in the UK. Is there any difference? 1 What is the date today or What date is today? 2 What is the day today or What day is today? ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

When to use Might & May? [duplicate]

Is it correct to say "MIGHT I have a look around? OR "MAY" I have a look around? Which is correct and why ? Thanks
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votes
0answers
22 views

Separate vs. joined words (hyphen or not) [duplicate]

English is not my native language, and sometimes it's confusing.. Especially uk-english vs. american and hyphens Can someone explain a bit when to use which of these? It's for a global english ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

Co owns with me in official letter to Home Office

I have couple of sentences as, I confirm that my brother, Name, DOB 01/01/0001, Nationality Indian co owns property 00 Same Road, Manchester, UK with me and I have no obligations for his wife to ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Plural/singular form for a company in American English? [duplicate]

Somewhere on the internet a guy claims that in American English it's proper to use the singular form for conjugating the predicate of group terms such as company, band, team etc. In British English, ...
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votes
2answers
3k views

What would be your reply if someone asks you, “How do you do?” [duplicate]

What would be your reply, if someone asks you How do you do?
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votes
3answers
143 views

Difference in meaning between “booking is amended” and “booking has been amended” [duplicate]

What is the difference in meaning between "booking is amended" and "booking has been amended"?
0
votes
1answer
59 views

What's the better way to reply to the email [closed]

Is this the official email to log on to the website.? how should I reply to this what text can I add to YES which would be appropriate Thanks
0
votes
1answer
130 views

What tense should I use here? Present perfect/past simple

It's been two years since the accident and she (forgot or has forgotten?) her lesson.
0
votes
1answer
84 views

Acceptance- vs staging environment

In application development it is common practice to push newly developed versions of code to an environment other then the life environment to have other people test it. In my previous company we ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

Punctuation in my sentences [duplicate]

I am a learner of the English language and especially I am learning the punctuation marks in the English language. I have written two sentences. Please give your two minutes and let me know, which ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

Origin of 'Son of a Gun' [duplicate]

According to the OED a 'son of a gun' was a child born to a woman who accompanied her husband on a Royal Navy gunship. However I distinctly remember hearing on a BBC Radio 4 history programme that the ...
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votes
0answers
32 views

English phonetics References [duplicate]

What are some great references on English pronunciation practices? The book The Big Book of Beastly Mispronunciations was mentioned in an answer on this site. Is it considered authoritative? What ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Software to change American punctuation to British [migrated]

My apologies if this is off topic. American and British writing have different punctuation styles. Is there any software that can change American style punctuation to British? I am referring to ...
0
votes
1answer
10k views

How many types of English are there? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What's the difference between the various dialects of English? I know of American English and British English, but how many other types of English are there?
0
votes
0answers
57 views

their or his/her [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it correct to use “their” instead of “his or her”? Often I seen some write wrote "their" and some using "his/her". Which is correct? Everyone ...
0
votes
0answers
361 views

How Would One Use A Semicolon (;)? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does one correctly use a semicolon? I'm wondering about the difference between just ending the sentence and starting a new one based on the same subject and using a ...
0
votes
2answers
33 views

How to phrase “analysis into a company”

I want to say : Analysis conducted at a insurance company showed that... or Analysis into a insurance company showed that... What is the best way to phrase this?
0
votes
2answers
111 views

“Named for” vs. “named after”

As a Brit, I'm used to the phrase named after being used to say how something got its name. For example, in Wikipedia's List of eponymous roads in London, we read that Addison Road is named after the ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

Question related to cover letter [closed]

I have a few queries regarding how to write a cover letter: "make a real contribution as member of your team." or "make a real contribution as A member of your team." "If I may be a further ...
0
votes
3answers
437 views

Use of as good and as well

Are these two sentences correct? This is as good as ... This works as well as ... Edit: This one is as good as the other one. This one works as well as the other one.
-1
votes
2answers
18k views

What does 'reference' mean in a CV?

I am an undergraduate student who is creating a CV for internship. I saw a CV template which had a heading called "Reference." What does that mean? Is it related to the applicant's previous work ...
-1
votes
1answer
226 views

(UK-US English) If “mom = mother” then why “mum” isn't “muther”? [closed]

So, I've noticed something weird. People who speak US English say Mom. Mom represents the word "mother". People who speak UK English say Mum. Mum also represents the word "mother". Why isn't it ...
-1
votes
1answer
234 views

Interpretation of 'have' as stative or dynamic

Please bear with me. It's been a long time since I looked up grammatical concepts. The sentence is: I can quite clearly see the bewildered looks you will be having on your faces on reading this. ...
-1
votes
1answer
3k views

“Three-hundred forty-two” or “three-hundred and forty-two”? [closed]

So on this answer here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12699791/finding-the-word-version-of-a-number/12700097#comment17146082_12700097 We were having the argument whether it is “three hundred and ...
-1
votes
1answer
241 views

Do these sentences have the same meaning?

Please tell me if the following sentences have the same meaning or if there is any difference between them. I can't do this task. I didn't finish this task.
-1
votes
3answers
190 views

“Testification” in US English

The usage of Dieter Wisclieceny’s statements and testifications from the Nuremberg Trials as the basis for the interrogation and trial of Eichmann is also accurate. In Microsoft word, the ...
-1
votes
1answer
150 views

(Presumably) an address without preposition

I'm trying to translate a contract between two parties, and I came across this: Package and delivery Dual Gadgets, Kempston, Beds UK as defined in TERMS 2001. and Delivery Point The ...
-1
votes
1answer
228 views

Correct headline in scientific pro/contra table

Which words are appropriate for the headline in a table with pros and cons in a scientific paper (physics)? PROS CONS ice cheap cold fish expensive warm
-1
votes
2answers
556 views

Is 'r' in Br/Amr pronunciation of Arjmand (Persian word) silent?

Is 'r' in Br/Amr pronunciation of 'Arjmand' (Persian word) silent? (In other words, how is this word pronounced in Br/Amr English?)
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

Definition for a sentence used in thesis/dissertation cover pages [closed]

I was looking at some cover pages and see that most of them use the following sentence; A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF.... What does it really ...
-1
votes
2answers
98 views

Is “subordinated” a good translation of the Italian legal term “subordinato”? [closed]

I've found this translation http://www.wordreference.com/iten/subordinato but I am not sure if English legals use subordinate to define a party that is subordinated to another. Any suggestion? EDIT: ...
-1
votes
1answer
58 views

How to write the date of an event that lasts a few days [American / British English]

I saw this topic: How to write the date of an event that lasts a few days But have some questions. Firstly, I would like to know how to say the same but in British English. I think that "The event ...
-1
votes
2answers
774 views

British and other English variants of 'write to me' - 'write me'' [duplicate]

In British English, the standard is 'write to me'. In American English the standard is 'write me'. Similar variants exist with 'out of the window' and 'out the window'. When did the dropping of ...
-1
votes
1answer
784 views

Is there a rule for how to pronounce words such as “dance”, “prance”, “castle”?

Is there a grammatical rule for the pronunciation of words such as dance, castle and prance? I believe the British English pronunciation is "ah", while in American English it is a short "a" sound.
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

What does 'tickety boo' mean? [duplicate]

We had an engineer at our house the other day to check an appliance and he used the term 'tickety boo' at least three times. Clearly being British I am aware of the expression, and I also think I know ...