1
vote
3answers
487 views

Use of “manifest” as an active verb

Recently I completed an English creative writing exam in which I used the phrase files and papers manifest, as if by some unholy magic at the tray on his desk. My teacher stated that my use of ...
1
vote
2answers
598 views

Banking meaning of “held”

While filling in a UK form I just encountered the following question: How many credit cards held? This was followed by a free-form text field. So they are either asking ‘how many credit cards ...
3
votes
1answer
201 views

“Tabled”, US vs UK [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the meaning of the expression “We can table this”? Here's an example snippet for some context. Ann had an idea. We tabled her idea. In the UK this means ...
-3
votes
1answer
206 views

Origin of “happen” [closed]

What is the origin of the word happen? If it comes from the word hap, what is the early usage of that word?
3
votes
3answers
322 views

He considers that X is Y. vs He thinks that X is Y

The following verb in sentence 1 strikes me as strange when it has the same meaning as in sentences 2 and 3 below. He considers that blue cheese is delicious. He thinks that blue cheese is ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

“Parametrise” or “parameterise” a curve?

In British English, which one is correct? Does one parameterise a curve or parametrise it?
7
votes
6answers
18k views

'Expired' or 'Passed away'?

When someone dies, do we say they expired or passed away? Does the word expired give any more respect when used? Or less respect than passed away?
1
vote
2answers
594 views

Difference between “engage” and “hire”

For example, "We decide to engage a lawyer for the case." "We decide to hire a lawyer for the case." Is engage used particularly in British English? Do speakers of American English use engage in ...
1
vote
2answers
291 views

What determines the meaning of ‘rise’ with no adverb or preposition?

From my earlier question, I got “rising” in the following citation means getting up from the bed. 1.(Harry was sitting up on a bed in the hospital wing at school, surrounded by his visitors. Fudge, ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

Which does ‘rising’ here mean, to stand up or to get angry?

Harry was sitting up on a bed in the hospital wing at school, surrounded by his visitors. Fudge, one of them, started to insult Harry. Did Mrs. Weasley want to prevent him from getting angry or from ...
10
votes
3answers
8k views

“Haven't you?” or “don't you?”

What is the right question tag (in British English) when we use the verb have? I have interviewed a few native speakers and none of them could explain why sometimes they prefer "haven't/hasn't" and ...
4
votes
2answers
10k views

“Interfere in” vs. “interfere with”

I was taught that when interfere is followed by in, it means to get involved in something that doesn't concern you; when followed by with, it means to prevent something from being done. And this is ...
3
votes
5answers
19k views

British English: “fantasise” or “fantasize”?

I would like to know which spelling is more common in the UK: fantasise or fantasize?
3
votes
3answers
18k views

Difference between “get” and “take”

What is the difference between "get" and "take"? Both are used to describe receiving something. By intuition I mostly guess which one to use, but would like to know some rule which will stick in my ...
5
votes
2answers
713 views

When can “have” be used without “got”?

I read this article and now I'm confused when got can be omitted when using have. Could this be explained in plain English without technical terms? Is there a different usage in past tense?