This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in the isles of Britain and sometimes Ireland.

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-2
votes
2answers
41 views

Your vs yours - is there a rule?

English is not my first language so maybe this is the reason for this question - is there a formal rule whether to say 'your' or 'yours': This is your hat. but The hat is yours (not 'your')
1
vote
1answer
37 views

What is the thought process to solving anagrams à la Countdown

I'm not sure if this best belongs on this Stack Exchange site, or some psychological one, but here goes. I'm wondering what the thought process behind solving anagrams is, as in, pulling words out of ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

usage of the verb to bridge in “Bridging someone to something”

My friend suggested a tag line for our project: "Bridging you to your dream higher education online" and I have doubts that "bridging you to smth." is a proper word usage. I've never heard this ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Do these phrases have any sense? [on hold]

To besmirch the honor of mr. Johnson. When we compare mr. Johnson with mr. Jackson, we disrespect the latter one (is it understandable that 'the latter one' refers to mr. Jackson?).
9
votes
9answers
1k views

A word for old-fashioned, dirty bar/place (spit-and-sawdust)

Is there a (common) single word for an old-fashioned, non-modern, simple, dirty, untidy bar/place ? A noun would be preferable. Details: There is an informal British term: spit-and-sawdust ...
-1
votes
2answers
52 views

us english vs uk english [on hold]

Why US and UK English is different. Though both are English, why there are different words in both countries like movie in UK and Cinema in US.
0
votes
2answers
34 views

using has to or have to [on hold]

I have example of two sentences here He has to write a report.' with he, she,it we will be using has. but why we are using have here instead of has with "She" She doesn't have to wear a uniform ...
2
votes
3answers
177 views

correct idiom for if you were me

I am looking for an idiom that can be used for this like "if you were me you would have done the same thing " OR something like empathy , think from my sight, is there any idiom for such scenerio? I ...
0
votes
2answers
64 views

Is the English-speaking Internet community moving towards Americanized spelling?

Some of my spelling checking software failed to recognize the American spelling of the words "organize" and "realize" when a British English dictionary is being used. Curious, I looked up the British ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

Best British English Grammar book? [closed]

The internet is full of resources and book reviews for American English. But I couldn't find even review or a suggested list of good reads for British English Grammar. Please suggest a good book with ...
2
votes
2answers
63 views

Usage of *what* for *that* or *than* in BrE

Occasionally, when watching British television or movies, I've come across a construct that isn't used in AmE. Using what as a replacement for that or than as a determiner or comparison. Here is an ...
1
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2answers
39 views

Single vs double quotation marks for nickname?

I am trying to conform to the British practice (specifically Oxford Style Guide) and I am a little confused which to use to mark a nickname: Andrew 'Andy' Johnson Andrew "Andy" Johnson I know ...
2
votes
2answers
61 views

British slang: larl

I've seen this word a couple of times in twitter and I've not gotten a clear definition. A friend of mine wrote a mock British text that went like this "al av ya mum ya larl cunt" so that might give ...
3
votes
2answers
51 views

Is the English language used by the European institutions the British one?

I find here an article on the use of English within EU institutions. It says: "our publications need to be comprehensible for their target audience, which is largely British and Irish, and should ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Simple past or present perfect when describing a series of recent actions

I, as an American, would opt for the simple past rather than the present perfect in the following sentence: Today she has gone to a class, and after that she has been shopping. Is this sentence ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

how should makeup be written?

By "makeup", I mean cosmetics, as in lipstick, foundation, eyeliner, etc. My assumption is that it should be written as "makeup", but others have suggested "make up" or "make-up". In case there are ...
2
votes
1answer
24 views

Is British English the one used in European academia?

English is used all over Europe in (more or less) academic papers and books that are not necessarily related to reviews and publishing houses based in UK or US, and that are not necessarily intended ...
3
votes
1answer
114 views

Why is the English devil “old”?

Looking up the etymology of the Devil's nickname, Old Nick, I came across this article in OUPblog written by Anatoly Liberman For some reason, devils, at least in English, are often called old: ...
1
vote
3answers
52 views

Born(e) (out?) of the desire

I'd be most grateful to anyone who could tell me which of the following is right xyz was born out of the desire to... xyz was born of the desire to... xyz was borne out of the desire to... xyz was ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

What tense should I use here? Present perfect/past simple

It's been two years since the accident and she (forgot or has forgotten?) her lesson.
1
vote
1answer
73 views

Can your use of Latin-derived words indicate your social class?

It is certainly true that educational level and social position usually walk together in most societies. Not considering that, however, and based only on how often one uses Graeco-Latin versus ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

Does the electricity “go or cut” “off or out”? [closed]

Which of the following choices are correct? While I was reading a book last night, suddenly the electricity ______. cut off cut out went off went out What are the differences ...
2
votes
4answers
94 views

What adverb, typical of AmE, coincides the most with the BrE sense to “quite” [=to a noticeable or partial extent]?

As long as -- seemingly -- the adverb "quite" in AmE idiomatically carries an emphatic sense to it -- pretty much similar to saying "completely" or "absolutely" as in "That girl looks quite pretty!" ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

“Go ahead” vs. “Carry on” in AE usage

Back when I was a student, I can recall my nonnative English teachers -- after discussing a certain word, or phrase, or passage from a text with the class -- saying for me or some other guy to please ...
6
votes
1answer
379 views

Processor vs Processer

Is there any difference between "processor" and "processer"? Some spelling dictionaries only have the -or form, and some have both. Is it a US vs UK English thing? Or something else? More ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

What is the difference between the word around and round

When I am writing I come across these two words a lot and I was wondering what is different about them and how they would be used in different contexts
-4
votes
1answer
42 views

how has language changed from the Tudor era until now? [closed]

i want to know what the dramatic changes between now and then. And what language techniques have disappeared or are still in use today. And just anything that proves that language has changed (: ...
4
votes
5answers
762 views

The name given to the trail of afterburn (of a jet perhaps?)

What is the name of the trail (of after burn) left by a jet? I know it's something nearly like "after burn", but I can't be sure as I've not used it for quite a long time!
2
votes
3answers
43 views

“on active service” vs “in active service”

In the Wikipedia article on the RAF "Grand Slam" bomb that was used by the RAF in World War II, it is recorded that the bomb was used 42 times: "By the end of the war, 42 Grand Slams had been ...
1
vote
2answers
102 views

Etymological analysis of swearwords [closed]

I'm writing a thesis about the etymological analysis of swearwords (profanity) in the English language; that is, I need to compare British and American English regarding the etymology of their ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

Why do English people pronounce 'sixth' as 'sicth'? [duplicate]

It's common practice in Ireland (and the US as far as I know) to pronounce the x in the middle of sixth: six-th [sɪksθ]. However, I've noticed from visits to England as well as watching British ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Acceptance- vs staging environment

In application development it is common practice to push newly developed versions of code to an environment other then the life environment to have other people test it. In my previous company we ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

“Mobile” vs. “cellphone” in AE

I already heard Americans use the term "mobile" for "cellphone" -- which I thought was chiefly BE -- and so I wish you could tell if such usage of "mobile" has any currency in GAE? Unless it might be ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

AE vs British English usage of hospital [duplicate]

We all know that Americans say: Sara is going to the hospital While in the UK, they would say (and Americans would never say): Sara is going to hospital I'm wondering what the history of this ...
2
votes
2answers
76 views

Does the English language have an official Academy?

For some languages, there are academies that decide topics such as grammar and spelling of things, for example, for the Spanish language, there are 22 academies in 22 different countries, all making ...
1
vote
1answer
104 views

Pronunciation of words such as “hot” and “stop” [closed]

I would like to ask how to pronounce the o sound in words like hot, stop in AE and BE. I noticed that BE's pronunciation is different from AE's for these words. According to Cambridge University ...
1
vote
2answers
58 views

Can you say “feral waters”? [closed]

I'm trying to think of a name for a game I'm creating. Since it's underwater I thought of "Feral Waters". Can you say that in English or is it rubbish?
1
vote
2answers
97 views

Talkies, Motion Pictures, Movies, Films and 3D Films

The term, talkies, i.e. talking pictures, I was surprised to learn was not coined in 1927, after the release of The Jazz Singer, but in 1913. The term is now obsolete whereas motion picture, meaning ...
1
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0answers
35 views

Spoken English. Need suggestions for improvements in spoken english [closed]

Please suggest a good website or book for improving my spoken english and public speaking skills.
2
votes
1answer
79 views

Signs, signs, everywhere there's signs

I am very much hoping that I have punctuated all of the following examples correctly per BrE punctuation. And I'm hoping that my bracketed explanations adequately and logically explain my reasoning to ...
29
votes
8answers
5k views

Why do Americans add “The” in front of a team name, but the British do not?

I'm not certain that there is an answer to this one: Americans refer to our teams as The Example: The New York Yankees The British in my experience do not. Example: Manchester United I ...
4
votes
1answer
168 views

Why don't Americans refer to Indians (and others from the subcontinent) as Asians?

I know there is a related question here, but I am not seeing an answer to "Why is there a difference?" Merely that an explanation of what is used in each country. I am a speaker of American English, ...
1
vote
4answers
70 views

Nouns as verbs, Brits and Yanks: ID cards

I find it interesting that not only do British and American English speakers both use the noun 'ID card' as a verb in the context of (trying to be in a position of) purchasing age-restricted items, ...
6
votes
2answers
218 views

Meaning and origin of British/Australian slang word 'tut'

About twenty years ago I overheard a girl from the north of England laughingly advise a friend to get ready for a night out by telling her to 'slap some tut on your face'. She clearly meant 'put on ...
4
votes
9answers
1k views

Is it really rude to use the terms “the john” and “the loo” in lieu of “the restroom”?

I usually use the term "restroom" (or "toilet" if I want to make sure that everyone in the Czech Republic understands me at once), and, while I've always understood that the terms "john" and "loo" are ...
2
votes
2answers
99 views

Does “moonlighting” have a negative or neutral connotation?

We all agree that "moonlighting" denotes having a second job. However, Merriam-Webster and Oxford Advanced Learner's don't define it in exactly the same way. For example, Merriam-Webster attaches a ...
1
vote
2answers
53 views

What does it mean? [closed]

"Thou hast been smitten?" https://www.google.nl/search?q=What+does+Thou+hast+been+smitten+mean%3F Doesn't deliver real results.
15
votes
7answers
3k views

Another meaning of the vulgar word “slut”

I guess people who speak American and Philippine English will unanimously agree that the word "slut" is a very offensive term referring to a promiscuous woman. However, Merriam-Webster and Oxford ...
0
votes
1answer
268 views

What informal and formal letter/e-mail closings are used the most? [duplicate]

I often struggle with doubts about the correctness of the closings which I use. I'm not a native speaker and I'm worried that I'll make a mistake in the last part of the letter/e-mail. Some examples: ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Pronunciations for “Either” [duplicate]

In general, EFL students are taught the two main ways of pronouncing the determiner "either" are the British [ˈaɪðə] and the American [ˈiːðər] varieties. However, I've repeatedly heard from specific ...