This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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0
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1answer
45 views

What does the word “penty” mean? [on hold]

And the word pent ? Are they very used in the british/american english ? Thank you for your help :)
-1
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0answers
19 views

grammatical name and grammatical function [on hold]

the genes of many of those infective agents.what is the grammatical name and grammatical function of the expression?my own answer:noun clause and function adjective noun infective agents.
1
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2answers
174 views

Centre of competence

I have seen this expression several times (Google search gives 67M answers), but it seems mostly used by French or Swiss institutions, while Wikipedia mentions centre of excellence or competency ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

“Wherever or Whenever”

Apologies for the title which sounds like the Shakira classic, but would you say "Thank you for providing help whenever possible" or "wherever possible"
-2
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0answers
29 views

What does “add to the store” mean? [on hold]

I found it on a review about Shelley's Frankenstein. It says: the novel only adds to the store, already too great, of painful sensations.
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0answers
24 views

The United States. Possesive is its or their?

The United States made no secret of its/their hope to absorb the provinces... http://grammarist.com/usage/united-states/ "Although United States is usually treated as a singular noun, it’s treated ...
1
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1answer
27 views

The use of “proceed” on the web

Recently I have been puzzled why the word proceed is found on most websites when the user is going to checkout, cart or shopping cart. Is there a reason for this in the english language that warrants ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

To encounter someone/something or to encounter with someone/something?

I have seen both forms and I don't know which one is the more appropriate (if there is a difference). The actual sentence in which I want to use it is "particles can encounter (with) the atoms of the ...
10
votes
5answers
3k views

When someone praises me awkwardly too much, how to reply? [on hold]

When someone praises me awkwardly, as in too much, to make me happy or to get some help or something else from me, how to say "don't do that". Like, "I'll do that for you, you don't need to --- me." ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

What's a “summer-funeral hit”?

In a YouTube comment commenting on Jamala's song 1944, someone says You guys enjoy your summer-funeral hit! I have nothing else to add. after saying Ukraine should't have won! What a ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Different-colored or different colored? UK vs US English

Can I write "differently colored" instead? What expression most British or Americans would rather use? "socks, different in color" "socks of different colors" "a different color of each sock"
3
votes
4answers
71 views

Word that describes many common household purchases

I m writing a research paper about the over consumption. I am struggling to find a word or words that describes the things we normally use in our daily lives like toothbrush, dish washer liquid, ...
5
votes
1answer
115 views

Which words or grammar forms are likely to cause a collision between American and British English?

For all the Mickey-taking on both sides of the water I suppose British and American speakers understand one another 99% of the time. Can anyone think of any areas of vocabulary or grammar where ...
0
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0answers
28 views

What grammar to use for a foreign Engineering student, both in Academia and Professionally? [closed]

As a European foreign speaker, speaking and writing English both as a student and in my profession; I would like to be more consistent in my grammar and would like to know what is more used in an ...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

“Five things to do for free” vs “Five free things to do” vs “Free five things to do” [closed]

I'm having a dilemma writing a slogan for my website. Website features articles of 5 free items to in specific locations. Which of the following taglines sounds most professional and British ...
-1
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0answers
21 views

When writing about an Indian office (“councillor”) in an American context (“councilor”), which spelling should I prefer?

I am writing about councilors in the Municipal Corporation of Delhi. The work will be published in an undetermined American academic journal. Should I use the spelling “councillors” (Indian English) ...
12
votes
4answers
363 views

Usage of “hysterical” meaning “very funny.”

One meaning (I am personally not very familiar with) of the adjective hysterical is: causing unrestrained laughter; very funny: Oh, that joke is hysterical! (Dictionary.com) No other ...
4
votes
1answer
200 views

Adele's pronunciation - Can't recognise some sounds in 'Rolling in the Deep'

I've listened to Rolling in the deep many times. But I still can't hear the words being pronounced, even when I know what they are. Think of me in the depths of your despair . In "in the depths ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Sentence Transformation- Doubt. For experts in Grammar! English Language

I have a doubt that is the following one: I have two alternative sentence transformations of this sentence below and, I wonder if it is possible to write the adverb "sometimes" before the subject ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

“Seductive” as an adjective for describing snake

I would really appreciate if some native English speaker help me in clearing my doubt. Recently, in one of Indian English newspaper the column writer wrote the following: "A scary sci-fi scenario. ...
5
votes
2answers
113 views

Is the term “Christian name” in decline in British English?

I learned most of my British English as a lad of thirteen in 1968–69 and one of twenty in 1975–76, during which (academic) years I lived in Sussex. As a Yank (I think that at least is ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

What else can you learn other than phrasal verb and idioms to sound like a native english speaker? [closed]

I have learnt a few phrasal verbs and idioms through a site that i found very helpful. I was wondering if there's anything else like this to learn to improve my English (I don't know what PV and ...
6
votes
1answer
53 views

Pronouncing the definite article

The definite article is mostly pronounced 'thuh' before a noun beginning with a consonant (thuh chair), and 'thee' in front of a noun beginning with a vowel (thee apple). Question 1: what is the name ...
2
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3answers
122 views

Femicide vs feminicide

While using the term femicide I realised that the is another term, probably a synonym, feminicide. From the following Wikipedia extract, the two terms appear to be synonyms: Femicide or ...
45
votes
3answers
3k views

What does “trodie” mean?

In "The Star Fraction" by Ken MacLeod, a Scottish science fiction author, a couple walks through a street and past a "trodie". The novel is set in Britain, so it may be a British expression. The ...
5
votes
0answers
126 views

Crepi il lupo in English? [closed]

What is the English version of the Italian: "In bocca al lupo / Crepi"Crepi il lupo"? Is this correct?: "Good luck! / Cracks the wolf"
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Is “mail” still used for “international correspondence” in British English?

While pondering this question asked earlier today, I started to wonder why post (in the sense of correspondence) is used in British English but not American English. So I looked up the etymology of ...
0
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1answer
45 views

The usage of “Per se”

Is the usage of the phrase "Per se" correct in this sentence? Sometimes, religion, though not be enaugh per se, may lead to violence.
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0answers
43 views

Word that Resembles The Dutch Word Kudde

Kudde, Couth, is there an english farmers word that resembles Kudde. Kudde means herd, flock, fold, drove, livestock, and bevy. So I'm looking for a word that means something along the lines of ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

How will “winning” be percieved?

If I use the phrase "winning business" as a byline to a logo. How will it generally be percieved? 1) Like a winning business 2) Like the act of winning business 3) Doesn't make any sense to have ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

x-stor(e)y or x-floor or x-level house/building?

Which is the correct for British English? I need the correct for both a separate house and an apartment building, if this makes difference. I can't find any concrete answer online.
0
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0answers
19 views

May “in with” be used to mean “among?”

I was thinking about how little I use the word among and how I would phrase the dictionary's example sentences for it. Most of it involved substitution with the word with. Then I noticed something. ...
2
votes
2answers
71 views

How offensive is calling someone “dodgy”?

Labour MP Dennis Skinner has been suspended from Parliament for the day for calling the Prime Minister "Dodgy Dave". I would like to know how serious of an insult it is. Can you put this insult to ...
4
votes
3answers
892 views

What are people, male or female, working in a Brothel, called?

They sure are not called call girls or hookers (absolutely not!). I don't believe "call girls" because these are people working in an establishment, right there, not making calls, not that 'kind'. ...
0
votes
2answers
80 views

What do you call a student who studies extra at home to become proficient?

What is the British English term for someone (a student) who goes home after classes and practices the lesson learned that day, or becomes proficient in the lesson taught? It is not a positive ...
6
votes
5answers
653 views

J. Oliver's usage of the word 'bog'

I have a question about the usage of the word 'bog' in the following sentence: Bog standard scoops of ice cream etc I understand that the meaning is 'form'; nevertheless, this is the first time ...
2
votes
2answers
78 views

polite questions vs. direct questions: real life reactions [closed]

In English courses (especially business), we learn to use polite questions. So we know that you shouldn't say "excuse me... where's the nearest supermarket, please?" but rather "excuse me... do you ...
-2
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0answers
35 views

Black-Guard or Blaggard - from the horses mouth [duplicate]

My father who was a British Solder in the 30s and served in various British Colonies, one day when looking through old photographs referred to one of himself with two uniformed black men in the ...
-1
votes
2answers
63 views

What is the origin of the British English saying: “It's got bits missing”?

I know someone from England who says this, in such a way that she assumes I have heard it, and that many people she knows say it... I find it amusing because it contrasts its Got with Missing. (She ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

'café' pronunciation

I've found recently a second variant of pronunciation of 'cafe' word: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/cafe. The usual one is /ˈkafeɪ/ ˈkæ-'fay But the OD link gives this too: ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

What does “in the corner, undone” mean?

(I'm guessing this is some British slang for being in jail or dead?) From the lyrics of Mika's "Dr. John": I look for joy in a strange place From the back of the bar From afar I see ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

Is “a few street away” a grammatically acceptable idiomatic expression in some dialect of UK English?

I am an American and I am reading a book titled Bloodmage by a British author named Stephen Aryan. He uses expressions I was previously unfamiliar with, such as "sat" instead of "sitting" (i.e., "sat ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

Is “take a bath” or “bathe” used to mean “take a shower” in some English dialects?

By analogy with Portuguese tomar banho [de chuveiro/ducha], which along with tomar uma ducha/chuveirada (Br.)/duche (Port.) means, take a shower, are there any parts of the English speaking world in ...
1
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0answers
69 views

For how long has “as” been synonymous with “because” in British English?

In British English, it seems that "because" can always be replaced with "as." Here is an example of "as" meaning "because" in British English: I popped down to the shops as we were out of loo ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Difference between 'REVERENCE' and 'DEFERENCE'

MY EFFORT: this a straight-forward question. I was practising for 'SAT' and met a question which required knowledge of difference between the afore-mentioned two words. I have searched the following 2 ...
-1
votes
2answers
76 views

Why can't I use “have” in given example? [closed]

How come in following sentence "have" is an incorrect word to use and "has" is correct one? "Working for many years in academic and administration fields have not only contributed to my professional ...
3
votes
1answer
61 views

What does it mean to “feel Humpty”?

I was reading a book written in the UK and a character stated that speaking to her sister made her "feel Humpty". I am not sure what she was feeling, as the rest of the dialogue gave no clue. Can ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

laden vs. loaded [closed]

I was justed asked whether it's a british idiom to say something, for example a car is 'fully laden' as in American English 'loaded' would be used. Does anyone here know about this issue? Thanks ...
10
votes
4answers
237 views

Did British chef Jamie Oliver redefine “pukka” in 1999?

Recently I've been watching cooking programmes: MasterChef Italia (addictive), MasterChef USA (awful), followed swiftly by Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares, and then onto Jamie Oliver's acclaimed The ...
2
votes
2answers
76 views

Capitalization of some common nouns in English texts

I’m a French web developer who translated a web site in English by a non-native but experienced English speaker (has lived in the US and UK for 15 years, worked in English for 20 years). I just ...