This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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7
votes
2answers
199 views

What is the entomology of “ligger”?

This answer on a prior question points out that ligger is defined by UrbanDictionary as: Ligger An individual who attends parties, openings, social gatherings and events with the sole ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

Is it good to leave things out on the pitch?

Started re-watching The West Wing recently, and came across the phrase "leave it all out on the field": Everyone's walking around here like we're finished. We have 365 more days… For both of us, ...
8
votes
0answers
57 views

How does the pronunciation of 'the' vary in British English?

In the months leading up to the UK Referendum, I've heard the phrase "the E.U." thousands of times, and I've noticed that nearly all media-speakers pronounce it as /ðəʔiːjuː/. My memory, and my old ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

Origin of the phrase “go west” (to die)

I was curious, what is the origin of the phrase "to go west" or "to pass into the west" (as in the sense of to die)?
5
votes
2answers
72 views

-— this for a game of soldiers

There is an idiom that seems to be distinctly British: "---- this for a game of soldiers" where the dashes are replaced with various swear words. For example: "Sod this for a game of soldiers." It ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

British English and “hospital” [duplicate]

I have noticed that British people often say things like "He was in hospital", omitting the word the before "hospital", which I would find to be more natural. Am I right in noticing that British ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

How important is the word “Please” when asking for something? [on hold]

How important is this word 'please' when asking someone you don't know for something? If you have already said "excuse me" is it still necessary? Is it more important than 'Thank you'? I have heard ...
2
votes
2answers
72 views

Is “reoccurring” a word and is there any semantic difference with “recurring”?

The internet seems divided on this one. Although, e.g., the Merriam-Webster dictionary does not list the word "reoccurring", dictionary.com does list it as a variant of "occur", and the Oxford ...
-1
votes
0answers
21 views

What does aspiration mean in phonology? [closed]

What does aspiration mean in phonology?
0
votes
2answers
66 views

What too-most means in “It was, too-most of his friends” [closed]

In a book(The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by: Douglas Adams) I am reading the following is said about a person: "The thing that used to worry him most was the fact that people always ...
4
votes
2answers
75 views

What is the meaning of this long line in this sentense?

I am reading "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen and encountered a strange dash in this sentence: "The officers of the ---- shire were in general [...]" ---- is a long line and not four single dashes....
2
votes
1answer
58 views

What is the origin of the phrase “guts for garters”?

Where does the phrase "guts for garters" come from? Example: I'd better stop mucking around on the Internet or my boss'll have my guts for garters. Someone having your guts for garters means ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

The difference between ironic and sarcastic? [duplicate]

The difference between the words irony and sarcasm?
19
votes
2answers
2k views

Don't grass me up!

"Grass", in British English, can be used as a verb or a noun to describe a police informer or the actions of said informer. Oxford gives: noun: British informal, A police informer. verb: ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Adverb of Frequency for “Sprint” [closed]

Re: Agile Software Development - Is there an accepted adverb to describe an activity that happens once per Sprint? Following the pattern daily, weekly, fortnightly etc, the obvious answer would seem ...
8
votes
3answers
574 views

What's the AmE and BrE for “tartaruga”

In Italian the the term "tartaruga" (turtle) is used also to refer to well defined abdominal muscles on the notion that they look like a turtle shell: Is there a slang/colloquial term or short ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

How to name on sort project by

I have a list of art and design project I do, some is for client (pay) , some is not (without pay): not start from client invite (like redesign a product exist, concept, or art ... ), or client not ...
27
votes
4answers
1k views

What are the nuances of the British expression “gone” used with time, as in “gone 8” or “gone midnight”?

An expression I have run across in British novels is "gone [hour]" like this: "It was gone midnight, and the house was quiet." The Midnight Witch by Paula Brackston "It's only just gone eight ...
2
votes
0answers
62 views

Reported Speech: preference for using that after say/tell

A student of mine has stated (based on her experience watching films and TV shows) that, when using Reported Speech, Americans will more often use 'he said that X' or 'he told us that X' whereas ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

how to name on duration rules

I have a list of tasks, each happening between a start time and an end time. I want to sort all tasks into 3 categories: Upcoming ? Current happening ? pass ? already end ? What are the ...
7
votes
0answers
226 views

British Mass Nouns versus American Count Nouns

British English often employs mass nouns where American English would only employ count nouns. Count nouns are nouns which take pluralization and numerical quantifiers like 'many'. Mass nouns can't be ...
-1
votes
0answers
23 views

“You do it” Stressing on the first person

There is an expression in my language which stresses on the person you are talking to. You would expect it in any informal conversation like this Person1: Wash the car, Jack. Jack: You do ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Cipher vs Cypher - British English vs American English [duplicate]

As an English author but long time resident of America, I recently wrote a historical spy thriller that delved deeply into coded messages. I often caught myself writing cipher and cypher. Although I ...
1
vote
3answers
44 views

Is using Answerer is correct? [closed]

If there is a position in a company that answers questions related to for example physics, what is the best word that describes this position? "Answerer of Questions related to Physics" ?
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Word to describe someone that has posted “proof”

Pretend locks cannot be picked. What would be a word to describe someone that has spent a long time writing an article full of absolute nonsense which they think is correct, believing for some reason ...
2
votes
0answers
38 views

Tuck someone under one's wing [closed]

To quote the sentence from Richard Templar's book The Rules of Life: "My grandfarther had taken early retirement owing to an industrial accident and my grandmother worked in a large department store ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Changing Spelling in Titles Based on AmE and BrE

For companies or corporations that have names that differ whether you are using AmE or BrE, should you change the title? For example, if I was referencing the the CDC, the Centers for Disease Control ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

What does the word “penty” mean? [closed]

And the word pent ? Are they very used in the british/american english ? Thank you for your help :)
1
vote
2answers
179 views

Centre of competence

I have seen this expression several times (Google search gives 67M answers), but it seems mostly used by French or Swiss institutions, while Wikipedia mentions centre of excellence or competency ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

“Wherever or Whenever”

Apologies for the title which sounds like the Shakira classic, but would you say "Thank you for providing help whenever possible" or "wherever possible"
0
votes
0answers
43 views

The United States. Possesive is its or their?

The United States made no secret of its/their hope to absorb the provinces... http://grammarist.com/usage/united-states/ "Although United States is usually treated as a singular noun, it’s treated ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

The use of “proceed” on the web

Recently I have been puzzled why the word proceed is found on most websites when the user is going to checkout, cart or shopping cart. Is there a reason for this in the english language that warrants ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

To encounter someone/something or to encounter with someone/something?

I have seen both forms and I don't know which one is the more appropriate (if there is a difference). The actual sentence in which I want to use it is "particles can encounter (with) the atoms of the ...
10
votes
5answers
3k views

When someone praises me awkwardly too much, how to reply? [closed]

When someone praises me awkwardly, as in too much, to make me happy or to get some help or something else from me, how to say "don't do that". Like, "I'll do that for you, you don't need to --- me." ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

What's a “summer-funeral hit”?

In a YouTube comment commenting on Jamala's song 1944, someone says You guys enjoy your summer-funeral hit! I have nothing else to add. after saying Ukraine should't have won! What a stupid,...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Different-colored or different colored? UK vs US English

Can I write "differently colored" instead? What expression most British or Americans would rather use? "socks, different in color" "socks of different colors" "a different color of each sock"
3
votes
4answers
81 views

Word that describes many common household purchases

I m writing a research paper about the over consumption. I am struggling to find a word or words that describes the things we normally use in our daily lives like toothbrush, dish washer liquid, ...
5
votes
1answer
123 views

Which words or grammar forms are likely to cause a collision between American and British English?

For all the Mickey-taking on both sides of the water I suppose British and American speakers understand one another 99% of the time. Can anyone think of any areas of vocabulary or grammar where ...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

“Five things to do for free” vs “Five free things to do” vs “Free five things to do” [closed]

I'm having a dilemma writing a slogan for my website. Website features articles of 5 free items to in specific locations. Which of the following taglines sounds most professional and British english?...
12
votes
4answers
399 views

Usage of “hysterical” meaning “very funny.”

One meaning (I am personally not very familiar with) of the adjective hysterical is: causing unrestrained laughter; very funny: Oh, that joke is hysterical! (Dictionary.com) No other ...
4
votes
1answer
223 views

Adele's pronunciation - Can't recognise some sounds in 'Rolling in the Deep'

I've listened to Rolling in the deep many times. But I still can't hear the words being pronounced, even when I know what they are. Think of me in the depths of your despair . In "in the depths ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Sentence Transformation- Doubt. For experts in Grammar! English Language

I have a doubt that is the following one: I have two alternative sentence transformations of this sentence below and, I wonder if it is possible to write the adverb "sometimes" before the subject "...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

“Seductive” as an adjective for describing snake

I would really appreciate if some native English speaker help me in clearing my doubt. Recently, in one of Indian English newspaper the column writer wrote the following: "A scary sci-fi scenario. ...
5
votes
2answers
114 views

Is the term “Christian name” in decline in British English?

I learned most of my British English as a lad of thirteen in 1968–69 and one of twenty in 1975–76, during which (academic) years I lived in Sussex. As a Yank (I think that at least is ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

What else can you learn other than phrasal verb and idioms to sound like a native english speaker? [closed]

I have learnt a few phrasal verbs and idioms through a site that i found very helpful. I was wondering if there's anything else like this to learn to improve my English (I don't know what PV and ...
6
votes
1answer
56 views

Pronouncing the definite article

The definite article is mostly pronounced 'thuh' before a noun beginning with a consonant (thuh chair), and 'thee' in front of a noun beginning with a vowel (thee apple). Question 1: what is the name ...
2
votes
3answers
130 views

Femicide vs feminicide

While using the term femicide I realised that the is another term, probably a synonym, feminicide. From the following Wikipedia extract, the two terms appear to be synonyms: Femicide or ...