This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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0
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1answer
6 views

Does “key challenge” mean the primary source that causes the challenge?

I am confused which one is the key challenge? a growing demand for skilled accounting professionals that leads to a talent crunch or a talent crunch that leads to a growing demand for skilled ...
0
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0answers
35 views

Use of 'floor' instead of 'ground' when referring to exterior surfaces

I've noticed more and more lately in UK English that people say, for example: He fell to the floor. when they're describing an exterior situation. I would always have said He fell to the ...
-2
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0answers
32 views

“If you please” and informal talk

can you suggest me a informal way to say " We can meet on next weekend,if you please" Is this grammatically correct? and could you suggest me more way to say this in informal talk Thanks in advance!!...
4
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3answers
68 views

What would be the proper usage of “Qua” in a sentence?

I'm a native English speaker, but I'm trying to expand my vocabulary slightly. I looked this up online, and the definition for it baffled me. How exactly would I go about using this particular word?
0
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1answer
41 views

Take your hands out “of / from” your pockets

Which is proper: Take your hands out of your pockets. Take your hands out from your pockets. Is there any difference in American English and British English? P.S. Also reading the ...
2
votes
1answer
27 views

In British English is it acceptable to say “securitization”?

In general I find the financial term "securitization" written with "z", but in some Basel Committee documents I've found "securitisation" with "s". I think it is more common the term with "z", may I ...
25
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8answers
5k views

What's the English equivalent for the Italian slang expression “magna magna”

"Magna magna" is a typical Italian slang expression used by common people to give vent to their frustrations and disappointment with politicians when cases of corruption and personal interest in ...
-7
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0answers
35 views

use of has have,have have,has has,have had,had had [closed]

Please let me know the uses of the above verbs as soon as possible as my examinations are knocking at the door.
3
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1answer
107 views

What do you call 'underground floors' in AmE and BrE?

I understand that the word basement means: the part of a building that is wholly or partly below ground level [Merriam-Webster] But I wonder what American English and British English call 'the ...
3
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1answer
55 views

Are these mispronunciations by my British English text-to-speech engine a reflection of an actual British English usage?

A little context: I'm a native speaker of American English. I use Google's text-to-speech engine with the British voice, as I find the roboticness (roboticity?) of delivery to be less distracting in a ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

'There is no such a thing as a free lunch' in academic writing [closed]

In the context of an academic publication in British English, I'm tempted to paraphrase the expression "There is no such a thing as a free lunch". Does it sound too informal and, if so, are there ...
3
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2answers
86 views

Does “shore” require the “r” sound in the pronunciation (UK pronunciation)?

In the Cambridge Dictionary I see the pronunciation of the word shore is represented by /ʃɔːr/. In the WordReference dictionary it is instead pronounced as /ʃɔː/. The "r" sound is silent in the last ...
3
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1answer
32 views

Rule for if a verb can take -ing (simple present vs present cont.)? eg. I love vs I am loving

As a BrE. speaker, there are come constructions using verbs in their present continuous form which just sound wrong. The best example being, "I am loving Stack Exchange." After reading around the ...
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0answers
45 views

I can understand English, but I can't speak! [migrated]

This is my problem: If an English man is speaking, I can understand him well.. I've read too many English novels and story,, I can understand an English movie without any subtitle.. and when I ...
-3
votes
1answer
46 views

Do vs Dost, the difference [closed]

"Thou coward knight, why wilt thou not do battle with me?" -The Age of Chivalry, Chapter 16 In this sentence, why is do not dost? Very commonly do I see the word dost be used in older text in place ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

what is the meaning of “strange pub”?

"You cannot order it in a strange pub..." I found this when I was solving a crossword.. I'm wondering what dose the "strange pub" mean? According to the dictionary.com the "pub" is a British slang ...
3
votes
1answer
35 views

What is an 'end-of-the-pier entertainment'?

Reading "Nothing To Be Frightened Of" by Julian Barnes I found this phrase. This is the full paragraph. If there were a games-playing God, He would surely get especial ludic pleasure from ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

How is a misuse of punctuation spacing perceived by native British and American people?

I am a Frenchie and an English enthusiast. In my language, we use spaces before quotation marks, exclamation marks, and colons. While I'm aware that this is not the case in English, there are times ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

What does “the Park” mean in spy novels? [on hold]

What does"the Park" mean in spy novels? I can read it as "head quarter", but not sure. And in that case, how does that word come from?
3
votes
2answers
77 views

Deletion of /h/

I was once told by my BrE teacher that when we have a word ending with a consonant followed by another word starting with h, the h is deleted, meaning that the pronunciation is different. For ...
10
votes
1answer
303 views

Origin of the slang AmE and BrE usage of “beef”

Beef began its life as an intransitive verb in 1888 and soon took on the noun meaning in 1899 appearing in such expressions as "What's your beef? and "I had a beef with him" (not a steak). Beef ...
5
votes
3answers
86 views

Is there any difference between “I'm sat” and “I'm sitting”?

In BrE, one can apparently use I'm sat here to mean I'm sitting here. This seems to be a relatively modern usage: I had originally thought that this was a regional or dialectical variant and had ...
4
votes
1answer
86 views

In which regional dialects is “I'm sat” common?

I had always associated the construct I'm sat here (as opposed to I'm sitting here) with the north of England. I know I've heard it from people with Yorkshire or Manchester accents, for example. Yet, ...
24
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3answers
2k views

Why are “slip roads” called that way?

Slip roads are used to allow vehicles to merge in a road whose speed is higher or, conversely, let them leave it safely. This term appears to be British English usage. Here is an example of usage: ...
0
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0answers
23 views

Can the word USUAL become an adverb?

Looking at this sentence - 'The children seem their usual amount of tired.' I'm trying to figure out whether the word USUAL is an adverb in this sentence or not? To me it gives further information ...
2
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0answers
37 views

Stepping down vs Standing down [closed]

Could someone explain the difference ? Context: BBC headlines "UKIP leader Nigel Farage stands down" "Chris Evans to step down as Top Gear presenter"
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0answers
60 views

What's the name for a podium with numbers? [migrated]

I don't know what this is called. Is it a podium?
1
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1answer
39 views

What does the word “whereabouts” mean, and how do I respond to it?

If someone asks me the following questions after I tell them I'm going to be in a certain country, what specifically do they want to know? For example, Someone: "Oh, so you are going to Indonesia....
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0answers
23 views

Omitting the verb and complement in an answer [closed]

I was watching Person of Interest, where this bit of conversation happened: -We can't leave him here. -I'm not. As in "I'm not leaving him here". Even though it's perfectly understandable, ...
0
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0answers
20 views

One word verb for “Used to tell”

please give me a good One word verb for "Used to tell". Sentence : My father used to tell me, “Mr. X reads newspapers , magazines published all over the country......." Please make the whole part ...
11
votes
4answers
2k views

Bringing your sick to Jesus [closed]

Does this Bible verse have the same unfortunate double meaning in American English as it does in British English? The photo is taken from the 1984 translation of the (US) NIV. It looks as though ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

What is a “longstop”? (British, I think)

I've come across this word applied to God in a book by Julian Barnes but I don't understand it. And perhaps God doesn't mind being addressed only in emergency. It may seem to bystanders that ...
5
votes
2answers
314 views

What is the entomology of “ligger”?

This answer on a prior question points out that ligger is defined by UrbanDictionary as: Ligger An individual who attends parties, openings, social gatherings and events with the sole ...
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0answers
30 views

Is it good to leave things out on the pitch?

Started re-watching The West Wing recently, and came across the phrase "leave it all out on the field": Everyone's walking around here like we're finished. We have 365 more days… For both of us, ...
12
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1answer
384 views

How does the pronunciation of 'the' vary in British English?

In the months leading up to the UK Referendum, I've heard the phrase "the E.U." thousands of times, and I've noticed that nearly all media-speakers pronounce it as /ðəʔiːjuː/. My memory, and my old ...
3
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1answer
69 views

Origin of the phrase “go west” (to die)

I was curious, what is the origin of the phrase "to go west" or "to pass into the west" (as in the sense of to die)?
5
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2answers
98 views

-— this for a game of soldiers

There is an idiom that seems to be distinctly British: "---- this for a game of soldiers" where the dashes are replaced with various swear words. For example: "Sod this for a game of soldiers." It ...
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0answers
48 views

British English and “hospital” [duplicate]

I have noticed that British people often say things like "He was in hospital", omitting the word the before "hospital", which I would find to be more natural. Am I right in noticing that British ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

How important is the word “Please” when asking for something? [closed]

How important is this word 'please' when asking someone you don't know for something? If you have already said "excuse me" is it still necessary? Is it more important than 'Thank you'? I have heard ...
2
votes
2answers
85 views

Is “reoccurring” a word and is there any semantic difference with “recurring”?

The internet seems divided on this one. Although, e.g., the Merriam-Webster dictionary does not list the word "reoccurring", dictionary.com does list it as a variant of "occur", and the Oxford ...
0
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2answers
71 views

What too-most means in “It was, too-most of his friends” [closed]

In a book(The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by: Douglas Adams) I am reading the following is said about a person: "The thing that used to worry him most was the fact that people always ...
4
votes
2answers
83 views

What is the meaning of this long line in this sentense?

I am reading "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen and encountered a strange dash in this sentence: "The officers of the ---- shire were in general [...]" ---- is a long line and not four single dashes....
2
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1answer
69 views

What is the origin of the phrase “guts for garters”?

Where does the phrase "guts for garters" come from? Example: I'd better stop mucking around on the Internet or my boss'll have my guts for garters. Someone having your guts for garters means ...
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0answers
24 views

The difference between ironic and sarcastic? [duplicate]

The difference between the words irony and sarcasm?
19
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2answers
2k views

Don't grass me up!

"Grass", in British English, can be used as a verb or a noun to describe a police informer or the actions of said informer. Oxford gives: noun: British informal, A police informer. verb: ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Adverb of Frequency for “Sprint” [closed]

Re: Agile Software Development - Is there an accepted adverb to describe an activity that happens once per Sprint? Following the pattern daily, weekly, fortnightly etc, the obvious answer would seem ...
8
votes
3answers
584 views

What's the AmE and BrE for “tartaruga”

In Italian the the term "tartaruga" (turtle) is used also to refer to well defined abdominal muscles on the notion that they look like a turtle shell: Is there a slang/colloquial term or short ...
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0answers
25 views

How to name on sort project by

I have a list of art and design project I do, some is for client (pay) , some is not (without pay): not start from client invite (like redesign a product exist, concept, or art ... ), or client not ...
29
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4answers
1k views

What are the nuances of the British expression “gone” used with time, as in “gone 8” or “gone midnight”?

An expression I have run across in British novels is "gone [hour]" like this: "It was gone midnight, and the house was quiet." The Midnight Witch by Paula Brackston "It's only just gone eight ...
2
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0answers
68 views

Reported Speech: preference for using that after say/tell

A student of mine has stated (based on her experience watching films and TV shows) that, when using Reported Speech, Americans will more often use 'he said that X' or 'he told us that X' whereas ...