This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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1answer
36 views

Antonym for the word “Engineering”

"Engineering" is the word used for construction or creation (if I am not wrong). Searching in thesaurus to find the antonym. Suggestions please..
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Whatever tickles their fancy in the US?

The delightful-sounding tickle your fancy is, I think, one of those rare idioms where the word order can be reversed and its meaning changes; the request: fancy a tickle? said with a raised eyebrow ...
0
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0answers
36 views

Help In Creating A Word (The grammar of the alphabets) [on hold]

I create a username generator app which takes account of how certain letters can only come after certain letters. So basically I need a column of the alphabet followed by a list of the letters that ...
5
votes
2answers
313 views

British English spelling: “gripped” or “gript”?

Hello what is the correct British English spelling of the word 'gripped' or 'gript'? According to Dictionary.com: gript verb 1. a past participle and simple past tense of grip. verb ...
-1
votes
1answer
60 views

Is 'gotten' a proper/legitimate word?

According to what I was taught as school, the past tense of 'get' is 'got' and 'gotten' is "an American corruption and, therefore, is not a proper word". Example: "Should auld acquaintance be ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Words play - does it have a special name in English? How to do the same with 'security' word for example?

By looking at this picture: Or at the title of this album: You can see that the authors used there something which I call a word game. My question is, does doing so has an official name? How can ...
-1
votes
1answer
29 views

Determiners in English sentence vs. plurals, singulars and zero determiners. Is it ok to say?

Do I need any determiners in the sentence below in general statement? Strong winds destroy homes. Is it ok to say in English in specific situation? The strong wind destroyed the homes in North ...
2
votes
2answers
56 views

Pronunciation of word “considered”

I have learned in school that letter 'r' is not sounded in the word 'considered', here's an example. But I have been watching the 'How I met your mother' series, and Ted have pronounced that with ...
-1
votes
0answers
20 views

Those who or who [migrated]

Thank you, Lord, for the teachers those who care for me. Thank you, Lord, for the teachers who care for me. Which of these two would be more correct? Thanks in advance.
0
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0answers
7 views

What should I use “can” or “could”? [migrated]

I am stucking at "can" and "could" definition in my words sentence.What should i use? [Like ebay Auction rule] 1.You are responsible to pay the charges within 7 days after won. If not,you couldn't ...
-4
votes
1answer
42 views

what is the right way to greet someone while meeting first time in a day? [on hold]

i just wanted to curious to know this that when ever people meet someone they used to say good morning or good evening depend upon the situation and the time . what is the right way to greet someone ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

“Enjoin” vs “Adjure”

"Enjoin" means to direct someone with emphasis and authority. "Adjure" means to command in a serious manner. Are the two words used in different contexts?
1
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1answer
43 views

Telling the time - Minute 01 to 09 [duplicate]

What would be the most frequent/common way of telling the time when the minute is between 01 and 09? Is there any difference between BE and AmE? 5:03 -> 1) five oh three 2) five three 3) three ...
0
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0answers
50 views

Is there a complete list of every word allowed in the game 'Scrabble'? [closed]

I am looking for a complete list of every allowed word in the English-language Scrabble game. Does anyone know of any good places to find this? Preferable as a simple '.txt' file, but any information ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

What kind of question-tag is this: “I was in the bath, wasn't I?” Is it polite? rude?

Context: (BrE) - a friend is complaining... a- "I phoned you three times this morning but you never answered." b- "I was in the bath, wasn't I? Why the question-tag, if the listener had no idea ...
-3
votes
0answers
29 views

What is the simplest way to prepare the IELTS? [closed]

What is the simplest way to prepare the IELTS and How I got the highest band in IELTS?
0
votes
1answer
11 views

Does Noun phrases comprise prepositions too?

Does Noun phrases comprise prepositions too? For example: -The apple in the fridge is mine. Here the noun phrase is "The apple in the fridge" or just "The apple"?
1
vote
4answers
465 views

“I usually knock off at 6”

"I usually knock off at 6", i heard an english gentleman say that. Does it sound odd only to me? In fact, what I heard was "I usually masturbate at 6" Did some research: found a book (i'm guessing ...
1
vote
2answers
41 views

Combining two sentences for title

I want to combine the following sentence: Relationship between son and mother, and relationship between daughter and mother Into one sentence for title of an article: Relationship between son, ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

How can I use the phrase, “do right by”?

1) How can I use the phrase, "do right by"? 2) And what does it mean exactly when we say that? 3) Can I say, I hope they do right by me? Or I hope he/she does right by me?
3
votes
2answers
110 views

If someone says “They insisted that he left”, is there any ambiguity in BrE or in AmE?

Do they mean something like "please go! You must leave!" or could it be "We assure you that he left"?
0
votes
0answers
4 views

what is the place of these 2 words “known” and “preserved” in the following sentence? [migrated]

what is the place of these 2 words "known" and "preserved" in the following sentence? The Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc Cave in the Ardèche department of southern France is a cave that contains the earliest ...
0
votes
0answers
73 views

Is it easier/faster to recognise digits or written words? [migrated]

Does anyone know of any evidence to indicate whether it is faster and/or easier for a native English speaker to recognise digits (1, 2, 3, 4) vs. full written English word equivalents (one, two, ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

“is much a news in the moment”?

I'm trying to understand what is said in this video between 00:27 and 00:35... I can understand the beginning, "With religion, community relations and tolerance", but... And then? I'm listening this ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Is there any authoritative source from where we can find out if a phrase or figure of speech is American English or British English? [closed]

For example the figure of speech " One swallow doesn't make a summer" is British English. Similarly the figure of speech 'All hat and no cattle" is American English. Is there any source from where ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Phrases used to replace“ I think” [closed]

Can anybody suggest phrases or sentences I can use instead of "I think" when it comes to giving opinions Thank you.
0
votes
1answer
48 views

What are lexemes and morphemes? [closed]

I am preparing for my TOEFL test and want to increase my vocabulary. Can anybody please tell me what lexemes and morphemes are, and why they are important? I have Googled the terms but I need the ...
1
vote
0answers
53 views

Answers for questions with “have to” and “have got to”?

Do we have to stay? a. Yes, we do. b. Yes, we have. c. Yes, we have to. Have we got to stay? a. Yes, we do. b. Yes, we have. c. Yes, we have to. I have to go home. a. Do you? b. Have you? ...
2
votes
2answers
80 views

What is the grammar of these two sentence from 'The Economist'?

To arrive at an answer, Mr Harris combs through what remains of our pre-internet lives, separating the things we will carry forward into the connected world from the worthy things we may leave ...
-2
votes
2answers
63 views

Someone who reads too much into things or over analyses things

Is there a single word for someone who reads too much into things? Examples from the freedictionary: This statement means exactly what it says. Don't try to read anything else into it. ...
1
vote
2answers
285 views

In what English-speaking communities does “trump” refer to the breaking of wind?

It is clear from this site that the verb to trump has been used extensively across Britain to refer to the breaking of wind. It is especially the case in the North, in Wales and certainly in Norfolk, ...
0
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0answers
30 views

Should I use comma or not before “wearing”? [migrated]

recently i saw a sentence like this "Did a guy just go by here wearing a hat?" in my opinion,it should be something like"Did a guy wearing a hat just go by here?" . i was thinking it should be ...
3
votes
3answers
107 views

What word(s) do children of English native speakers use for “kid”/“child”/etc

I'm looking for (a) word(s) that is/are perceived to be child's language by adults, not words used by adults to describe children. What would be fine though are words used by adults when they are ...
-2
votes
1answer
50 views

We like a name but dont know how to spell it? [closed]

We like the sound of Mill-eat-a but dont know how to spell it so that shortens to Millie and not milie as in cyrus
4
votes
2answers
381 views

Did the modern British accent originate from a speech impediment? [closed]

I have heard a theory that the modern British pronunciation (as compared, for example, to American pronunciation) started when somebody in the monarchy had a speech impediment (perhaps rhotacism) and, ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Is it acceptable to make a question by adding “or” at the end?

Example: "It is unacceptable for young ladies to put up their bare feet in public railway carriages, or?" I only ask because the germans do it all the time as in: "Ich habe dir schon einmal darum ...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

Are there linguistic markers that indicate to subordinates a desire to be addressed less formally

It's a bit of a shame that Is "pal" too informal when the other person is much older than me? was closed, as it dabbles in a difficult topic for all non-native speakers of English. Although ...
9
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4answers
2k views

50s synonym for “snogging”

What would the British term in 1954 have been for "snogging"? "Making out" is American. "All over each other" doesn't seem quite specific enough.
3
votes
3answers
106 views

Can there be a difference between learned and learnt?

To the best of my knowledge, there is no difference in meaning between learnt and the single-syllable form of learned. This is supported by the answers to When do you use "learnt" and when "learned"? ...
1
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6answers
121 views

Looking for a word like “eulogy”, but for a person that has not died?

I was thinking of words like the "background" of a person? Their overall qualities summarised into a short form. Eulogy might be a bad example, as it implies praise. A word meaning "a summary of ...
-2
votes
1answer
126 views

Is there different word corresponding to “teatime” in American English?

There is a British English term "teatime" or "afternoon tea". I'm wondering how people refer to it in American English.
0
votes
2answers
45 views

what does “casting a long silver of gold” mean?

so, today I was reading this book and I came across this sentence: "At the very end of the passage, a door stood ajar, and a flickering light shone through the gap, casting a long silver of gold ...
0
votes
1answer
94 views

Is written “Canadian English” closer to “American English” or “British English”?

I'm having some writing done for a website aimed at a Canadian audience. In order to leverage our resources more, I'd like to focus on "American English" or "British English". So, is written ...
0
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0answers
53 views

What is British English for American English's “wire transfer”

This question is closely related to this one but is a little bit different. I'm in the U.S., and I'm attending a conference in Germany. The language of the conference is English. The instructions ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

What's “Blumenthal” as an adjective (UK)

I'm an American reading a series of humorous kitchen-gadget reviews in The Guardian, and the author describes a particular food dehydrator as something that "makes you feel just a little bit ...
-6
votes
1answer
67 views

Find the grammatical error in sentence [closed]

Q1 it is time we should have done something useful. can any body explain that error ?
0
votes
1answer
102 views

Archaic English new words: from a Nigerian [closed]

A Nigerian Governor was being interviewed by a local Television station. He was speaking of the political situation of Rivers state in Nigeria. Nigeria is an English speaking country because it was a ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

Which English to use in Portugal: British or American? [closed]

I'm not sure this is the right place to ask this, but any help is appreciated. I'm Portuguese, but I also use English for my work. For that, I use dictionaries in my computer. My question is: which ...
0
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0answers
59 views

Is the word,“Whilst”, not used in US English?

In my spare time i sometimes help out a good friend of mine. He is a professional translator, self-employed so he can pretty much pick his own assignments, which is a good position to be in, but i ...
0
votes
2answers
65 views

How, as a parent, do I address a teacher (in the UK)?

In semi/non-official correspondence, how a parent should address a teacher of their children? Dear Miss Lastname, Dear Ms Lastname, Dear Firstname or something else? I know it's more about ...