3
votes
2answers
225 views

meaning of bare infinitivals

[i] I saw her clean the room. [ii] He helped me do the work. [iii] She made me clean the room.         What makes you think so?         ...
2
votes
0answers
34 views

“I've got more to do than wait” or “I've got more to do than **to** wait”? [duplicate]

I did some reading in other places online about using the bare infinitive after the word "than," and while in a lot of cases it seems correct, I'm having a hard time telling whether it's correct in ...
1
vote
1answer
228 views

“Help” as a Non-Modal verb

Please read the following sentence: Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is planning his retirement in the next nine months from the software giant he helped build. Would you consider "helped" a ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Non-finite clause complementation of complex transitive verbs

This question has been bothering me for a while. It came up when I was reading Chapter 16 of "A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language." How to explain the grammatical structure of the ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

Repeating “to” and “will” in enumerations of verbs

Should I use the second "will" in constructions like this one: "it will definitely help you and will make the text more readable" And should I write "to" before every infinitive in enumeration, or ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

“To enable him to escape” vs. “to enable him escape”

I have been coming across this kind of sentence more and more: She gave him a key to enable him to escape capture. She gave him a key to enable him escape capture. Which sentence is correct? ...
5
votes
4answers
5k views

What is an “infinitive”?

I've heard that a verb usually follows the 'infinitive' but how does one define an 'infinitive'?
3
votes
10answers
988 views

Is this grammatical construction an imperative for the third person?

Is the construction 'Let + subject + verb' considered as an order/imperative for the third person: Let every man count his days when it is intended to mean 'must'/'is ordered to'?