An auxiliary verb modifies the main verb to give more information about the main verb.

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What are all the words that make up a complete list of linking verbs in English?

What are all the words that make up a complete list of linking verbs in English? My English teacher from what I can remember listed them as follows, am I missing any? is • am • are • was • were • ...
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IS or ARE? Simple question! [duplicate]

In this sentence: The ​insurance ​premium is ​small ​potatoes ​compared to what we'd have to ​pay if the ​house ​burned down. "Small potatoes" is a plural noun, but why is the auxiliary verb ...
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Does using “did” to form the past tense make a difference? [duplicate]

The two sentences here both indicate that, at some point in the past, I performed some work: I did work I worked What is the difference between these two sentences? Does constructing one with did ...
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38 views

“Are” or “Is” when linking two singular nouns in a sentence?

When you are talking about about two singular nouns and link them together in a sentence with a conjunction such as "and" which verb form is correct? For example, would you say "Where is the broom ...
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1answer
52 views

Do I need to repeat the 'have' before the second verb?

I wonder whether it is optional/necessary that I repeat the 'have' in the sentence below (from an academic writing) While both aforementioned approaches have enjoyed many success stories and have ...
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1answer
60 views

What is the question tag for: "They got the answers, ____?

What would be the appropriate question tag for the sentence "They got the answers yesterday, ______?" Is haven't they the correct question tag? I would also like to know the different ...
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Use of Do/Does with indefinite pronouns

I am new! We all know that we use does with third-person singular (noun or pronoun, (definite or indefinite), but I am really confused about two things: How can I know that the given indefinite ...
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Can we say “you can [not go] to school” or does it automatically become a negative sentence? [duplicate]

"You can [not go] to school." Can this sentence mean that you can stay here and not go, or does it automatically become a negative sentence if I say it like this?
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If it's “I am” and not “I are”, why is it “I aren't” instead of “I amn't”? [duplicate]

I've been taught to say "I am" and "I aren't", but that doesn't make any sense to me. I think it should have been "I amn't" as am+not=amn't, but why isn't it?
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Why are present participle and infinitive equally acceptable for some verbs, but not others?

This question about "started teaching/to teach" made me realise that even though the present participle and infinitive are both acceptable after "started", that's not the case with other superficially ...
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Difference between would and will

Thank you for your time reading this. I am from China and have learned British English for years from my middle school to undergraduate time. I normally take 'would' as the past form of 'will', ...
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Are copulars considered linking, helping, or auxiliaries?

I'm having a hard time understanding why most people consider the infinitive to be and all of its verb base forms helping verbs. I've consulted multiple English grammar sites and forums, and most of ...
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1answer
56 views

Did + multiple bare infinitives in a question

What is the proper way to combine past tense of do (did) with multiple bare infinitives in a question: Did you go to vacation or stay at home? Did you go to vacation or stayed at home? Did you go to ...
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54 views

Question without auxiliary verb [duplicate]

Consider the conversation below. Is the last question correct? A: What did you think about it? B: I thought it was terrible. A: You thought it was terrible? It sounds a bit strange without ...
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Wh-questions: auxiliary verbs or not?

What's the difference between these two questions: Why they chose football? and Why did they choose football?
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“Who wrote … ?” or “Who did write … ?” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is there no form of “do” in questions of the type “who knows?” I want to know which is the correct way to ask this question: Who wrote ...
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4answers
601 views

When was the form “is become” first used?

In the famous “Hallelujah” chorus from Handel’s Messiah, a line goes: The kingdom of this world is become the Kingdom of our Lord. I’ve noticed similar forms in many biblical texts and ...
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2answers
150 views

Position of Adverbs in Negative Sentences [closed]

How am I supposed to write the sentences below in the negative form? Example A: A.1) Lila is certainly not going to be very happy about it or A.2) Lila isn't certainly going to be very ...
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3answers
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“Didn't” or “Wouldn't”?

When I was in high school, a mosquito bite used to be itchy for many weeks. It didn't subside for a month or more. Is the word didn't proper here or should I use wouldn't? Wouldn't sounds ...
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“Would rather [infinitive1] than [infinitive2]” vs. “would rather that [subjunctive]”"

I am aware of sentences like Beth would rather study at the library than go to parties. There is another type of using rather that: She would rather that the plane leave early in the ...
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3answers
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“I haven't got” vs. “I don't have”

Which is the correct way of saying this in English? I haven't got any money. I don't have any money. If both are correct, which is the difference between them?
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“Wrote it I did” Is this grammatical?

Are the following two examples grammatical? Write it I have. Wrote it I did. Consider as possible contexts: They said that I have to write it, and write it I have. -- (for #1) They ...
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Why would he do this to me?

Do the following two statements convey the same meaning? Why would he do this to me? Why did he do this to me? To me, both of them seem to imply something done to me in the past.
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2answers
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Can I use “will” as non-auxiliary verb?

I was in England and I heard that some people use word "will" as non auxiliary verb, in meaning "wish". Have I misheard? If it is true, in which cases can I use "will" as non auxiliary verb?
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Seconds has/have passed

Which is proper? The method will be fired after the specified duration of seconds has passed. OR The method will be fired after the specified duration of seconds have passed.
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Is “is” an auxiliary verb?

John is working now. Is the verb 'is' in this example an auxiliary verb?
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Do I have to use the auxiliary before all the verbs?

Which of the following is correct? I will dance and sing at the concert tonight. I will dance and will sing at the concert tonight. Does it happen with to, too? For example: I ...
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2answers
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“To be an influence” or “to have an influence”

Is there a rule for when one has to say to be a positive influence on... or to have a positive influence on...? For example, The practice of singing songs is/has a positive influence on people.
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'Have had,' auxiliary & main verb [closed]

I am still a little confused as to what tense I am using when I say She has had a lot of bad luck lately Am I using the past simple with the present perfect and had as an auxiliary verb? ...
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2answers
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Position of interrogative auxiliary verbs as replies to statements [closed]

Imagine someone states the following to you: I think you're mistaken. We've never traveled to Italy together. What's the difference between the following two responses, if any? Haven't we? ...
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“I wish I would wake up early”

Is this sentence correct? I wish I would wake up early Some grammar rules say that would shouldn't be used when its subject is the same as wish subject. It ‘would be illogical’, the rule says. ...
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1answer
141 views

“The delegation will depart and will be accompanied” vs. “will depart and be accompanied”

(a) The delegation will depart from the embassy at 9 A.M. and will be accompanied to the airport by the Minister of Sports. (b) The delegation will depart from the embassy at 9 A.M. and be ...
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Adverb location according to auxiliary verb

Even though there are examples of location of adverb related to auxiliary verb, I am still doubtful about where to put the adverb in this particular example. I need to make a very formal sentence: ...
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Can a person say “And I you”?

In a film I thought I heard a man say "And I you." I wondered if it were OK because there seemed to be no verb? Another man said to him "I like you my buddy". So why did he not reply "So do I ...
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Using 'would' to form reasons

In the following examples: Why would anyone want to eat something so horrible? Who would live for forever? Why would I ever lie to you? Is 'would' being used to refer to time in future or past Or ...
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Subject + “have had” + bare infinitive … ever correct?

In writing an email today I came up with the following sentence: "We have had two other ladies express an interest in the room." I'm a native English-English speaker and this felt fine to me. My ...
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1answer
832 views

Passive auxiliary verb or progressive one?

Uncle Vernon made another funny noise, like a mouse being trodden on.                —Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone Is ‘being’ a passive auxiliary verb or a progressive one?
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Is it correct to say “It was not happened”?

Is it correct to say "It was not happened"? I have heard people saying "It was not happening" or "It didn't happen" but "It was not happened" is new to me.
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2answers
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about 'couldn't' [closed]

Does anyone know what's wrong with 'couldn't' in the following? I think there couldn’t be any trains today due to the strike, so I’m going by bus. What's interesting is that, There ...
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“She is gone” versus “she has gone”

When should I say "She is gone", and when should I say "She has gone" (and why)? I think that when I mean "She went away and she's still there", it should be "She has gone". Are there exceptions ...
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“Have not” versus “do not have”

As a non-native English speaker, I have a little doubt about using, or not, the auxiliary verb "to do" with the verb "to have". Are there differences in meaning between "I have not" and "I do not ...
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1answer
184 views

Context for “He never DID like her” and “He always DID like her”

I am trying to understand the usage of focused do/does/did that are preceded by adverbs such as never, always, still, etc. Are the following conversions idiomatic? A: John liked Mary before. B: No! ...
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3answers
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Are modal verbs and auxiliary verbs actually verbs?

A friend recently told me that "can" is a rare verb without an infinitive. I have since looked it up and discovered it is an auxiliary verb. In my mind it modifies a "proper" verb in much the same way ...
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Is usually tired, usually tired, and feels tired?

She is usually tired after coming back from school. She usually tired after coming back from school. She usually feels tired after coming back from school. Which one is correct? ...
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Is “am going” a verb phrase?

What part of a sentence is the phrase "am going", as in "I am going to pray"?
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2answers
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“Start to Inf.” vs. “start V-ing” [duplicate]

I want to know about usage of "start + action" and "stop + action". Which one of followin are correct or preferred? For ex. When shall I start working? When shall I stop working? Or ...
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2answers
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Using do not and don't (I do not think of it)

Man: What do you think of the view? Droid: I do not think of it. Man: I don't think of it. I don't. Droids and apostrophes, I could write a book, except you are... barely a droid anymore. (c) Deep ...
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Is “You might could talk to her family” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Following up my previous questions on the usage of the word / phrase ('banzai' and 'ring the cherries') in Thomas Harris' thriller, ”The Silence of Lambs,” I came across the following passage in the ...
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“I am gonna have to” vs. “I have to”

What is the difference between "I am gonna have to" and "I have to"? When would you use the first one? update: I am specifically asking about situations like the one described here.