0
votes
1answer
69 views

Tenses in the clause “was about to do” [closed]

There are two verbs in the clause "was about to do", and I think I have established that "was" is an auxiliary verb, but I am unsure of what the verb "do" is. It is not a present participle, but I ...
3
votes
2answers
138 views

'Have had,' auxiliary & main verb

I am still a little confused as to what tense I am using when I say She has had a lot of bad luck lately Am I using the past simple with the present perfect and had as an auxiliary verb? ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Rules of thumb on using the correct tense forms and auxiliary verbs

For example, when using "since", you should use "present perfect": Mr Smith _ _ _ the company since 1990. runs has run is running ran Is there any reference on similar rules, ...
0
votes
2answers
97k views

When do we use “had had” and “have had”? [duplicate]

I have seen several sentences in English where some writers have written had twice in a row. I am a bit confused about when the grammar calls for using had had. For example: I had had my car ...
16
votes
3answers
1k views

When did periphrastic tenses stop being tenses?

English sometimes has several different ways of expressing the same thing. For example, it can form a possessive either by using an old case inflection: The dog’s tail was always wagging. Or it ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Using 'would' to form reasons

In the following examples: Why would anyone want to eat something so horrible? Who would live for forever? Why would I ever lie to you? Is 'would' being used to refer to time in future or past Or ...
2
votes
2answers
271 views

Choosing Past Simple or Past Perfect: Do I need “had” here?

Do I need "had" here? If yes, do I need to change "did" to "done"? A: Lucy accidentally broke her mum’s favorite cup yesterday. B: Oh! I think her mom was really angry at her, right? A: ...
0
votes
4answers
3k views

“Were gone” vs. “had gone” [closed]

Whats the difference between: She were gone to party. She had gone to party. Are they both ok?
5
votes
2answers
693 views

When can “have” be used without “got”?

I read this article and now I'm confused when got can be omitted when using have. Could this be explained in plain English without technical terms? Is there a different usage in past tense?
23
votes
10answers
9k views

“May” & “Might”: What's the right context?

I may not be coming in tomorrow... I might not be coming in tomorrow... When could I use "may" & "might"?