1
vote
2answers
59 views

Use of “contretemps”

According to Oxford Dictionaries, contretemps means "an unexpected and unfortunate occurrence". What is the plural of it, if it exists, and how do I use it in a sentence? Do I say "contretemps ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

definite article with plural hypotheses

Is it correct to write "scientests can test a hypotheses" even though hypotheses is a plural?
5
votes
1answer
220 views

Plurals + The + Prepositions

I'm pretty sure I have to use the in 'The people/citizens of this city speak a dialect' but when I try to use another preposition, instead of of, it doesn't seem right. I don't know why. Do I have to ...
3
votes
1answer
577 views

Lots of questions for a lot of clauses!

I am confused over the use of lots of vs lot of. I am phrasing a sentence having the following clause : [Article] [lot-of/lots-of] [noun singular/plural] [verb] ... As an example : A lot of ...
1
vote
1answer
944 views

Is “make no mistake” a mistake?

Is "make no mistake" proper grammar? Isn't "no" being used as a quantifier? Aren't quantified nouns supposed to be plural when the quantity is none? For example, I was taught to say, "one egg" and ...
5
votes
1answer
311 views

How do I refer to two things together that have different adjectives?

I want to express these two facts: there is a front view; and there is a side view. Which of the following are valid ways of referring to the two views together? a front and side view; a ...
2
votes
1answer
274 views

Why do we need an indefinite article in the sentence “The price is **an incredible 50,000 dollars**”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: ‘A[n] * [number] [plural]’ Construction Why do we need an indefinite article in the sentence "The price is an incredible 50,000 dollars"? "An" is singular, "dollars" is ...
-5
votes
1answer
358 views

The correct way to say something is hired on an hourly basis

Which of the following is correct? We hire our bicycle... by the hour. by hours. by an hour. for hours.
4
votes
3answers
910 views

Origin and usage of “a shambles”

"Shambles" is one of the few singular nouns in English that blatantly resembles a plural noun. What is the origin of "a shambles"? Why do we really need to prefix an "a" in front of "shambles"? Which ...
4
votes
2answers
169 views

“To market, to market, to buy a fresh pig” vs “To the markets” valid English?

Is the phrase "to market" as in "going to the markets" valid use of the English language? I can think of two examples in local Australian vernacular: The Nursery Rhyme: "To market, to market, to ...
36
votes
8answers
3k views

Why is there no plural indefinite article?

The takes either a singular or a plural subject. A/an only takes the singular. When we pluralize a noun preceded by an indefinite article, we simply drop the article (sometimes replacing it with ...
3
votes
2answers
207 views

“A dual nationality” vs. “dual nationalities”

Which one is correct? He has a dual nationality. He has dual nationality. He has dual nationalities.
6
votes
1answer
12k views

Rule on absence of the article “the” with plural nouns [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Definite article with plural nouns I recently reviewed (as I believe, rather thoroughly) the rules of using articles in English and I do not recall any rule on absence ...
7
votes
6answers
3k views

Why does English need an article before any noun?

In my native language, we can say: I have dog Because I don't want to say a dog (one dog, how many dogs) or the dog (that dog, the listener don't care which dog). p.s. after 3 years later, I ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Definite article with plural nouns

Are there cases where the definite article is used with a plural noun, or is it a rule that the definite article is never used with the plural of a word?