2
votes
2answers
124 views

standardisation of style; attributive nouns and Saxon genitives

In a recent thread, it was recommended that Academies' Trust be written as I just have done: Academies' Trust. Normal possessive apostrophe rules apply. If I accept this traditional style, I ...
1
vote
1answer
193 views

Attributive or Possessive noun

In the following is it better to use a possessive noun with an apostrophe or an attributive noun without an apostrophe? The following list details the assumptions that have been made in ...
11
votes
3answers
671 views

Where did the practice of using apostrophes for possessive nouns but not pronouns originate?

Where did the practice of using apostrophes for possessive nouns but not pronouns originate? For example, possessive nouns (both proper and common) are written with a apostrophe before the final s: ...
0
votes
1answer
209 views

What will be the possessive form of the word “Tipsy” used as a noun? [closed]

The Microsoft Word grammar check shows "Tipsy's" to be wrongly formed. I thought "Tipsy'" would do the job and it was shown as correct. However, it occurred to me that Tipsy does not end in a 'z' or ...
2
votes
2answers
8k views

Possessive plural of country? [closed]

Is it countries? Country's? I originally thought the latter but this would suggest a singular country?
8
votes
3answers
42k views

“Today's assumption” or “todays assumption” — which is valid grammar?

We (non native English-speakers) are writing a paper and are wondering if the following construct is valid English: Yesterday's assumption is no longer valid. Specifically the apostrophe after ...
1
vote
2answers
20k views

How do you show possession with the word “year” (“year's” vs.“years”)?

So, I develop for a company that does workplace-surveys. And one of our report-formats has just been translated into English. And with it a description on how to read the reports. This description ...