An analogy compares two subjects to focus on the similarities

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5
votes
5answers
975 views

“Taste” is to “flavor” as “touch” and “sight” are to what?

For the senses, we have: flavor for taste aroma/odor/scent for smell sound for hearing ____? for touch/feel ____? for sight/see So one tastes a flavor, smells an aroma, hears a sound, feels a(n) ...
43
votes
10answers
9k views

“Eat” is to “feed” as “drink” is to what?

I can say "I feed someone". Am I forced to say "I give someone a drink", or is there a single word for this (as in "I [verb] someone")? Unfortunately my thesaurus can't really help me.
34
votes
9answers
13k views

“Race” is to “racism” as “religion” is to what?

I've heard "racist" being used in a few cases to describe bigotry towards people of a certain religion. It's a bit annoying because it implies that all people of a religion are the same race, which is ...
44
votes
10answers
13k views

You quench your thirst. What do you do with your hunger?

What is the equivalent of "quench" when speaking of hunger? Is it appropriate to say you quenched your hunger?
31
votes
9answers
13k views

“Trainer” is to “trainee” as “mentor” is to what?

What do you call someone who is being mentored? Is it mentoree or mentee? Does the term student or pupil imply a context outside the business environment?
49
votes
10answers
14k views

“Man” is to “womanizer” as “woman” is to what?

What's the feminine version of womanizer?
30
votes
5answers
3k views

Winter — wintry; summer — summery; spring — ?; autumn — ?

wintry: characteristic of winter, esp. in feeling or looking very cold and bleak: "a wintry landscape". summery: belonging to or characteristic of or occurring in summer; "summery weather"; ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Normans vs. Saxons: cow = beef, sheep = mutton, chicken =?

The story goes that after the Norman invasion of England, the words in English for prepared foods took on their French equivalents. The Saxon serfs bred the cows, sheep, and swine, which when served ...
6
votes
3answers
318 views

Term meaning 'with written words'

In the same way that verbally means with spoken words, I'm looking for a term that means with written words. Is there such a word?
2
votes
8answers
2k views

“Visualized” equivalent adjective for audio

Are there such words as "audiolized" or "audibilized"? EDIT: Merriam-Webster has the word Audibilized indexed with no definition! What I was trying to achieve was to say that something is an ...
16
votes
6answers
1k views

“Anachronism” is to “time” as what is to “space”?

Is there a noun for something that is "out of place" in space, like an anachronism is "out of place" in time? E.g., an old-timey barber shop in a chic neighborhood.
13
votes
8answers
1k views

'Patriotism' is to 'Country' as _______ is to 'City'

The title's pretty self explanatory! I can't seem to find a word which means exactly this, but I would be amazed if it doesn't exist.
7
votes
4answers
2k views

Is there a word akin to “hungry” or “thirsty” that implies a need to urinate?

Sometimes my brain (maybe because I'm not a native English speaker) tends to come up with logical extensions to common formats; in this case, more than once I caught myself thinking (not out loud, ...
35
votes
7answers
3k views

“Left” and “right” are to “side” as “front” and “rear” are to what?

Is there an equivalent word to "side" when speaking of the front or rear of something (e.g. a car)? So, a mechanic might say: You damaged your wing-mirror? Ok, which side? ... or... You ...
29
votes
8answers
4k views

“Warm” is to “warmth” as “cool” is to what?

Is there a word for "coolness" that corresponds to warmth?
12
votes
5answers
2k views

How do you form the 'north' and 'south' versions of 'occident' and 'orient'?

How does one correctly form the "north" and "south" forms for which occident and orient are "west" and "east"? I found boreal and austral, but those look like adjectives and I'm after the nouns. ...
4
votes
1answer
482 views

Why king and queen rather than king and kingess?

Dukes have duchesses, counts countesses, princes princesses, mayors mayoresses, and even emperors empresses. Yet kings have queens rather than say, kingesses. Why is this so? If this was due to some ...
3
votes
5answers
935 views

What's the adjective form of “sauce” as “salty” is to “salt”?

Saucy has a totally different meaning. When I describe food having too much sauce, I would like to use an adjective, however salty is not really applicable here.
1
vote
3answers
1k views

“Endorse” vs. “condone”

What is the difference in meaning/connotation between the two words? Is endorse "stronger", more positive? Also, endorse is to endorsement as condone is to what? Is there a noun counterpart?
-2
votes
6answers
254 views

A word that describes goofing off at work that can be used as an adjective in front of the word activity? [closed]

For example: The unreliable employee often engaged in __ activities like smoke breaks, smalltalk with his fellows, and playing Solitaire during work hours. On Friday afternoons, the employees ...
11
votes
4answers
343 views

Hire an employee (a consultant)?

I am trying to fill in this sentence: “My company is looking to ___ a consultant”. Is the correct term “hire” or is there a different word that is more fitting when talking about a consultant?
7
votes
8answers
5k views

What is an alternative (more positive) analogy to “beating a dead horse”?

I'm looking for an analogy for my repeated attempts to revive interest in a project. The phrase beating a dead horse almost fits the bill, but a dead horse refers to a subject that is no longer ...
6
votes
12answers
1k views

What would you call the object of an activity one does for fun?

For instance, the object related to cooking is a "dish", when playing it is "sport" or "game", when singing it's a "song". Which single term would describe the object for the general act of doing ...
5
votes
7answers
6k views

Female equivalent of “fellow”

If sistren is the female equivalent of brethren, what is the female equivalent of fellow? Words usually paired are: guy/gal; man/woman; boy/girl; lad/lass; brethren/sistren; fraternity/sorority; but ...
3
votes
3answers
520 views

“Employee” is to “employer” as “dependent” is to what? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: A depends on B, is A dependant, or is B dependant? I'm trying to find a word that is the counterpart to "dependent", i.e. refers to the one who the dependent relies ...
3
votes
2answers
685 views

Is this passage an example of a metaphor, analogy, or both?

"The movement of humanity, arising as it does from innumerable arbitrary human wills, is continuous. To understand the laws of this continuous movement is the aim of history. . . . Only ...
3
votes
5answers
809 views

What is the verb used to indicate that you have travelled from point A to B by motorboat?

Please consider the following and fill in the blank. This has driven me crazy ever since I moved to florida. How would somebody say the travel often by a boat without any sails. I drove from New ...
3
votes
1answer
222 views

Is “plantingly” an adverb?

Is plantingly an adverb form of plant? Can you give me a example sentence? Edit: This use of plantingly came from the following quote: Firstly I [would like] to thank you for taking the time from ...
2
votes
2answers
329 views

'Yet' is to 'already' as what is to 'eventually'? Could 'never' do?

I don't know if my title serves well in expressing what I am actually trying to ask, so maybe an example will do better: I have done it already. <-> I have not done it yet. I waited ...
2
votes
2answers
855 views

“Push” is to “pushable” as “enable”/“disable” are to what?

If you can push something you could say it is pushable. What do you say about something which you can enable and about something which you can disable?