This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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5answers
92 views

English- What are some other ways to say “make a difference”

I'm looking for other ways to phrase "I want to make a difference/impact" in a general and positive way. Something along the lines of making a change in the world or having a meaningful contribution ...
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3answers
132 views

Pronunciation Feedback Required

Did I pronounce the phrase "I'm gonna be gone for five weeks" correctly? https://clyp.it/oobrogbu Phonetically it looks like: [aɪm gɑnə bɪ gɔn fər faɪv wiks]. I have no idea which words should I ...
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3answers
250 views

If Americans go to the toilet in the bathroom, where do they take a bath?

As far as I am aware, in the US it is very common to refer to the room that contains the toilet (device for disposing of human waste) as the bathroom. If this is a separate room from the room that ...
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3answers
70 views

need confirmation or needs confirmation

I receive an issue reported in an issue tracker. That issue requires confirmation to check if it is a real issue. How should the label be names as: Need confirmation or Needs confirmation?
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2answers
379 views

“Sport” vs “Sports” Origin

I was recently reading this article on the use of "math" vs. "maths" as a collective noun (Americans use the former, Brits the latter). However, the trend seen in "math/maths" is reversed in ...
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2answers
109 views

Difference between 'voting' and 'casting a vote'

What's the difference between them? A man was talking to another person while the elections were being held. I overheard them. But I'm confused here. English is not my mother language and I have ...
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2answers
80 views

Proper use of “repertoire”

Could the word repertoire be used to describe one’s behavior as a façade?
3
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1answer
93 views

Is the split in pronunciation of “detail” regional, semantic, or irrelevant?

Or maybe just haphazard? Something else? When I want to refer to a small military unit put together to carry out a specific task, I'll call it a DEtail, accent on the first syllable. When I want to ...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

Where does the term “key-thong” (for flip-flops) come from?

In the east Bay Area of California, in the early '60's, we called flip flops key-thongs. (The spelling is likely wrong as I couldn't read at the time.) We moved to New Mexico in the late 60's, where ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Word stress in the phrase: I'll get it

I think the phrase: "I'll get it" can change its meaning based on which word is stressed. I'll get it to communicate I'm the one who will pick up the phone. I'll get it when someone insists and ...
0
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1answer
56 views

Possessive when both refer to a plural: “Hume's and Kant's moral systems” or “Hume and Kant's moral systems”?

Title says it all. What's the correct possessive to use when they both refer to the same noun? "Hume's and Kant's moral systems" or "Hume and Kant's moral systems"? Hume and Kant both have one moral ...
0
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1answer
68 views

a dataset of equivalent english phrases?

there is a similarity or even equality between many sentences in English language such as: I happened to come across the scientific definitions while reading. I came across the scientific ...
0
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1answer
308 views

Use of the word “definitive edition”

Can I use the phrase "definitive edition" to explain that a product has the most up-to-date and highest quality in the field as opposite to mean "last edition of the same series"? Thank you for your ...
-1
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1answer
49 views

The word foresaw and its morphemes

I need help with the word foresaw. I know that the morphemes for foresaw are {fore} and {saw} but what kind of morpehmes are they (derivational/inflection) and what are their category and function
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1answer
41 views

What does it mean “plays with data, words and music”?

One of my friend wrote on her profile, "plays with data, words and music." She is a data scientist. Is this also wordplay?
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1answer
659 views

Got started or started

I am a learner of the English language. I have written two sentences, please give your two minutes and let me know, which one is correct? In the following sentences an action was started by my dog, ...
-2
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1answer
86 views

Is there any difference between 'plaid' and 'tartan'?

It seems to me that some Americans will say plaid where we will use tartan. Whilst tartan refers to woollen cloth woven in one of several patterns of coloured checks and intersecting lines; plaid ...
1
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0answers
55 views

Origin of the phrases “out back” and “out front”?

I'm going through the Song of Ice and Fire books, and although it's mostly written in what appears to be British English, very occasionally Americanisms sneak in. One example that I just noticed is ...
1
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0answers
52 views

Sentence stress and word linking with the problematic Y?

the question: Can I use your bathroom? phonetically looks like: [kə_naɪ ˈyuz yər ˈbæθˌrum] I think the stress should be on the verb USE and the noun BATHROOM. Am I right? Some dictionaries show the ...
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0answers
51 views

already , southern pronunciation ≈ [ʰɑɾi] “oddy”

Cut to the chase pals Could anybody confirm the southern pronunciation of "already" as something like oddy ? if so, What's its phonetic transcription? is there any eye spelling for it? I've noticed ...
0
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0answers
7 views

Pronunciation of What do you want to do?

When I pronounce the question: "What do you want to do?", I hear some stress on the first syllable of "whaddya" and "wanna" and a bit stronger stress on "do". This is how I pronounce it: ...
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0answers
44 views

Are both “How did you” and “Howdja” used?

How did you get here? [ 'haʊ dɪdʒʊ 'gɛt hɪər? ] I took the bus. How did you get here? [ 'haʊdʒə 'gɛt hɪər? ] I took the train. My question: are both "haʊ dɪdʒʊ" and "haʊdʒə" used in American ...
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0answers
40 views

Stress in the question: How about you?

If I transcribe this question "How about you?" to IPA it looks like: [ haʊ əˈbaʊt yu]. The dictionary shows the word "about" with primary stress on its second syllable but I think in my question it ...
0
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0answers
31 views

Is it redundant to say “the plot of the story”?

I'm writing a paper about title cards and title sequences in movies and at one point I say These title cards were also used throughout silent films as they were essential to carrying the plot of ...
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0answers
31 views

Should I always use the -ised ending for UK english and the -ized for US?

Realized vs realised, randomized vs randomised etc. Is it true that the former is always correct in US and the latter in UK english? Is there a list of english-speaking nations that use the former or ...
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0answers
91 views

Sentence stress: I'm sort of busy right now

I heard this phrase in a TV show: "I'm sort of busy right now". You can listen it here (I cut out the phrase): https://clyp.it/4khla44l Phonetically it looks like: [ɑɪm soərt əv bɪzi raɪt naʊ]. The ...
0
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0answers
43 views

I need to find out how to say this word who've

I don't know how to say this word so I need to find out how to say so that I can do my home work I am in 4 grade and I am doing my selling homework and I need you to help me find out how to say this ...
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0answers
32 views

Referral Campaigns or Your Referral Schemes

I have a referral program which comprises of 50% UK users and 50% US users. Taking into account location, what would be the most appropriate title to use... Your Referral Campaigns Or Your ...
0
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0answers
81 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “slaved out”

As i was reading a character's biography : Jack, a small orphan child on transport ship that crashed on the Pitch Black planet. During the movie it is discovered that the child dresses like a ...