This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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0answers
14 views

What does “do” mean in “They really do exist”? [duplicate]

I was watching an animation last night then I heard a sentence which was strange for me. One of the characters sayed this sentence "They really do exist" He sayed it because he saw a creature ...
0
votes
2answers
112 views

Difficulty constructing a sentence that reflect the interview process and targets entry levels [closed]

English is not my first language, and I do struggle here and there. I would like to come up with a sentence that would reflect the followings: Reduce your technical interviews in half. That is for ...
3
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3answers
120 views

“Three pieces of email” alternately to “three emails” in AE?

Does American English allow the use of "email" as a mass noun, in such a way that it is not uncommon to hear any such of the following phrases from native speakers? I've still got a huge backload of ...
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1answer
59 views

Is “rare anomalies” correct to use? [closed]

Does it sound too redundant to use "Rare anomalies" in a sentence to describe a rare occurance?
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1answer
48 views

what is the meaning of “free egress”? [closed]

the following text has been extracted of Harper Lee's new novel. I was wondering the "free egress" means commute without pay toll or it means commute without trouble? Bus service was erratic and ...
0
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3answers
150 views

what are the meanings of these bolded phrases? [closed]

Jean Louise’s aunt often held up Cousin Joshua to her as a family example not lightly to be discountenanced: he was a splendid figure of a man, he was a poet, he was cut off in his prime, and Jean ...
2
votes
1answer
207 views

How to pronounce yin and yang?

How do you correctly pronounce yin and yang in American English? Especially the "yang" part because I hear it pronounced as it's spelled and also I think I've heard it like "yong". If you use IPA ...
-1
votes
1answer
108 views

what does it mean by 'you are onto a winner'? [closed]

Somebody explains a situation and told me that in that situation 'you are onto a winner'. what does it mean by 'you are onto a winner'?
3
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2answers
425 views

Can “must not” be used alternately to “can't” in AE to say that sth is logically impossible?

Does American English allow the use of "must not" instead of "can't" to say that something is believed to be logically impossible? Please consider the following examples: It must not be true! How ...
0
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0answers
27 views

“Came at [XYZ] life” origin?

What's the origin/etymology of "[ABC] came at [XYZ] life?" The definition according to Urban Dictionary is A phrase that is used in past tense to describe a situation in which another person ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

What's the word for multiple groups of criteria

What word would you use to refer to multiple groups of criteria? I'm building an application in which I'm performing several kinds of searches for specific records in a couple of tables. Each table ...
1
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1answer
79 views

Changing usage of past-perfect constructions in American and British usage

I notice a great many American speakers using the construction had loved as a preterite, that is, a simple past tense. I also hear the simple past tense used in instances in which I was taught to use ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

What do you call this profession in English

During any cattle market (afaik) there is a guy who makes note of who bought or sold what animals at what prices and who makes sure everybody sticks to the rules. The German word for this is ...
0
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1answer
131 views

How to indicate the number of persons that will be attending an event

I created a website for users to RSVP to a wedding. One of the questions they have to answer is to indicate how many persons will attend the wedding. What is the correct wording for a question like ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Is the verb “jimmy” related to “Jim Crow”?

The verb "jimmy" is more often used in American English than other dialects, and the main thing you "jimmy" is a crow bar. Is the verb "jimmy" derived from the American English phrase "Jim Crow", ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Understanding the sentence meaning [closed]

I am working on one project, where I have been offered this: Royalty of 15% on net revenue of the product. As a good will gesture, we will also pay you an advance against future royalties, ...
-2
votes
3answers
122 views

Term for a phrase that has an alternative meaning [closed]

Is there a term to describe the following types of phrases that have alternative meanings. "We were trying to boil the ocean" = we were trying to do too much "Eating the elephant one bite at a time" ...
0
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1answer
450 views

Is “little does he know” correct?

This expression is usually used in past tense ("little did he know") but can it also be used in present tense?
2
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2answers
124 views

Why do americans put “my” in front of everything?

I watch a lot of youtube, but I've also noticed this in movies. North americans tend to put the word "my" in front of stuff they tell you about e.g. "So I've got my grill fired up, I've got my oil ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Present participle - seeing [closed]

I red somewhere that "see" doesn't form present participle. Is it true? For exemple in sentence: I'm seeing my doctor today. We use -ing form. Can we call it present participle in sentence or ...
-1
votes
1answer
301 views

How to write a letter to request a new monitor?

I'm not good to write an letter to request a monitor for coding because currently I'm using old monitor which sized 17 inch thus I want to change to monitor screen 24 inch but I don't know how to ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

When is “Mains” or “grid” no longer the correct electrical term?

In a related question about the term for "mains" in the US (here), it was determined to be more often called a "grid" or "line-power". My question is: If in let's say a customized car, that uses 12v, ...
0
votes
1answer
343 views

True antonym to braggart/exhibitionist?

Braggart is a noun meaning someone who boasts about their achievements. Exhibitionist is also a noun meaning a person who acts in an extravagant way. Another example of a word in this synonym-family ...
41
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16answers
7k views

Is “act like a mensch” too localized for ELU readers (U.S. and/or British English)?

This question was motivated by an interesting comment that was made at http://academia.stackexchange.com/posts/comments/123681?noredirect=1 Part of Answer: I don't think that particular research ...
6
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2answers
1k views

Was “tickle (someone's) fancy” originally a double entendre?

Recently, I asked users to provide modern-day equivalents of idioms and expressions that contained the words fancy and tickle. The question is titled Whatever tickles their fancy in the US? I was ...
-1
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1answer
104 views

Use of 'z' versus 's' [duplicate]

I've been brought up believing that most of the words that have suffix with '-ize' or '-ized' is the American English form and the British English forms use (most of the time) '-ise' or '-ised' as the ...
2
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2answers
332 views

Whatever tickles their fancy in the US?

The delightful-sounding tickle your fancy is, I think, one of those rare idioms where the word order can be reversed and its meaning changes; the request: fancy a tickle? said with a raised eyebrow ...
5
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3answers
566 views

Colors = Crayons?

I always considered the word "colors" as synonymous with the word "crayons," e.g. "the teacher asked her students to take out their colors" would mean "the teacher asked her students to take out their ...
0
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2answers
117 views

How do we respond to tag question after urgings starting with 'Let's'?

There is a question bothering me. It is about an acceptable response to a tag question following Let's ... The following example is from English Club: A: "Let's go, shall we?" B: "________." ...
-1
votes
1answer
226 views

Is 'gotten' a proper/legitimate word? [duplicate]

According to what I was taught as school, the past tense of 'get' is 'got' and 'gotten' is "an American corruption and, therefore, is not a proper word". Example: "Should auld acquaintance be ...
1
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1answer
86 views

Are proper adverbs falling out of usage in current spoken American English?

While watching American movies and TV series, I notice that in dialogue very often the usage of a proper adverb is replaced by the corresponding adjective (in the case where the adverb is formed by ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

Is “Sleeveless vest” redundant?

I had always thought a vest implied a sleeveless garment of clothing, but I find several instances of the phrase "sleeveless vest." Isn't that redundant and is there any reputable, somewhat ...
2
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4answers
55 views

'Fine Results' is fine?

I'm currently working in a slogan and my outcome so far is something like Fine Results, Simple Methods However, by googling "fine results", the search results shows me that there is little to ...
0
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1answer
110 views

Words play - does it have a special name in English? How to do the same with 'security' word for example?

By looking at this picture: Or at the title of this album: You can see that the authors used there something which I call a word game. My question is, does doing so has an official name? How can ...
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votes
1answer
60 views

Determiners in English sentence vs. plurals, singulars and zero determiners. Is it ok to say? [duplicate]

Do I need any determiners in the sentence below in general statement? Strong winds destroy homes. Is it ok to say in English in specific situation? The strong wind destroyed the homes in North ...
2
votes
2answers
92 views

Pronunciation of word “considered”

I have learned in school that letter 'r' is not sounded in the word 'considered', here's an example. But I have been watching the 'How I met your mother' series, and Ted have pronounced that with ...
1
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1answer
56 views

“Enjoin” vs “Adjure”

"Enjoin" means to direct someone with emphasis and authority. "Adjure" means to command in a serious manner. Are the two words used in different contexts?
1
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1answer
58 views

Telling the time - Minute 01 to 09 [duplicate]

What would be the most frequent/common way of telling the time when the minute is between 01 and 09? Is there any difference between BE and AmE? 5:03 -> 1) five oh three 2) five three 3) three ...
27
votes
19answers
9k views

A verb that means “to prove someone is guilty of a crime”

Preface: I don't think there is a single-word (verb) that expresses the concept I am asking for, in which case I'd settle for the least ambiguous and most common phrase or idiom that describes the ...
0
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3answers
61 views

Interpreting contemporary literature [closed]

There's something I just don't get of English usage in contemporary literature. Take the following excerpt: I have only to break into the tightness of a strawberry, and I see summer-its dust and ...
2
votes
3answers
460 views

The phrase “more sharp” vs “sharper”

So I was talking to my fiancee and she said "more sharp" to which I said "you mean sharper?". This is in context of talking about her current earrings being "more sharp" then her usual ones. She then ...
1
vote
4answers
547 views

“I usually knock off at 6”

"I usually knock off at 6", i heard an english gentleman say that. Does it sound odd only to me? In fact, what I heard was "I usually masturbate at 6" Did some research: found a book (i'm guessing ...
0
votes
5answers
131 views

What does it mean when the beginning of a sentence is 'To Think' (followed by a comma)?

For example, "My name rolled out of his tongue like it laced the abhorrence of a deplorable word. He might consider using to it summon the devil. To think, I hated my last name." I don't understand ...
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0answers
206 views

What is the antonym to 'elevation'?

How do I say an opposite of "elevation of an object over the plane" which would mean "the level of the displacement of an object under the plane"? That is, I am looking for a word in "??? of an object ...
1
vote
2answers
83 views

Combining two sentences for title

I want to combine the following sentence: Relationship between son and mother, and relationship between daughter and mother Into one sentence for title of an article: Relationship between son, ...
9
votes
1answer
352 views

Influence of Spanish and usage of Spanish words in US English

A recent report by Instituto Cervantes ["El Español una lengua viva, informe 2015"] lists the US as the 4th country in the world with the highest number of native Spanish speakers (41.343.921), ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Hyphenation of a word to a two-word phrase [closed]

How should one treat the hyphenation of a word to a two-word phrase, such as in the example below: something about the qubit-resonator mode frequency detuning. The sentence tries to express: ...
3
votes
1answer
164 views

“Accessory” pronounced with a stress on the first syllable

I'm a first language English speaker, but grew up Bilingual in Spanish in a Spanish speaking country. Today I was speaking to another first language English speaker (Canadian) and used the word ...
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0answers
57 views

Exceptions to the rule that AAVE can omit “is” and “are” iff the corresponding form in standard English can be contracted?

According to Wikipedia: Only the forms is and are (of which the latter is anyway often replaced by is) can be omitted; am, was, and were are not deleted. These forms cannot be omitted when ...
4
votes
3answers
480 views

How to use the word “finna” correctly?

I've heard both "I'm finna go to the store" and "He finna go to the store." Do we prefer with "is, am, are", or without? Is it a regional / dialectic difference, or are they interchangeable?