This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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0
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0answers
149 views

“Order something done” for “Order something to be done” [duplicate]

As far as your variety of English goes, can the verbal turn "order something done" be used interchangeably with "order something to be done"? "We ordered this item sent to our local store." ...
-3
votes
1answer
79 views

“Absolutely” and “definitely” in AE and BE

Is "absolutely" as used colloquially in "You're absolutely wrong/right!" or "Absolutely!" more typical to AE than BE? Parallelwise, is "definitely" the preferred term in BE to express such ...
-1
votes
1answer
88 views

Verbal constructions with “on” in colloquial AE

Are verbal constructions with "on" somewhat more typical of AE than BE? e.g. beat (up) on someone, miss out on something, pass up on something, check (up) on something, catch up on something, ...
-1
votes
1answer
113 views

Verbal constructions with “with” more common in AE than in BE

Is it correct, and safe to say, that -- generally speaking -- verbal constructions with "with' are to a certain extent more widely and commonly used in AE than in BE and other varieties of English ? ...
-2
votes
1answer
69 views

“…Enough that one can do” for “…enough to do” in AE [closed]

In AE, can the phrasal turn "...enough that one can do" be used interchangeablyn with "...enough to do" in just about every which context? Sam is spiritually strong enough that he can stand with ...
-3
votes
1answer
77 views

“Show someone through” for “show someone around” in AE [closed]

Just wondering, can "show through" be used interchangeably with "show around" in AE? "Trained docents will be delighted to show you through the house." http://www.hewhs.com/museum/
0
votes
2answers
63 views

“Come through with” for “come up with” in AE

Does come through with sound like a perfectly acceptable idiomatic alternative to come up with? "He came through with an answer, not immediately, that made so much sense." – source
2
votes
3answers
108 views

How do Americans pronounce the word 'progression'?

In British English, we pronounce the word 'progress' as pro—gress. Whereas in American English it's pronounced as prog—ress. So how would Americans pronounce the word 'progression'? It ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Which is correct: “I’m done” or “I have finished”?

Which of these alternatives is grammatically correct? I’m done. or I have finished Like I’m done sounds very American, but is it grammatically correct?
-1
votes
2answers
389 views

British and other English variants of 'write to me' - 'write me'' [duplicate]

In British English, the standard is 'write to me'. In American English the standard is 'write me'. Similar variants exist with 'out of the window' and 'out the window'. When did the dropping of ...
0
votes
1answer
229 views

What does it mean when someone writes “Feel free to message me?” [closed]

Whats the meaning of it? Thanks in advance.
2
votes
2answers
78 views

Should “Ms.” be used in a document meant to be translated?

The honorific 'Ms.' is very useful in US English, but I can't find any authority on what the equivalent might be in other cultures and languages. Has this reached (say) Indian English? If I use it in ...
0
votes
3answers
84 views

What does “tearing your résumé apart in a way” mean?

I asked a résumé checker to check my résumé and she gave me the following answer: When you look at the below list of issues, you'll probably think I'm tearing your resume apart. I guess I am, in a ...
1
vote
1answer
303 views

Is American English more archaic or more modern than British English?

I insist that someone do something. (used more in American English, says Michael Swan's Practical English Use , for instance) versus I insist that someone should do somehting. (used more ...
0
votes
3answers
167 views

Is British English Outdated in Technical Writing?

I learnt English as my second language right from my school level and for the British colonial history of my country, my education was mostly in British English. In fact, during my school years, ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Variant pronunciation of “obesity”

A question mainly for Americans: Could you please confirm if some Americans indeed pronounce the "e" of "obesity" as the "ea" of "steady" rather than the "ee" of "bee" (o-be-si-ty instead of ...
3
votes
3answers
148 views

The word “geriatric”

Would you say describing somebody as "geriatric" is offensive? I think it's neutral in American English, but the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary describes it as "informal" and "offensive".
0
votes
1answer
149 views

Correct English Grammar [closed]

Based on this message: I hope you consider my application has awaken your interest and I am looking forward for a meeting with you to explain deeply of myself. The message is used in the end ...
1
vote
2answers
185 views

Where is the word “cutlery” in common usage

During a trip to the US I realised that many Americans have never heard the word cutlery before ... however some have. Where in the English speaking world (and in particular where in the US) is this ...
0
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0answers
32 views

What does “this industry blows” mean? [duplicate]

I am not a native English speaker and wondering what it means if somebody says 'this industry blows'.
0
votes
1answer
75 views

What do these two sentences mean in Time's Sports?

Manning has enraptured the rapidly growing ranks of the formerly young in places far beyond the valley of the South Platte River. I hardly understand what this sentence means in this context; ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What's the difference between “content” and “contented”?

What's the difference between "content" and "contented"? I feel content with my present condition. I feel contented with my present condition. When she calls me by my name sweetly, I ...
1
vote
2answers
94 views

“On the air” OR “On air”

Do you remember Northern Exposure? I hope so. Chris had a light-sign in his office: http://nevergoodbye.com/go/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/totalchris.gif And when you search google images for "on the ...
31
votes
7answers
2k views

Why do Americans go 'downtown' whilst people in the UK go 'up town'?

People in London, who live in the suburbs, may tell you they work 'up town', meaning in the City or the West End. In other large cities in Britain, Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds etc., I think people ...
2
votes
5answers
441 views

How do students respond to the “roll call” and how do you pronounce it?

I have two questions. In the UK, to do (or is it read?) a roll call is commonly referred to as "calling out the register". It's been so long since I was a child that I'm not absolutely sure how ...
2
votes
3answers
206 views

Is “Missus” used as a word in American English?

In the book "Geisha", Liza Dalby writes the following about schools for wearing kimonos (for Japanese people): The text of one school calls for an elderly lady to wear her kimono "with dignity"; a ...
1
vote
1answer
138 views

Can or should you use two ellipsis points in one large quote?

So if i were to quote an author and I want to add a later part to an earlier part by putting it in the middle of the first quote? an example : The researcher, led by Woo-Suk Hwang, insist they ...
8
votes
3answers
373 views

Are there any studies on changes in British English to become more like American English?

With the spread of American popular culture (movies, books, franchises, etc.) and technical jargon (manuals, Web syntaxes, default spell-check settings, etc.), I'm wondering if there have been any ...
0
votes
2answers
68 views

How to call to this profession in English?

What do you call this profession in English - a man who creates layouts for web sites in css and html? This is a very important question. Because in the Russian-speaking community still no one can ...
1
vote
1answer
469 views

What does “cynical confidence” mean?

I know that cynical means something along the lines of believing the worst in people, but how does this word coincide with confidence? For instance, what would this line mean? The witness had a ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Which term is more appropriate: Rate plan, Pricing plan or Tariff plan?

We are the provider of certain (on-line) services and we have different pricing for different user categories, depending on their volume of operations. Currently we use "tariff plan" as a term for ...
2
votes
1answer
185 views

Why is this idiom negative, as opposed to positive?

Why is the idiom drop the other shoe negative as opposed to neutral or positive? I was looking something up when I came across this: to do the deed that completes something; to do the expected ...
3
votes
1answer
323 views

What is the IPA for “trade”?

Some of my students have a disagreement about transcribing the pronunciation of "trade" in American English. Some say it's (a) [t͡ʃeɪd] while others (and they point to dictionaries that support them) ...
2
votes
1answer
110 views

Why use 'I are' 'You is'?

I've seen many American and English people writing their sentences like this: I are... You is... While the way I've learned it, and seen most widely used is like this: I am You are ...
7
votes
3answers
151 views

What is the earliest mention of an “American accent”?

Do we have any idea how quickly the American colonists (specifically those British colonists living in what would later become the United States, but I'd be curious about French and Spanish colonists ...
-1
votes
1answer
133 views

Got started or started

I am a learner of the English language. I have written two sentences, please give your two minutes and let me know, which one is correct? In the below sentences an action was started by my dog, for an ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

Punctuation in my sentences [duplicate]

I am a learner of the English language and especially I am learning the punctuation marks in the English language. I have written two sentences. Please give your two minutes and let me know, which ...
1
vote
7answers
270 views

Appropriate word for smile

I'm looking for an appropriate word for a certain kind of a smile. Are you in love with that girl' asked she with a grin on her face. I have used the word grin but I guess grin is a broad ...
2
votes
1answer
124 views

When is “all y'allses” used?

I have a student from Virginia who says she has heard the use of all y'allses; does anyone know about this? Is it that the second person plural being used is all y'alls (with the -s at the end here ...
4
votes
2answers
405 views

“Ma'am” or “Miss” in American English?

Is it common to address a female sales clerk as Miss in the US? What about ma'am? If neither is proper, what would you suggest?
0
votes
2answers
237 views

Grammar check on a sentence with one subject, many verbs in sequence, and no conjunctions between them

Here is a sentence from my article. Just wondering if there is anything wrong with having sentences which are too long. He created some data, put up some samples, initiated a sequence and finally, ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

What does off of oil mean? [closed]

I am reading a book and I came across the sentence below. I am not getting the meaning out of the line. Please guide me. Thanks. I decided that the most important thing to do was to figure out how ...
-4
votes
1answer
69 views

What's the meaning of following sentence [closed]

I got this sentence from a book, but i don't understand it: Orgasm gets the lion's share of her attention.
2
votes
3answers
238 views

Is the 'th' sound usually reduced in spoken English?

I am working on my accent and pronunciation. I use American Accent Training and it says that in spoken English, speakers usually run words together. For example, "Run them all together" turns into ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Difference between “take a taxi” and “get a taxi”

Which of the following is correct? If both are correct, do they have different meanings or usage? Take a taxi/bus/train OR Get a taxi/bus/train
8
votes
1answer
335 views

American refusal of the IPA: why?

Are there any historical or political reasons for the rather consistent refusal of the International Phonetic Alphabet on the part of American academics? Did Mark Twain's ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

Need a quick translation [closed]

What is the meaning of this sentence: What is the Need you are going after? **Edit** here is the context 1) PowerPoint presentation Intro (4 – 5 slides) a) What is the Need ...
4
votes
2answers
522 views

'-gate' as a suffix to coin words related to scandals and corruption cases

I noticed that for corrruption/scandals the usage of '-gate' suffix is pretty common, as we have recently seen with 'datagate' and before with 'watergate' Can anyone explain what the relation between ...
-2
votes
4answers
101 views

What is my co-worker asking? [closed]

My American co-worker sent this to our group chat: Can an undatable man be transformed into a datable man? I am not asking if you think such a thing can be done in real life. I am asking ...
2
votes
1answer
858 views

Is the idiom 'keeping well' recognized only in British English?

I've seen the idiom 'keeping well' being used to mean 'in good health' in some contexts where British English is expected. But Americans seem surprised by it. Is that idiom uncommon in American ...