This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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1
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1answer
59 views

AmE Phonetics: < I don't n-> /aʊn/ [closed]

Cut to the chase: While listening to the record 2.0 Boys by Slaughterhouse I've noticed that Joell Ortiz and Joe Budden pronounce such sequence of sounds — namely "I don't know" around 1:55 and ...
1
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3answers
88 views

I need a word encompassing the meaning of free from something

Suppose I have a work to accomplish today, but I am not in the mood to finish it. I need the word to comprehend all these ideas. The sentence to be put in would be like "Request to free me from the ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Etymology & Colloquialism

I'm writing an essay for college applications in which I have to create a class. My idea is a class about the origin, change, and regional dialects of the English language. As an example, one would ...
0
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3answers
185 views

Use of as good and as well

Are these two sentences correct? This is as good as ... This works as well as ... Edit: This one is as good as the other one. This one works as well as the other one.
0
votes
3answers
863 views

“There is a lot of food and fruit” vs. “there are a lot of food and fruit” [duplicate]

Which of the following sentences is correct: There is a lot of food and fruit in the supermarket. There are a lot of food and fruit in the supermarket.
0
votes
2answers
108 views

Can I use Partty (with double “t”) instead of Party? [closed]

I am looking for a domain name that ends with Party. However, those names I am looking are already taken. So if I use, lets say , www.WePartty.com (with double 't') instead of www.WeParty.com , would ...
4
votes
3answers
548 views

Why do 'fine words butter no parsnips'?

I was at a dinner last night where some rather nice herb butter was served with the vegetables. Conversation close to me then turned to the English expression 'Fine words butter no parsnips'. It ...
17
votes
6answers
1k views

American 'cup' measurement — for cheese

One recipe states "one cup of cheese, shredded". Now, does this mean you need a "cup" of cheese (i.e. 8oz.) and then grate it (I am English), or do you grate it first and then measure your "cup" of ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

prepare food or prepare dishes in AE

Question for American English - is it more usual to use "prepare food" or to use "prepare meals" or "prepare dishes" The whole sentence is: We prepare delicious dishes (food, meals) with special care ...
-2
votes
2answers
40 views

Pls help me modify this sentence [closed]

So he had to end his football career in getting a neck injury during match in 2007
0
votes
1answer
210 views

How can I explain a word used in a previous sentence?

I am defining a "thing" with an adjective. Example: X is a small y. Then I want to give a clean and simple explanation for the adjective small --because it can mean several things and I want to ...
1
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0answers
36 views

Usage of “The” before a nation name [duplicate]

If USA is referred as "The USA" , why not "The India" ??
2
votes
1answer
155 views

Is “teen-ager” correct? Still used? Etymology?

I was reading an article in The New York Times published in 1990 and came across the spelling of teenager as 'teen-ager'; is this American spelling? Archaic? The young man, who often said he only ...
3
votes
1answer
467 views

American English equivalent of “revise” (as in studying)

Today, I discovered that the meaning of revise to do with studying is used in British, Australian and New Zealand English, rather than American English: (UK, Australia, New Zealand) To look over ...
0
votes
2answers
274 views

What is correct “Blazing Fast Speed” or “Blazingly Fast Speed”?

Which is correct? "Blazing Fast Speed" or "Blazingly Fast Speed"? In my opinion, the latter because one can't say, for one, "Amazing Fast Speed", right? Admittedly NY Times use it a lot but...: NY ...
0
votes
2answers
92 views

Who uses the term 'freehold'?

I am interested to discover in which countries, where English is used, the term 'freehold' and 'freeholder' is in everyday use. I know the question of 'freehold' has come up on this site before in ...
8
votes
5answers
865 views

Why is it a good idea to avoid 'like' in English?

In the video JULIA BOORSTIN -- Interview a Broadcaster! -- American English (0:34 to 1:20), a reporter from an American news television channel mentions that it's not a good idea to use the word ...
0
votes
1answer
126 views

Different ways of saying Aluminium [closed]

this is a very short question but me and a couple of friends have been discussing this for a little. Does anyone know why Americans and British people especially insists on saying "Aloominum" and ...
-1
votes
1answer
372 views

Is there a rule for how to pronounce words such as “dance”, “prance”, “castle”?

Is there a grammatical rule for the pronunciation of words such as dance, castle and prance? I believe the British English pronunciation is "ah", while in American English it is a short "a" sound.
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votes
2answers
173 views

Plural or Singular after “no” [closed]

After searching product on website, should I show one of these? There is no any product or There is no any products ? Some people on Internet said that singular is used after uncountable noun ...
2
votes
1answer
144 views

Proper usage of the word “racism”?

It seems that historical definitions of the word "racism" use it to mean something similar to "racial prejudice" and "racial discrimination", without any reference to which race has power or doesn't ...
1
vote
1answer
169 views

Does the American English hesitation sound “uh” imply ignorance, like “d’uh”?

In British English, a pause in speech is usually marked by the word “er” or “erm” and means something like “let me think”, or “what’s the word”. There is no implication of anything other than ...
1
vote
3answers
324 views

What does “no longer cease to exist” means?

I understand what "cease to exist" means, but "something" no longer cease to exist doesn't make sense to me. English is not my first language(obviosly).
2
votes
2answers
128 views

“Thanks for the write-up!!” in American English [closed]

Just confused about something. If person A asks for some suggestions to person B, C and D via email. Now one of three persons say C respond over the email with very detailed reply having some ...
2
votes
3answers
309 views

An American English idiom for “die of happiness”

Is there an American English idiom for Russian "die of/from happiness"? I thought I would die of happiness when I heard this wonderful song!
3
votes
2answers
137 views

“Now that x, y,” vs. “Now x, y” (“Now” in dependent clauses): British vs. American English

I have noticed that British English speakers tend not to use that after now in certain dependent clauses where American English speakers will almost certainly use it. BE version of two examples: ...
1
vote
0answers
215 views

What's the grammatical structure for “there is nothing a guy can do that even comes close”?

I got a sentence when watching a dialogue: There is nothing a guy can do that even comes close. In my opinion, "nothing" has an attributive clause: "a guy can do"; and in this atributive clause, ...
2
votes
1answer
168 views

How do you eat your eggs?

When I was in America I was offered eggs for breakfast as either 'up', 'down', 'easy' or 'dropped'. None of them are in use in Britain, where we have our eggs, fried, scrambled, boiled, or poached. ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

Corner Gas sitcom episode I, witness [closed]

In the Canadian sitcom Corner Gas episode 7, season 4 "I, witness", the dialogue among Brent, Wanda, and Oscar about Lacey know it all. Wanda said something "She is xxx know it all". xxx sounded ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Helping with a book?

I have been reading a book about programming and i came across a sentence which says: but if you don’t reuse some of what you’re doing, you’ll eventually wear your fingers down to painful ...
2
votes
4answers
170 views

A comical/informal synonym for “big”/“large” but not inappropriate

I'm looking for a comical word that has a meaning like big, humongous, etc. but nothing inappropriate that would contain swear words. For example, I could say: Whoa! That's a ______ spider! Slangs ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Only a something away from completing something

Is this statement grammatically correct: Only an Xbox One away from completing my Microsoft family. I have a Microsoft Phone (Lumia 920), PC (Dell) and tablet (Surface Pro) and I just need a ...
1
vote
2answers
140 views

sanity of a plastic glass! [closed]

I recently microwaved a plastic glass to get rid of micro-organisms on it. I accidentally dropped the glass after taking it out. I said "Damn it! This glass is not sane anymore!" Am I right in saying ...
2
votes
3answers
149 views

Give it me! Write me! [duplicate]

Our young grandson, who is a Mancunian, says 'give it me', and 'give it me back', which is a northern British standard. It made me think that it is not only northerners who omit the indirect object ...
0
votes
2answers
259 views

Single word for “Where are you guys?”

What slang expressions can I use to express "Where are you guys?" in a single word? I am looking for a very short, informal phrase or a single word I could use to ask this question that would still be ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Plural for “photo”?

What's the proper plural for "photo" - "photos", "photoes", or it is generally desired to rephrase the whole thing and stick with "photographs", "images", "shots", "pictures", etc? As for usage ...
-2
votes
4answers
100 views

What word suits best: Who are my friends or Who my friends are? [closed]

I'm very confused with these words. Which is best applied in my project? Please help me with this problem because I need to submit my project tomorrow.
0
votes
2answers
149 views

can two conj.(but and because ) be used together?

I confused with this sentence : "The Emplyee class is a superclass, but not because it is superior to its subclass" I know both "but" and "because" can be conj. for connecting two sentences. But here ...
0
votes
2answers
124 views

Does “supposedly” have a negative connotation?

Put another way, would using "supposedly" in the following sentence upset a neutral tone? A variant of qi gong is external qi gong, wherein a qi gong master supposedly directs the flow of qi ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Bad Words in America [closed]

Why are cuss words bad? Like, they are just like any other word. And how come when people get mad, cussing helps them feel better?
1
vote
1answer
225 views

Introducing yourself to someone you have never met [closed]

Today, my manager introduced me to an employee who's visiting us from a different geographical location. The person is visiting our office for 2 weeks. I don't know anything about him and I don't have ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the best way to get rid of international accents?

I have lived in the United States for more than five years now, and I am over 20 years old. Although I do not have that many problems with my verbal or written skills, it is not hard for people to ...
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

“Happen to know” vs. “came to know” vs. “got to know” vs. “came across”

Can anyone give use cases and examples for Happen to know Came to know Got to know Came across I always gets confused in their uses.
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2answers
786 views

What's the difference between “ex-” and “former” [closed]

Is there any real difference in usage between ex- and former?
0
votes
2answers
4k views

Is it awkward to start an email with “I am [my name]. I am writing to ask you…”?

I saw a job announcement (faculty position), which usually says "questions regarding this position should be addressed to [name and email.]. I want to ask a few questions about the position, and ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

Usage of “you is”

So I'm reading a book set in the American South in the beginning of the 1900 and I stumble upon the use of the verb is with you ("you is", "is you?") in conversations: eg. "is you Samson Fuller?". ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

What is the word for “history of the study of the subject”?

Suppose the subject is nutrition. Is there a word for the history of the study of nutrition? Or the history of the study of a science for that matter? I thought it was one of those epi-ology words ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

When should a syllable be stressed? [duplicate]

In English, when is it proper to stress a syllable? Do you just say whatever feels right, or is there a certain way you can know when to stress a syllable?
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Battery is flat

I was born and raised in some anglophone Asian country where people use the word "flat" to describe a battery when no electrical current can be generated by it. Some would even use the word "flat" to ...
7
votes
5answers
936 views

Is “stationery” the name of the store that sells pens, pencils, paper, school things, etc.?

In Brazil we call this store by the generic name of papelaria, something like "paper store". What is the correct name for this? Is "Stationery" the name in any country that speaks English? I read ...