This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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3
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1answer
51 views

Why we need two uppercase in last name McKay? Why not Mckay? [duplicate]

Convention? Any historical reasons? This seems to be a little odd for me. I'm not a native English user. I thought only the first letter should be the upper case. What's so special about this last ...
1
vote
2answers
74 views

Does the [ɒ] in “not” sound different from the [ɒ] in “hot”?

I would like to know why the [ɒ] in not often sounds different (more rounded) than the [ɒ] in hot, father, or car in American English. I know that in British English the vowel in not is an [ɔ], but ...
1
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2answers
85 views

Questions about some American English vocabulary [closed]

I was wondering if any American writers could give me some advice as to whether the following expressions/vocab are used and understood in the US: (words in bold are the ones I'm asking about. Some ...
3
votes
2answers
204 views

Plastic silverware - What's that? (American English)

I was surprised to discover that what we Brits call cutlery is called silverware in the U.S. To me the term 'silverware' refers to items that are made of pure silver or, at the very least, are ...
3
votes
1answer
93 views

Pronunciation of words that end with two syllabic R's

There are a few words in English that end with two adjacent syllabic R's (in theory). For example, let's take the word deliverer. As a non-native speaker, I find it very hard to pronounce those two ...
0
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0answers
34 views

What is the rule for pronouncing the “a”? [duplicate]

While British people mostly seem to speak a hard "a", American people tend to make an "ae" in some cases. Here are some examples of what I mean, grouped by pattern: glass/grass ...
1
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3answers
46 views

What is the word for showing affection for a certain team just for the sake of it?

I like a football team or show support for them purely because when I was being raised, everyone around me used to like that team. So I like them but its not like I care if they win or lose. Is there ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

What verb form should be used in 'that' clauses after words expressing personal reactions and judgments? Subjunctive or modal?

In British English it's probably most natural to use should: It's surprising that he should say that to you. I'm sorry you should forget my birthday. But I'm not sure about the American way ...
1
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0answers
28 views

What do we got? [duplicate]

What do we got? In vernacular American speech, I have heard this structure several times. A search in COCA yields 36 results for "what do we got" and 107 results for "what do you got". This is what ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

democratizing recruiting or democratizing recruitment?

I am trying to decide which slogan to go for? democratizing recruiting or democratizing recruitment? Which one makes more sense both grammatically, and logically. My subtitle is the ...
16
votes
8answers
3k views

Why do we 'cut' a deal?

I hired a private detective to see if I could cut a deal In the above sentence, why do we cut a deal? Should I replace it with make a deal? Is it a popular idiom in the native English world?
3
votes
3answers
313 views

quite pretty, rather pretty, very pretty in British English and American English

I have a feeling that "quite pretty" doesn't have exactly the same meaning in British English and American English. For instance, in American English, "She's quite pretty" is considered as a ...
0
votes
3answers
245 views

What's the “butter zone”?

An episode of Mythbusters about a steam machine gun and beating polygraph tests referred to the "butter zone". What does the phrase mean? Onelook.com couldn't find a definition. Urban dictionary has ...
0
votes
2answers
20 views

“at once” ambiguous between simultanous and immediate

I have a statement that uses "at once". It is supposed to mean "in one sweep" but the longer I look at it, the more it sounds to me like "immediately". What would you suggest? Keep it or change it? ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Should this be a restrictive or non-restrictive relative clause?

Which makes more sense in American English? The non-restrictive relative clause: The bed has a thickness, which may be adjustable. versus the restrictive relative clause: The bed has a ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

what is the meaning of “co-indexed” in English?

I know that English people use "co-" prefix to show something is "joint" or "jointly Verb" with something else . But I encountered a key sentence in a article and I cannot understand it well: "we ...
-1
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4answers
175 views

When did “I could care less” (rather than “I couldn't care less”) become popular?

What decade? Any particular reason? This is an etymological/historical question, not a grammar question.
3
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2answers
74 views

A word or term for driver /car taking no passengers

I need a term or a single word in traditional English or modern English which specifies "a car which has nothing but the driver & empty seats" Please help.
0
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0answers
66 views

Is it grammatical to use redundant past tense?

is it grammatically correct to use "have" or "has" before a past tense verb? for example, which is more correct: (1) "Some called for..." vs. (2) "Some have called for..." or similarly, (3) "Some ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

It is possible to reduce this relative clauses

I'm wondering if this sentence Optical fibres, which are made from very pure silica fibre, are the form of transmission line which is most often used these days. that the relative clause is ...
26
votes
12answers
5k views

Is there a word, phrase, or idiom for a person who stays too late at an event such as a dinner party?

Something like "latecomer" but for departing rather than arriving. For example, "Bob was always the _____ at social outings." Other variations with verbs or non - noun idioms are useful to me as ...
3
votes
2answers
234 views

“Quite” American vs British English

In looking at the answers for this question, Using "quite" with a noun, it occurred to me that "quite," although having a dictionary definition, might be used differently by AmE and BrE ...
0
votes
3answers
96 views

“Authorization” vs “Authorisation” - I'm in some real dilemma [closed]

I'm writing a professional business-related project summary, whereby half of the clientele is in the U.S while the other half of the same business is in the U.K. - and I don't want to disappoint ...
6
votes
5answers
745 views

How to express someone's height in metric

If someone is 169cm tall, what is the most common way of saying their height in metres and centimetres in American/Australian/British English? I'm not interested in converting metres (meters) and ...
3
votes
2answers
116 views

Aspiration in American English

I would like know which consonants are aspirated in American English and when? Also, when are they not aspirated?
0
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1answer
64 views

What does “don’t get us started on” mean?

The complete sentense is "On average, the more public member functions are, the harder it is to find bugs — and please don’t get us started on the complexities of debugging classes with public data." ...
0
votes
3answers
100 views

A word to mean escape from a dire situation involving death

When the Sobibór prisoners escaped they were in a dire situation. They could stay in the camp to face certain execution, or revolt. Risking revolt meant they might die, but there would be a slim ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Audio vs. Law [pronunciation]

I can hear a difference between the pronunciation of the /ɔ/ sound in words like "audio" and "law." In the former, the vowel in question sounds more like the /ä/ in "car" (other words containing this ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

How to say “influenza vaccine injection” in oral English?

Is there any word replace "influenza vaccine injection" in oral English?
0
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1answer
29 views

How to express this sentence in another way?

I have a sentence: The covariance across neighboring elements is not informative about the cognitive function under examination. I want to express this in another way. Please give me a help! Thanks! ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Is “hats-led society” grammatically correct and does it convey the right message?

It's a strange phrase indeed. It's from a foreign phrase. There's a period where a slogan "hats lead the society to become a superpower" was in effect. *Edit I think I should have given historical ...
3
votes
2answers
75 views

What is the correct adjective suffix form for tropism?

A tropism is a type of biological response where an organism reacts to a particular environmental stimulus. For instance, try searching for gravitropism or phototropism and you'll see what I mean. ...
6
votes
5answers
812 views

What do you call an area enclosed by apartment complex structures? Is it a courtyard?

Please take a look at the picture above. This is an inside area surrounded by apartment complex buildings. It contains parking space for the residents and a playground for kids. What would be the ...
0
votes
2answers
69 views

Is “Apprentice” mainly a European term?

Apprentices, sorta like trainees who are skilled but need a bit of training and experience before making the commitment to employ them. When I did a bit of research, I observe that "apprentices" were ...
1
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0answers
63 views

“He could do X for England”. Are there similar expressions in other parts of the English-speaking world to this derogatory sentence?

In Reginald Hill's Dalziel and Pascoe novels, I've read the phrase: "He could [do x] for England. It is always derogatory. It is a lovely phrase! Because I can't put my finger on a quote from these ...
0
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2answers
72 views

APA: Paper in past tense but is/was verb confusion for alive author

I want to state, "One advocate for the issues based teaching style is/was Brian Schultz." He is alive, but my paper is in past tense. What do I do?
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Manuals of Style and Typography for British and American English [closed]

I would like to know which manuals of style and typography are the most common ones for British and American English. I am interested in the basic manuals and the manuals for technical scientists ...
0
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2answers
28 views

Does “push the resolution to a very high level” sound natural?

Does the sentence below sound natural? The megapixel war in the camera industry has pushed the resolution of image sensor to a very high level. p.s. I write this sentence in an academic paper.
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Did I use “That is” correctly?

How would I go about using "That is" in the sentence(s) below? "Everyone in the town was poor. That is, except for one man." Should I use a hyphen/comma/semi-colon (or something else) in between ...
2
votes
1answer
146 views

“Who is this for?” vs “Who does this belong to?”

Yesterday I asked an Australian friend "Who is this for?" in reference to a wallet on his desk. He laughed and thought my sentence didn't make sense in the context of the situation. Instead, he ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Is the term “wellington boots” commonly used in America?

I cannot find anywhere if "wellington boots" is strictly British term or Americans also use it. Are they called "rubber boots," "wellington boots" or both in American English?
8
votes
2answers
692 views

Is the expression “one's cup of tea” used in American English?

OK, the Free Dictionary defines this as one's cup of tea: Something that is in accord with one's liking or taste. For example, Quiz shows are just my cup of tea, or Baseball is not her cup of tea. ...
1
vote
2answers
110 views

A word for the condition of being blasé

Is there a word in English that encapsulates the condition of being blasé, sort of in the same vein as "weariness" encapsulates the condition of being weary? blasé: having or showing a lack of ...
4
votes
4answers
151 views

Colloquially, does the term “redhead” apply specifically to a person with naturally red hair? [closed]

My husband and I were discussing this yesterday, and I was hoping y'all would give us an "official" answer. :) We both believe that for a person to be accurately described as a "redhead", they must ...
0
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0answers
32 views

which word gives emphasis to other word

If A-cum-B denotes that, A and B are similar standing Which word describes B has having greater significance than A? For example : Accounts cum Finance means - both accounts and finance are of ...
-1
votes
1answer
47 views

A better way to phrase “Launch beta test” [closed]

I have a call to action button titled "Launch beta test". However, I feel the wording is not proper. I want to express to people that the product is still in experimentational mode, but is a close ...
0
votes
1answer
101 views

“Hi animals” — a US expression?

today I got a meesage on facebook by a known guy to me, from US, and the message was like that Hi animals, what is the address to the place? So the question is, the Hi animals is it a kind of ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

Past Perfect and Past Simple in AmE

I've recently been told that Past Perfect and Past Simple tenses are interchangeable in AmE. I know that it is possible to use the Past Simple tense instead of the Present Perfect one in AmE but have ...
3
votes
1answer
203 views

Why the does 'tu' get pronounced 'tyu' in British English?

Despite being a native Brit, I've always found it an oddity that words like "tutor", "tube", "tumour", and "duty" are pronounced as "tyutor", "tyube", "tyumour", and "duty" in British English. For me, ...
4
votes
3answers
6k views

What is the correct usage of “throwing shade”?

The renowned scholarly institution UrbanDictionary defines the term as follows: throw shade: to talk trash about a friend or aquaintance, to publicly denounce or disrespect. When throwing shade ...