This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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0
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2answers
90 views

Is there a difference between a spigot and a faucet (usage in AmE) [duplicate]

What is a domestic tap called commonly in the US ? -a spigot? a device that controls the flow of liquid from a large container (MW) Dictionary meaning aside, I had this understanding that a ...
0
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0answers
30 views

is this correct; using lighted rather than lit? [duplicate]

Please help me clarify if this usage of the word "lighted" is correct in the following statement. "I have lighted the candle"
0
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0answers
39 views

Is it redundant to say “the plot of the story”?

I'm writing a paper about title cards and title sequences in movies and at one point I say These title cards were also used throughout silent films as they were essential to carrying the plot of ...
2
votes
2answers
77 views

'come rain, blood, or horse manure' American idiom?

Probably some of you, as I am, are familiar with the controversy that surrounded ABC miniseries Amerika (February 1987). ABC president response to that controversy was "we’re going to run that ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

English expression for “Dans la continuité de” in french [closed]

I would like to know how to say this french sentence "Ce projet ce situe dans la continuité d'un travail réalisé auparavant" in english. Is "This project follows on a work realized before" correct ? ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

“Financier” in British and American English

I am teaching English to a group of university students whose major is Finance, and whose native language is not English. I have no background in economics in general or finance in particular. I am ...
5
votes
5answers
170 views

“ain’t got the brains God gave a squirrel” - a (few) simpler alternative(s)

ain’t got the brains God gave a squirrel or ain’t got the sense God gave geese. I have taken a liking to this phrase, however, to my colleagues, most of who are from Latin America and SE-Asia, ...
3
votes
2answers
84 views

In which countries would “tags” be understood to mean “License plates and stickers that show the registration is currently valid”?

On our sister site a user recently used the term "tags" in relation to taxis in China. I thought it might man some kind of official authorization to operate a taxi. But upon clarification I was told ...
1
vote
1answer
129 views

Do words with primary and secondary stress lose the secondary stress in a sentence?

I read in a textbook that certain words in English lose the secondary stress when they appear in a sentence. For example, this female name has both primary and secondary stress according to the ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

what does the Flip Or Flop mean?

I just moved to the US and like a tv program on HGTV channel called Flip or Flop. I have no idea what this phrase means? Could somebody offer an explanation?
11
votes
5answers
4k views

Do Americans use the world 'turtle' as a generic word to mean 'tortoise'?

Obviously there are two different animals — a tortoise and a turtle. But I have been told by a colleague that in the US the word turtle is used to describe both. I find this odd as for example the ...
3
votes
3answers
797 views

Word Stress in the sentence “I put it on the table”

the sentence: "I put it on the table" phonetically looks like: [ aɪ pʊ_dɪ_dɑn ðə 'teɪ bəl ] and "I put it on the chair" phonetically looks like: [ aɪ pʊ_dɪ_dɑn ðə 'tʃɛər ] I think the strongest ...
1
vote
3answers
113 views

What to say if you don't want anything from a store?

I learned English as a second language. As I have never lived in any English speaking country, sometimes I don't know what to say in common daily situations. One good example of this occurred when I ...
17
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8answers
2k views

Why does American English pluralize certain singular nouns?

I keep hearing "A savings of $10" or that something is "a ways off". Sounds deeply weird to my British English ear.
10
votes
5answers
11k views

Understanding U.S. President capitalization

I was taught at an early age in the USA that when we write about our President, we are supposed to capitalize the title in order to signify that it's on the federal level. Is it correct to always do ...
-1
votes
1answer
65 views

“in God's name” usage in English [closed]

When people say "what in God's name are you doing?", I couldn't understand.
2
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2answers
59 views

Is “currently-installed” a proper compound adjective? [duplicate]

I'm in the process of working on technical documentation and the phrase "currently-installed" came up. The context of the orginal sentesnece is as follows: "You are not licensed to use the ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

I'm making sport live score application and I have a question [closed]

I'm making sport live score application and I have a question My application has many page for show live score and it has some page no any match playing. What sentences should i use ? No any match ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Did I stress the words correctly in this sentence? [closed]

I have this sentence: "Keep your voice down!" I'm not sure how native speakers pronounce it, but I would put a bit of stress on "Keep" and more stress on "voice" "2Keep your 1voice down!". I don't ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

In the 2011 film “bad teacher”, there is an exchange between several characters [closed]

Squirrel: I am so excited we're gonna be across-the-hall mates. But I'm so sad… it's because your relationship ended. Elizabeth: Who are you again? Squirrel: Amy Squirrel. Elizabeth: ...
17
votes
13answers
12k views

American vs. British English: meaning of “One hundred and fifty”

I've noticed that Americans do not say "and" when speaking numbers: for example, 150 would be pronounced "one hundred fifty". I and most other British-English speakers would pronounce it "one hundred ...
1
vote
2answers
72 views

A word for 'single view of information'

I have billing information coming from different sources and I want to provide a single view to all the billing information to users. Just wondering if there is a better single word for single view of ...
2
votes
2answers
92 views

Idiom: Get off your high horse (American English Stress)

Get off your high horse [gɛt̬ _ɔf jər ˌhɑɪ 'hoərs] We have a flap T linked with the word OFF. I'm not sure which words I should stress in the idiom above, apart from the noun "horse" which is the ...
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

If it was or if it were or if it is [duplicate]

My friend wrote a status like this Working on read-only environment makes you couldn't do anything. You can only get notice and warning. We are required to obey and submit to the circumstances ...
31
votes
14answers
10k views

Friendly way of saying “I love you”

In Spanish, Te amo (I love you) has more romantic feeling than saying Te quiero. The last one is used as a friendly way of saying I love you, but without romantic purposes. However, if translated to ...
0
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0answers
77 views

Should I always use the -ised ending for UK english and the -ized for US?

Realized vs realised, randomized vs randomised etc. Is it true that the former is always correct in US and the latter in UK english? Is there a list of english-speaking nations that use the former or ...
3
votes
3answers
426 views

Does “moonlighting” have a negative or neutral connotation?

We all agree that "moonlighting" denotes having a second job. However, Merriam-Webster and Oxford Advanced Learner's don't define it in exactly the same way. For example, Merriam-Webster attaches a ...
7
votes
8answers
17k views

Which is correct: “soda” or “pop”?

Depending on where you go in the world, some people will refer to a carbonated beverage as "soda" while others choose to use the term "pop." For example, "Can I get you a soda" vs. "Can I get you a ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

What's the difference between “licensing” and “licensure?”

On the new Engineering SE, we field questions about professional engineering registration. The tag categorizing these questions is "licensure" and I usually find myself referring to the topic by that ...
1
vote
0answers
93 views

Sentence stress and word linking with the problematic Y?

the question: Can I use your bathroom? phonetically looks like: [kə_naɪ ˈyuz yər ˈbæθˌrum] I think the stress should be on the verb USE and the noun BATHROOM. Am I right? Some dictionaries show the ...
15
votes
10answers
4k views

Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE

Idiom: in my neck of the woods (AmE) The meaning of this expression is: in the region where I live. I once tried to find out how a word that referred to a part of the body could later develop into ...
0
votes
1answer
93 views

what does “withhold no sacrifice” mean? [closed]

Reading Churchill's speech, I don't think I understand the following "withhold no sacrifice, grudge no toil, seek no sordid gain", what does this statement mean?
8
votes
9answers
3k views

What is “plaice” in the US? Would love a good fish and chips

When we went to the market, at the fisherman's counter we asked for plaice with which we would make fish and chips. Now here in the States when we ask for plaice, they don't understand what we mean. ...
3
votes
4answers
422 views

What is a 'farmer' in American English?

When Americans talk about farmers what do they mean? In Britain a 'farmer' is someone who either owns the land that he or she works, or is the tenant of the land. It is the person who decides what ...
1
vote
3answers
134 views

“I gotta go” or “I've gotta go” [closed]

While watching American TV series, I sometimes see a sentence, "I’ve gotta go," but sometimes an actor says “I gotta go” instead. Is there any difference between those things?
10
votes
4answers
694 views

“I park my car in the yard”

What is the origin of the different pronunciation of words like park, yard, cartoon, margarine in American and British English? In other words, why doesn’t British English generally pronounce the r ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Hurray vs Hooray? [duplicate]

I've seen two different spellings of this word - which is correct: hurray, or hooray? As in: You haven't got any outstanding alerts to action — hurray! I'm interested specifically in ...
2
votes
2answers
280 views

Why does “garage” have different pronunciations?

Whenever I'm teaching private students and we are faced with the word garage, I always hesitate a little. Italians have borrowed the term garage, which they pronounce /gaˈraʒ/. It stands for the ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Is “targetted” a standard British English spelling?

Wiktionary says that the difference between "targetting" and "targeting" is that the first one is a British spelling and the second one is American. Meanwhile, Oxford Dictionaries says that ...
2
votes
2answers
499 views

How widely used is the word “tush”

In my dialect of American English, the word "tush" or "tushy" is a dimminuitive of "rear end" (e.g., something you'd say about a baby, not as harsh as "butt" and a word you aren't ashamed to say to ...
0
votes
0answers
154 views

Sentence stress: I'm sort of busy right now

I heard this phrase in a TV show: "I'm sort of busy right now". You can listen it here (I cut out the phrase): https://clyp.it/4khla44l Phonetically it looks like: [ɑɪm soərt əv bɪzi raɪt naʊ]. The ...
0
votes
1answer
86 views

What does permeate mean in this sentence?

"I like girls who are just as confident without make-up on than when they are when it permeates their face." I saw it on Twitter. In this sentence, does permeate mean when makeup covers the whole ...
1
vote
1answer
143 views

Word Stress in a 3 syllable phrase

the phrase "Never mind" is three syllable [nɛv ər maɪnd]. The first and the last syllable gets stressed. Am I right? [2nɛv ər 1maɪnd]. I think that "mind" gets the most stress. I would like to know ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Difference between I'll be home 'by ten' and 'at ten' [duplicate]

I have a question. What does this phrase mean "I'll be home by ten", because it is confusing, especially when used with "at" instead of "by". When it comes to sentence stress which words should I ...
3
votes
1answer
70 views

The move from towards toward toward?

On this page, it is claimed that the usage of "towards" was dominant (I guess both in Britain and America) compared to "toward" until the 19th century when Americans moved toward toward. (Edit: an ...
3
votes
3answers
210 views

What is the origin of “pre-plan”?

Although I searched fairly extensively, I couldn't find any references as to the origins of pre-plan. According to Online Etymology Dictionary, pre-arranged and prearranged have existed since 1792 ...
1
vote
3answers
16k views

“Do you have” vs “Have you got”

I am studying English and I want to know the main difference between “Have you got?” and “Do you have?” questions. Are they the same? Is one more formal than the other?
3
votes
3answers
13k views

“If I go..” vs. “If I will go..” referring to the future [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Future tense in conditional clauses Which one is correct? option 1: If I go there, I can meet her or option 2: If I will go there, I can meet her I clearly ...
3
votes
2answers
137 views

Why do people finish speaking by saying “so”? [duplicate]

I often experience people who when they get to the end of what they were saying, they finish their sentence with the word "so" as if they are going to say something else, but they don't. Example: "I ...
0
votes
1answer
175 views

US English - need for determiners (a/an) in each item of a list (already parallel)

I have been all over every grammar site I can find (including this one) and cannot find a definitive answer. I am looking for a rule that says in a list of singular nouns, each noun must have its own ...