This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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0answers
10 views

“When will you be leaving”, Why? when the subject is Person! [duplicate]

My confusion about The correct sentence is when will you be leaving. but i don't know why they use "will be leaving" instead of "will leave"? Many thanks.
0
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1answer
52 views

I am having difficulty structuring the following sentence based on the following words

I want to ensure that the following words are conveyed in the sentence: Competency Cultural-fit Inclusion (inside of culture) My attempt has been the following, but I feel it could be ...
5
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2answers
110 views

“Turkey Day” 100 years ago

I've perceived an uptick in the use of "Turkey Day" to refer to Thanksgiving, and I ran a basic sanity Check against Google Ngrams. It seems to be on the rise since about 1970, but I also noticed a ...
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1answer
117 views

Is the idiom “as neat as a pin” an American phrase?

I'm editing a novel set in 1930s England, written by an American author, and have been editing out any Americanisms I come across. I just read a line of dialogue containing the idiom "as neat as a ...
3
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3answers
127 views

What does this phrase mean: “they just can't keep their hands off the cookie jar”?

What does the following sentence mean? They just can’t keep their hands off the cookie jar (or outta the cookie jar) I came across this sentence in a movie. The context is racism and the social ...
0
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1answer
50 views

A is B that is C, C refers to A or B?

He works in our company that is nice. In the above sentence, "nice" refers to company? or it can also refer to company? How about a general A is B that is C sentence?
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1answer
53 views

Rephrase the Sentence [closed]

I have a picture that I am trying to give a caption to. Following is what I have come up with, but it just not sounding right. It's picture of San Francisco downtown in the background and bay in the ...
0
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2answers
74 views

Is this grammatical? [closed]

Could you tell us what's your favorite Google Chrome extensions? , The ones that you are using regularly and the ones that are cool no matter how much you use it or how popular it is.
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2answers
75 views

Why is the past tense of text, as used by some people, pronounced “text-ted” and not just “tested”?

Why is the past tense of text, as used by some people, pronounced text-Ted and not just tested? One wouldn't say risk-ked for risked, or ask-ked for asked?
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1answer
44 views

What is the meaning of ground truth?

I am reading the paper : http://mi-lab.org/files/2014/10/FlexSense_web.pdf . I have problems understanding use of ground truth the following : Main Pipeline Reconstructing the full 3D surface ...
6
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1answer
210 views

“Carbine” rifle | is there pronunciation demographic data?

Let me count the ways: Car-bine (like: dine, refine, canine.) Car-bean (like: green bean, ravine, serpentine.) CAR-buhn (like: ..like the right and proper way to pronounce the scotch 'Oban'.) ...
0
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1answer
136 views

Earlier in the day meaning? [closed]

Today ,while reading news paper I came across the sentence "she had gone shopping earlier in the day " ....what does it mean ......? My conjecture "yesterday ?
0
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1answer
43 views

Out or out of which is it? [duplicate]

Which is correct 1 Get out the house. Or 2 Get out of the house? I've heard that the American English standard is the first one and the British English standard is the second one. Is that true? The ...
0
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1answer
61 views

How can I rewrite the sentence in professional way?

I have a sentence. Could you help me to rewrite it more professional way? Thanks The advantage of these methods is that guarantee to achieve a good optimal solution, and thus these methods are ...
0
votes
2answers
648 views

What is British biscuit called in America? Cookie?! Cracker?

You find in dictionaries (OED for example) that what the British call biscuit, is called cookie or cracker in America. But, British biscuits are like these: while American cookies are like ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

How should I capitalize “on which” using headline-style capitalization?

How should I capitalize on which in the headline The Construction of Those Terms on which the Parties Agree?
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5answers
81 views

How can I describe the intersection between a circle and a curve?

I have a curve C and a point x in the curve. At the point x, I draw a circle B with radius r and centered at point x. That circle B will cut/intersection (with) the curve C as red sub-curve line. I ...
0
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4answers
59 views

bigotry, with or without prejudice

Is prejudice required to be bigotry? big·ot·ry ˈbiɡətrē/ noun intolerance toward those who hold different opinions from oneself So, if you like having sex with little kids and in your ...
1
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1answer
123 views

I remember taking a lot of pictures for my wedding

This is Anna studying English by myself in Korea. I've faced some expressions written in one of my English learning books. Actually there is a controversial issue that most of people think these are ...
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1answer
66 views

American money specifics in writing a check

why can you write a check for twenty-nine hundred or thirty-one hundred but not one for thirty hundred? it seems strange that the numbers before and after are accepted but not thirty hundred must be ...
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2answers
43 views

Is “FOIL”, used as a verb, understandable outside New York State?

FOIA = Freedom of Information Act (federal U.S. law) FOIL = Freedom of Information Law (New York State) From this, I have frequently heard and read FOIL used as a verb, by journalists and ...
0
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1answer
87 views

A few questions about American-English vocabulary [closed]

There are a few terms I would like to use and am not sure if they are acceptable in American English. Any advice would be greatly appreciated! "the gormless expression on his face". My US English ...
-3
votes
2answers
78 views

How do i communicate this sentence clearly, and concisely? [closed]

I am trying to see if this sentence alone is grammatically correct and makes sense, or if i need to further elaborate with supplementary sentences in order to provide more clarity. All of the ...
-1
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1answer
44 views

What's the different between “kind of” and “sort of” in English [duplicate]

What's the different between "kind of" and "sort of" in American informal English?
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3answers
41 views

Is there a word to decsribe what appears to be social ignorance?

I am trying to come up with a way to describe a person that denies they have a problem due to the large number of people in society that follow the same beliefs. Very confusing.. stay with me here. ...
2
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0answers
36 views

Meaningless “Do” And the supposed relationship between English and the Celtic languages [duplicate]

The verb "do" often serves a meaningless purpose in questions. John McWhorter argues in his book "Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue" that this is a direct influence of the Celtic languages. In all of my ...
0
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1answer
44 views

I'm a Non-English man [closed]

Can anyone help me learn English properly? I'm a programmer from Bangladesh. I suffer a lot due to my bad English. Can anyone help me to start learning English?
4
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1answer
127 views

How do I ask a waitress to “wrap the rest of the food up” to bring home?

I went to a restaurant for a meal and didn't manage to finish it, so there was some food leftover. How do you politely ask a server/waiter/waitress to wrap the food up? And is the expression "wrap ...
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0answers
24 views

Watch what's happening or see what's happening?

Which one is correct? If neither, what should the verb be?
4
votes
1answer
98 views

The difference between “pressured” and “pressurised”

I often hear people talk of being pressurised into doing something, but I'm almost certain this is incorrect. A can of deodorant is pressurised, or a tin of beer, since in both cases the release of ...
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6answers
2k views

What is American English for “cross-party”?

I came across the word 'cross-party' while reading the newspaper. I didn't know this word so I looked it up in a dictionary. (Denoting interaction between two or more political parties). I noticed ...
6
votes
3answers
472 views

Is there an American English equivalent for the British “moggie” for a non-purebred cat?

I'm an American (and fond of cats). I'm familiar with the British term "moggie" for a non-purebred cat--basically the equivalent of "mutt" for a dog. I've never heard any American English equivalent ...
2
votes
3answers
110 views

Has the phrase “holiday season” been around for a long while?

In American English, has the phrase "holiday season", to refer to the Christmas season, been around for a long while? I assumed it was a recent politically correct invention to avoid mentioning the ...
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1answer
61 views

Grammaticality of “I was not alive”

I have been corrected twice in the sentence I was not alive, at that point in time. We were having a discussion involving life in the 1980s, and at some point I said I was not alive so I would ...
3
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1answer
95 views

Do Americans have their own unique way of referring to 'the summer'?

Across the world summer is a season of the year and we all talk about 'the summer' - do you have plans for the summer ? etc. But In America it is often taken to refer to the period of college ...
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votes
1answer
112 views

Why do some words exist in British English but not American English? [closed]

Thinking about the word "rubbish" which is widely used in the UK while non-existent in the USA, how do such words surface in Britain but not America? I read somewhere that American English is closer ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

T- and D-elision: I hateTHem OR I hated'em

I would appreciate your help with these two questions: 1) I hated them. Will the speaker omit the D or TH sound? Will he say: I hateD'em OR I hateTHem. Are both variatons ...
1
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1answer
91 views

Why do we say that our nose “runs”? [duplicate]

I find it odd that we say our "nose runs". Even stranger is that our feet "smell". Why is this?
0
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1answer
55 views

Question about “consistent”

I have a question about "consistent with". I want to write a sentence like Consistent with my previous experience, I am interested in pursuing research ~ blah blah. Here, I know that this ...
1
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1answer
42 views

Can the word “vector” be used in the context of non-infectious diseases?

According to one dictionary, vector (outside of physics, mathematics and computing) means "any agent that carries out and transmits a disease." Does this mean the word is limited to infectious ...
10
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3answers
240 views

“I have been Jessica” shouldn't it be “My name is Jessica”

We went to an electronics showroom, where we chatted with a sales girl. She explained some technical stuff about the things we were interested in. When she had finished explaining, she said "By ...
4
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3answers
2k views

What does “iron-ass” mean?

In New York Times’ (November 7) article under the title, “Poppy Bush finally gives junior a spanking,” Maureen Dowd introduced the following statement of Jon Meacham’s new biography, “Destiny and ...
0
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1answer
61 views

Why did the pronunciation of Orleans change in New Orleans, while those of French borrowed words were retained?

Words like rendezvous, faux pas, a la carte are still pronounced the same way as they are pronounced in the French language. Why was New Orleans an exception to this?
3
votes
1answer
51 views

Why we need two uppercase in last name McKay? Why not Mckay? [duplicate]

Convention? Any historical reasons? This seems to be a little odd for me. I'm not a native English user. I thought only the first letter should be the upper case. What's so special about this last ...
1
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2answers
74 views

Does the [ɒ] in “not” sound different from the [ɒ] in “hot”?

I would like to know why the [ɒ] in not often sounds different (more rounded) than the [ɒ] in hot, father, or car in American English. I know that in British English the vowel in not is an [ɔ], but ...
1
vote
2answers
85 views

Questions about some American English vocabulary [closed]

I was wondering if any American writers could give me some advice as to whether the following expressions/vocab are used and understood in the US: (words in bold are the ones I'm asking about. Some ...
3
votes
2answers
201 views

Plastic silverware - What's that? (American English)

I was surprised to discover that what we Brits call cutlery is called silverware in the U.S. To me the term 'silverware' refers to items that are made of pure silver or, at the very least, are ...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

Pronunciation of words that end with two syllabic R's

There are a few words in English that end with two adjacent syllabic R's (in theory). For example, let's take the word deliverer. As a non-native speaker, I find it very hard to pronounce those two ...
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0answers
34 views

What is the rule for pronouncing the “a”? [duplicate]

While British people mostly seem to speak a hard "a", American people tend to make an "ae" in some cases. Here are some examples of what I mean, grouped by pattern: glass/grass ...
1
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3answers
45 views

What is the word for showing affection for a certain team just for the sake of it?

I like a football team or show support for them purely because when I was being raised, everyone around me used to like that team. So I like them but its not like I care if they win or lose. Is there ...