This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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2
votes
1answer
155 views

He/She/It on Imaginary/Fantasy figures [closed]

Consider that you have a fantasy figure, when writing a comic/book. Could you refer to this figure as he/she without being grammatically incorrect? Example: Daffy Duck likes his new boat. Because now ...
7
votes
1answer
444 views

What is an 'Iron Ring Event'

In a recent podcast of .Net rocks (at 45 minutes 29 seconds), regarding the future of software craftsmanship, it is postulated that there will be an 'Iron Ring Event' (if I heard it correctly). From ...
14
votes
1answer
17k views

Why is “fulfil” spelt as “fulfill” in American English?

In this answer, simplification is stated as one reason for spelling variations in American English. But unlike in color and favorite, the number of letters to spell the word in fulfil increases in ...
0
votes
3answers
18k views

Apartment number before or after house number and street [closed]

When writing an address, I wonder which comes first, the apartment number, or the house number and street name? Thanks! For example: 1234 Charles ST APT A Hollywood, CA 54321 or APT A, ...
2
votes
0answers
68 views

When do we pronounce “the” as “the” and when as “thi” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the pronunciation of “the?” I am not from the UK or the US, English is not my mother tongue. I pronounce "the" as "the" (with e sounding like the ...
1
vote
0answers
319 views

Anyway v.s. Anyways [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can “Anyways” be used at the beginning of a sentence? How did 'anyway' become 'anyways,' anyway? Is Anyways correct or Anyway correct? From ...
3
votes
4answers
6k views

Difference between “heck” and “hell”

Many say that one shouldn't use "hell" as it is informal. You can use "heck" instead. Both convey the same meaning. Then why this difference? Why can't one use "hell" everywhere?
0
votes
1answer
23k views

How many types of English are there? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What's the difference between the various dialects of English? I know of American English and British English, but how many other types of English are there?
6
votes
5answers
4k views

Is it always appropriate to reciprocate when asked “How are you?” [closed]

This question is related to When someone asks how are you, are you supposed to answer, "Good," or "Fine," and ask back?. There, the answer by z7sg Ѫ claims it is sometimes appropriate not to ...
10
votes
7answers
35k views

Is there a different understanding of “rubber” in British and American English?

I was well aware of the different meanings of rubber, not least because there are the same definitions in my mother-tongue. However, while reading a text about differences between British and American ...
2
votes
2answers
873 views

New Orleans Accent

I'd heard that New Orleans residents are more New York- than Southern-sounding. Recently, I saw some of the Khan Academy videos, and noticed that Salman Khan, who, as Wikipedia says, is from New ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there a clear delineation between the usages of 'this' and 'that' in American English?

One of my linguistics professors speaks English as a second language, and remarked that she never knows which of the two is appropriate. Given a list of examples, all native speakers in the classroom ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

American English without an accent

I have heard that in the Midwest region of the United States (Nebraska, etc.), people do not have an accent when speaking compared to people from the south or either coast. Is this true? Why? Please ...
0
votes
1answer
201 views

What do you call those stuff published in craigslist.com?

I was thinking about the word of those things which are published in craigslist.com and whether if I should call them ads? list? commercials? notice? promotion? flyers? or something else. To clear ...
5
votes
2answers
563 views

“E.g.” or “e. g.” (with a blank)?

What is the correct form, and why, in scientific papers (US English)? e.g. e. g.
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Difference in application of “in” and “at” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “In school” vs “at school” I've been writing some rules for an NLP recently, and I've come across a small problem... What is the difference in the ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Regional usage of “Violet” and “Purple”

I am looking to describe a flower such as the one in the following picture for a game: After showing the game to a number of beta testers, I noted that about half of them were fine with "violet" ...
11
votes
6answers
4k views

Is using the present perfect old fashioned?

I was talking to a Singaporean (English is her native language. I think, closer to American rather than British) friend. I learned in English class that you can use present perfect when there is a ...
6
votes
4answers
14k views

Either and vs. Either or

(1) In this question on math.SE a question about the meaning of 'either' before a list which ends with 'and'. The meaning of either a, b, c, or d is from this answer sort of clear in that it means ...
5
votes
4answers
878 views

Word for student's notebook

What is the American word for a notebook that students have at school in which they do their homework assignments? I mean the notebook in which a teacher marks good or bad behavior of a student and ...
6
votes
4answers
30k views

“Ground floor” vs. “first floor”

Is the bottom-most floor (on ground level not the basement) "ground floor" or "first floor" in America?
3
votes
4answers
2k views

What are the differences in pronunciation of “borrow”, “burrow” and “burro” in American English?

What are the differences in pronunciation of "borrow", "burrow" and "burro" in American English? To me they all sound quite the same, especially when spoken quickly.
5
votes
7answers
2k views

Subject–verb agreement — two schools of thought?

I wrote a sentence for our web site that was submitted for proofreading. The proofreader "corrected" my sentence. I asked how sure he was that he was correct and that I was incorrect. He explained ...
8
votes
4answers
5k views

Difference in [ə] pronunciation at the end of a word in British and American English

I grew up speaking American English (San Diego to be specific). When I hear someone who speaks British English say a word that ends in [ə], like banana, I hear a weak but distinct 'r' sound attached ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

What is packaging tape called in the US?

What is adhesive tape (or "Scotch" tape) that is used for packaging things is usually called in the United States? What verb do you usually use for "package something with packaging tape"? Maybe "to ...
6
votes
8answers
6k views

How to choose between British and American English for technical documents

I'm not a native English speaker. I'm Italian and I'm doing my thesis in the Netherlands. I have to write technical documents for non-native English speakers, so I didn't receive any advice for ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

What are the origins of the regional pronoun “yinz” of southwestern Pennsylvania?

A common informal word used in southwestern Pennsylvania and the forefront example of what is commonly known as "Pittsburghese" is the word yinz, pronounced /jɪnz/ in IPA. Alternatively it is less ...
15
votes
3answers
71k views

“Invite” vs. “invitation”

I hear a lot of people saying "Send me an invite". I always thought that it was an 'invitation'. Is "sending one an invite" accepted usage? Or is it incorrect? If I need to get my wedding invitation ...
16
votes
3answers
121k views

Date format in UK vs US

Why is the most common date format in the US like mm/dd/yyyy, whereas in Europe (including the UK) it's more common to have dd/mm/yyyy? Looking around, I found that the US form is actually the more ...
5
votes
4answers
5k views

What is the correct relative pronoun for “government”?

What is the correct relative pronoun for "government"? Which of the following phrases is correct? I am writing for an American [English] audience. The Queensland Government, who licenses several ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Is it “Sales collateral” or “Sales collaterals”?

My question is whether you use the plural or singular form — or either. Is there perhaps also a different usage in the US and the UK?
4
votes
4answers
88k views

How Many Diphthongs Are There In English?

I was talking to a person who said that there were only two. I think she said that the "ou" in house is one of the two. I told her that the way the letter "i" is pronounced is a diphthong, and she ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Meaning of the verb “to pooch”?

I'm familiar with the word pooch as a cute synonym of doggy, but here is pooch used as a verb: It was just a poorly done deal and it just so happens to be the biggest deal ever for Nasdaq and they ...
1
vote
1answer
8k views

Correct usage of “were” or “was”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “If I was” or “If I were”. Which is more common, and which is correct? I am unsure whether to use "were" or "was" in the following instances ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Meaning of “fresher than fresh” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Usage and correctness of the term “Better than Best” The fresher than fresh slogans of our relentless advertising What does fresher than fresh mean? Does ...
2
votes
2answers
502 views

How common is the short “be” in American English

A friend prompted me to look up the pronunciations of the homophones "be" (IPA: /bi/, /biː/) and "bee" (IPA: /biː/). We found that there are two ways to say "be" -- one is short and the other (the ...
1
vote
2answers
122 views

Is “after” in this context solely a local colloquialism?

There are a number of turns of phrase that I have to avoid as an English person speaking to an American audience. Would it be possible for someone to clarify whether this colloquialism is American-...
14
votes
3answers
52k views

What does the sentence “Butter my butt, call me a biscuit” mean?

What does this sentence mean? How do I use it? Butter my butt, call me a biscuit.
-1
votes
1answer
469 views

Is this a subject verb agreement error?

My English teacher says that the following is an "agreement" (which I assume means subject-verb agreement) error. He underlined the bolded parts of the sentence. According to Political Research ...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

How can I fix the passive voice error in this sentence?

To combat this, new security measures have been implemented such as identification checks and on-site police officers. The error is in bold. I've been reading online about passive voice but every ...
-2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there a single word that means “more informative”? [closed]

Looking for one word that means "more informative" or "more clear", "better communicates" etc...
2
votes
9answers
6k views

How do American English and British English use the definite article differently?

I decided to make sure that I know this important difference between American and British English, so I wrote what I have found out so far and I would be grateful to anyone who reads this and tells me ...
10
votes
7answers
42k views

“On/at/for/over the weekend” in American English

Some sources say that "at the weekend" is wrong, while other ones say it's correct. Which form is acceptable in American English? On Saturdays her sister Ann usually comes to stay with Mary on/...
-4
votes
2answers
1k views

“If I didn't have” vs. “if I had not had” for a hypothetical

I wrote: it would never have been possible if i didn't have interest in the least bit but a friend of mine told it is wrong and should be: it would never have been possible if i had not ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Use Schedule and Timetable together

The context is a course scheduling and the process in creating one: course scheduling. I have looked up, that schedule is typically used American English and timetable is typically used in British ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Guardrail vs Guard rail

I'm at odds with a colleague of mine over the correct spelling of the above title words. My stance is that they could BOTH possibly be correct. My question specifically is.... Could one spelling be ...
4
votes
2answers
23k views

“In college” versus “at college” versus “at university” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which one is more correct: “works at a university” or “works in a university”? It seems that only in the U.S. one says that they are or were "in ...
1
vote
3answers
8k views

Synonyms / slang words in American English to express “I am very excited for something”? [closed]

In British English we can say "I am keen to do something with you". Also: "Would you like to go to a concert?" A: "I'm keen for that!". What are some equivalents in American English? Is it "I want to ...
11
votes
9answers
2k views

American Equivalent of “Bog Standard”

I'm searching for an American English phrase that is the most readily equivalent to the British expression bog standard (which means, as I understand, plain, ordinary or unremarkable). I'm tempted to ...
6
votes
4answers
4k views

Is “jux” a real word?

Urbandictionary.com says it means: To rob. Verb. Present tense of juxt. It has 342 votes but I can't find any evidence of actual usage on a google or COCA search.