This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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2
votes
2answers
36 views

Commissionaire in American English?

As I understand it a "commissionaire" is only used in British English (or so says the dictionary), but then what is the American English alternative?
1
vote
1answer
55 views

“Seductive” as an adjective for describing snake

I would really appreciate if some native English speaker help me in clearing my doubt. Recently, in one of Indian English newspaper the column writer wrote the following: "A scary sci-fi scenario. ...
2
votes
2answers
128 views

“Nice shoes …” What does that phrase actually mean? [closed]

As from the title. I've been receiving this from a security guard, when attending a developer conference, well, a bit overdressed (wearing a suit where all the other nerds just appeared in t-shirt, ...
5
votes
2answers
108 views

How do I know if I have the Northern Cities Vowel Shift?

I grew up in Kalamazoo, MI, where (according to Wikipedia and other sources), many speakers have something called the Northern Cities Vowel Shift (NCS). So I'm trying to figure out if I'm one of them. ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

What else can you learn other than phrasal verb and idioms to sound like a native english speaker? [closed]

I have learnt a few phrasal verbs and idioms through a site that i found very helpful. I was wondering if there's anything else like this to learn to improve my English (I don't know what PV and ...
2
votes
3answers
130 views

Femicide vs feminicide

While using the term femicide I realised that the is another term, probably a synonym, feminicide. From the following Wikipedia extract, the two terms appear to be synonyms: Femicide or ...
0
votes
3answers
58 views

“wrench” is to “works” as “crimp” is to what?

It's commonly said that one puts or throws a "[monkey] wrench/(BrEng) spanner" in the "works", but what does one put a "crimp" into? CRIMP Google Image the act of crimping. a crimped ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

small question about the or a

I and my wife are debating which way is correct when using the or a in our example. We are talking about a gender of our first baby. I prefer using: a gender of the baby is a boy. However, she ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Can I write “…argue it sufficiently…”?

in a scientific paper written in American English, I am using the following sentence: "...we would argue that it is sufficiently established that..." Can the sentence be shortened to "...we would ...
3
votes
2answers
193 views

How to pronounce 'almond' in American English

I cannot count how many times I was told and/or made fun of my allegedly incorrect pronunciation of almond. Every single one of my attempted pronunciations has been 'corrected'; even the so-called ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

What's a word for someone who is constantly asking for same thing? [closed]

Hi I'm looking for a word for someone who is constantly asking for something and keeps wanting updates about it. The closest words I can think of is pushy and, to a lesser extent, annoying. But ...
1
vote
2answers
51 views

What do you call someone who keeps asking other people to buy them things when they can just buy it themselves?

What do you call someone who asks other people to buy them things when they could just buy it themselves.
1
vote
1answer
35 views

What should I call classwork at the start of a period?

So as far as I can remember, whenever a teacher gives you work at the beginning of a class period, they are called "Drills" or "Warm-ups"; however, friends that I have talked to from other schools ...
0
votes
4answers
39 views

What's a word for “newcomer to politics”?

Incumbent means someone who currently holds office. Is there a word that describes someone who is completely new to politics, like "rookie" does for sports. I feel like "rookie" doesn't fit well ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

How will “winning” be percieved?

If I use the phrase "winning business" as a byline to a logo. How will it generally be percieved? 1) Like a winning business 2) Like the act of winning business 3) Doesn't make any sense to have ...
0
votes
2answers
23 views

Is in bad condition the same meaning as bent out of shape? [closed]

Is in bad condition the same meaning as bent out of shape ?
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Order of words?

Which is the most correct to write? Printed Arabic-English Text Recognition. or Recognition of Printed Arabic-English Text. In my opinion, both are correct but since i am not a native ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

May “in with” be used to mean “among?”

I was thinking about how little I use the word among and how I would phrase the dictionary's example sentences for it. Most of it involved substitution with the word with. Then I noticed something. ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

AmE: virgin forest

First time coming across the term virgin forest. Wiki gives a bunch of alternatives: Old-growth Forests An old-growth forest — also termed primary forest, virgin forest, primeval forest, late ...
4
votes
1answer
20 views

Please help me to understand the following definition of “Precautionary Principle”

for "precautionary princple", it gives the following definition. where there are threats or serious or irreversible damage, lack of full scientific cerntainty shall not be used as a reason for ...
6
votes
2answers
348 views

Should I pronounce little as ['lit(ə)l] or ['lid(ə)l]

I guess some people may give a down-vote to my silly question, but I still want to make it clear, at least for myself. Since English is not my first language, I watch a lot of online videos learn the ...
69
votes
14answers
10k views

Is it conceivable that President Obama might use the word “queue”?

President Obama in a press conference, in London today, has said that if Britain votes to leave the European Union and makes separate application to the United States for a trade deal, she will be at ...
2
votes
2answers
92 views

polite questions vs. direct questions: real life reactions [closed]

In English courses (especially business), we learn to use polite questions. So we know that you shouldn't say "excuse me... where's the nearest supermarket, please?" but rather "excuse me... do you ...
0
votes
2answers
411 views

What is the origin of “Act your age, not your shoe size”?

I have been thinking about this saying a lot in the past week (and yes I saw Prince in concert 30 years ago, and the Ramones the same night), but I have heard it since I was a child. I guess I find it ...
0
votes
7answers
123 views

Looking for suitable word for doing errand jobs / petty jobs [closed]

I am looking for a suitable word for doing errand / petty jobs. Clerk is not the right word.
1
vote
2answers
63 views

Is there a word meaning “of or like the squid”?

I would like to know if there is a word for being of or related to a squid like there are words for humans, eagles, and lions, i.e. hominine, aquiline, and leonine. I don't expect the word (if there ...
4
votes
2answers
35 views

what is word used to describe that “meaning has lost from originality”

I remember that many words on time get separated out from its actual meaning and people start using it for random cases to express different emotions or cases. There is word that describes this ...
5
votes
1answer
156 views

Why do Americans 'tell' you Good Morning?

Why do Americans 'tell' you Good Morning? Isn't it a greeting rather than information? This is a quote from a book I am currently reading, "She went through to the kitchen to tell her children ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Using a comma to seperate these clauses? [closed]

English is my second language. A co-worker who edits my work wrote the following two phrases: This way, workers can install the guardrail for the next level from a lower platform eliminating the ...
2
votes
1answer
139 views

Is the third conditional disappearing in American English?

New Zealander here. I came across a sentence similar to the following: If I moved, I might've been found. To me, this is grammatically incorrect. It should be: If I'd moved, I might've been ...
0
votes
1answer
131 views

Is “take a bath” or “bathe” used to mean “take a shower” in some English dialects?

By analogy with Portuguese tomar banho [de chuveiro/ducha], which along with tomar uma ducha/chuveirada (Br.)/duche (Port.) means, take a shower, are there any parts of the English speaking world in ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Difference between 'REVERENCE' and 'DEFERENCE'

MY EFFORT: this a straight-forward question. I was practising for 'SAT' and met a question which required knowledge of difference between the afore-mentioned two words. I have searched the following 2 ...
-1
votes
2answers
80 views

Why can't I use “have” in given example? [closed]

How come in following sentence "have" is an incorrect word to use and "has" is correct one? "Working for many years in academic and administration fields have not only contributed to my professional ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

laden vs. loaded [closed]

I was justed asked whether it's a british idiom to say something, for example a car is 'fully laden' as in American English 'loaded' would be used. Does anyone here know about this issue? Thanks &...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

“Am I (ever) [adj.] ” vs. “How [adj.] I am”

What's the difference between saying, Boy, am I happy to see you again! Damn, am I ever lucky to have a friend like you! -and- Boy, how happy I am to see you again! Damn, how lucky ...
7
votes
10answers
988 views

word(s) to describe someone judge others by one tiny detail

I wonder if there is a word or a few words or phases that describe a person very often: judge a person based on one or two tiny details or critise harshly over small mistakes that one made (...
1
vote
0answers
95 views

Phrasal verbs with synonymous opposites

There are some cases in English where one can substitute in a word that normally has an opposite meaning, but instead produces the same meaning. For examples, consider the following meanings and uses:...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

Is “go exercising” ungrammatical or non-standard?

Friends, I think the phrase "go exercise" is spoken in colloquial English. But I can still find the phrase "go exercising," even in Google books. Like the excerpt below: I like to exercise, but ...
7
votes
3answers
283 views

What is the origin of the suffixes “statin” and “medin”?

In medicine, there are the terms "statin" and "medin". For example, there is somatostatin and somatomedin (growth hormone). It's obvious that somato- is Latin, but what about the rest? Were "statin" ...
3
votes
1answer
78 views

Did the Marshallplan help export the English language? [closed]

I am currently doing research about the English language and how it is dominating non-English speaking countries (music, movies, etc). I've read some interesting facts and I want your opinion about it ...
10
votes
9answers
349 views

“bucking for” .. like Klinger

In the culturally referrent 1970s USA TV show "MASH", about the Korean war, character Corporal Klinger acts "crazy", specifically wearing female clothing, ... because he is bucking for a section 8 ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

What is a word for an “inverse panorama”? [closed]

Specifically, what is a word for the action of taking several pictures of an object from multiple, regular angles and has the same connotation as "panorama" (where you would take multiple pictures of ...
3
votes
1answer
160 views

“receptacle” vs. “outlet” in AmEng

What's the difference between receptacle and outlet to cal the device in a wall you put a plug into in order to provide electricity for a lamp, television, etc.? outlet (also receptacle,...
1
vote
2answers
111 views

How do you show someone is crying in dialogue?

How do you show someone is crying in dialogue? (as in, is there an onomatopoeia that can show crying well? I ask because "(insert dialogue)..sniffle..(insert dialogue)..snifle..", does show that the ...
-2
votes
2answers
62 views

Which one is correct ? Do you know english better than me or Are you know english better than me? [closed]

Which one is correct ? a) Do you know english better than me ? b) Are you know english better than me ?
1
vote
2answers
122 views

AmEng equivalent for BrEng “circus”

Is there a word in American English that comes anywhere close to what British English circus encapsulates, that is, Chiefly British An open circular place where several streets intersect. (AHDEL) ...
0
votes
2answers
342 views

Is “hail from (somewhere)” necessarily formal English?

Macmillan dictionary says hail from is "formal". link Cambridge dictionary notes hail from as "formal" in British English but doesn't say this for American English. link Oxford Learners ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

What does “or” mean in “nothing is known or can be known” [duplicate]

The definition of agnosticism is: A person who believes that nothing is known or can be known of the existence or nature of God or of anything beyond material phenomena; a person who claims ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

“The Stars and Stripes” vs. “Old Glory” vs. “The Star-Spangled Banner”

Is there a difference in using any which of those terms to call the national flag of the U.S.? Which one is most commonly used? The Stars and Stripes The national flag of the U.S., ...
1
vote
2answers
87 views

word for a condescending, snarky, yet awkward and jealous, person

i'm looking for a word for a person who is cynical, judgmental, nitpicking, condescending but also flawed, gawky and timid (in an unfamiliar setting), and is harboring some kind of jealousy towards ...