This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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0
votes
1answer
57 views

What does You play to pay mean? Thanks.

Actually it's from comedy, Weird loners. What does You play to pay mean? Thanks. Text from phone : Where's my money ? I know where you live. You play to pay ! 1K tomorrow. In case you can't ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Can I express “comparision” in this way?

Can I use "comparision" in this way: For the purpose of making fair comparisions among them, I have to drop my bias.
0
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0answers
25 views

Is this a right way to use “patience”?

Is it a right way to use "patience" here? Thank you for giving me so much help and great patience Thank you so much!
0
votes
2answers
47 views

Meaning of quote [on hold]

What does the below quote mean? Just when you get used to today, along comes tomorrow
3
votes
3answers
232 views

Give it me! Write me! [duplicate]

Our young grandson, who is a Mancunian, says 'give it me', and 'give it me back', which is a northern British standard. It made me think that it is not only northerners who omit the indirect object ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

How can I express this in another way?

I want to express the following sentence in another way. The first algorithm was applied to obtain the norm solution by gradually decreasing the value of X. Can anyone give me some help? Thank ...
-1
votes
1answer
22 views

How to use other ways to express the same meaning of a sentence?

I want to express the following sentence in several other ways: The five flowers selected by using Method 2 is selected from the 10 flowers already selected by Method 1. Can anyone give me some ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

Origin of the phrases “out back” and “out front”?

I'm going through the Song of Ice and Fire books, and although it's mostly written in what appears to be British English, very occasionally Americanisms sneak in. One example that I just noticed is ...
3
votes
2answers
51 views

What does Mitt Romney’s “yams” mean?

There was the following passage in Vanity Fair's (May 16) article titled, "Mitt “Bird Legs” Romney is ready for his boxing match.”: Romney also revealed two nicknames. As a high-schooler, he was ...
2
votes
3answers
253 views

“Homosexual” or “Gay and Lesbian”? [on hold]

I have faced a problem with my writing which I could really do with some clarification on. My question applies to both British and American English (which is fairly standard on the internet). ...
2
votes
3answers
80 views

How to respond to “I'm sorry” appropriately

One thing that's been bugging me about English recently: Let's say I stole Joe's gym socks. Then a month later I went to Joe and said "I'm sorry I stole your socks." Joe's typical response would be ...
3
votes
3answers
87 views

What AmE dialect has “et” as the past tense of “eat”?

In several books and TV shows, there have been characters who say "et" instead of "ate" (As in, "I et dinner yesterday at 6:00"). I looked it up on Wiktionary, which defines it but doesn't say where ...
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3answers
33 views

Can I use “I will / In my opinion” in an academic essay?

The title of the essay specifically mentioned that you need to provide your opinions on this issue. So I argued with gf and she said it is wrong to write something like: "In this essay, ...., and ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

“How you can you not” vs “how can you not”

Is "How you can you not" grammatically correct? For example in the following sentence: We still aren't sure that there's any Golden hiding in her but whatever her lineage how you can you not love ...
1
vote
2answers
50 views

Which is the appropriated term to refer to the paper with barcodes that you pay in your internet banking or physical bank?

I have an issue with an online purchase in the Steam platform. Now I need to open a ticket to get my issue solved, but I do not know which is the correct term to refer to the payment method that I ...
1
vote
3answers
31 views

Would I need a comma after the main clause here?

Would I need a comma before the word "as" in this sentence? The word "fear" also takes a new meaning(,) as it comes to represent a more self-centered notion.
2
votes
1answer
50 views

cancelled with two L's a generation thing or regional thing?

In the United States, we spell canceled with one l (or at least I grew up learning and using canceled with one l). However, now I see more and more people especially in blogs using cancelled, and ...
3
votes
3answers
373 views

Use of 'pagan' in an essay: is it acceptable or not?

I'm writing an essay right now and I'm deliberating whether or not I should use Pagan gods instead of Greek gods (to provide variation in the essay). I've looked up the word pagan in the dictionary ...
1
vote
3answers
210 views

How to avoid using lot of I's in the personal essay? [closed]

I am writing my statement of purpose for applying to grad school. When I read my statement of purpose I see a lot of "I"s: I did this I worked on this I want to I got to learn this I got ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Sample Curriculum for levels of English users [closed]

Just curious, where can I find a sample TEFL curriculum for different levels of English users for the ff: Basic, Elementary, pre-intermediate, intermediate, upper intermediate and advance? I'm really ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

How do you pronounce “is there” in fast speech?

I'm not a native speaker of English, and I was recently puzzled with the question, "How can Americans put their tongue in z (is) position and then change to th (there) in such short time?" May you ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Correct way to introduce yourself [duplicate]

In an interview, what is the correct way to introduce yourself? Some use "myself" and their name, and some use "I'm ___." I'm confused about what I use. Please guide me.
2
votes
2answers
69 views

Is “have/has got” a perfect for BrE, but not AmE?

In BrE the past participle of get is in most cases got, while in AmE it is almost always gotten. Does that imply that in the context of BrE "have/has got" is a genuine perfect construction, whereas ...
5
votes
5answers
495 views

Do Americans leave the ordinal suffix out of dates?

Do Americans leave the ordinal suffix out of dates? By 'ordinal suffix' I mean '-th', '-nd', '-rd', e.g. 'April 17' instead of 'April 17th'. If they do, is there an explanation for this behavior?
11
votes
3answers
2k views

Answering “Have you got” questions with “I do”

For the question "Have you got any ice cream?" which is correct: Yes I do Yes I have or inversely No I don't No I haven't got any
6
votes
4answers
14k views

“Ground floor” vs. “first floor”

Is the bottom-most floor (on ground level not the basement) "ground floor" or "first floor" in America?
-1
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0answers
18 views

“The whole market doesn't know” versus “Not all of the market knows”

I've heard various examples of this in American speech (I'm British) and it always strikes me as incorrect. Statements like: "The whole market doesn't know..." I would phrase as: "Not all of the ...
0
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2answers
24 views

Does MEMO mean memory? [closed]

Jezz.. How did I miss the memo of Brooklyn? Does MEMO mean memory ? Thank you very much.
0
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3answers
33 views

What preposition should I use when talking about computer and softwares [duplicate]

My question is about prepositions and what to use when talking about computer and software. I will Install a software (in,on,into) my computer a software was installed (in,on,into) my computer
2
votes
4answers
175 views

Pronunciation Feedback Required

Did I pronounce the phrase "I'm gonna be gone for five weeks" correctly? https://clyp.it/oobrogbu Phonetically it looks like: [aɪm gɑnə bɪ gɔn fər faɪv wiks]. I have no idea which words should I ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

“In the cards”, “on the cards” origin(s)

In another question in EL&U "Positives changes on the cards" — meaning? , it came up that at least one of us AmE speakers had always heard this idiom as "in the cards" and never as "on ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

'What are you' and 'what do you': same pronunciation in AmE…?

The ELL question Do Americans pronounce 'are' as 'do' in 'what are waiting for?' brought to my attention something I've not noticed before. In normal conversational (or faster) speech, it seems What ...
1
vote
2answers
785 views

“Sport” vs “Sports” Origin

I was recently reading this article on the use of "math" vs. "maths" as a collective noun (Americans use the former, Brits the latter). However, the trend seen in "math/maths" is reversed in ...
1
vote
1answer
117 views

Who is Taller/Tallest/The Tallest?

Who is ____________ , Sara or Janet? This is a confusing question because I'm not sure which is correct: tallest taller the tallest Seem to all work fine. Which one is considered "best"?
5
votes
2answers
2k views

“Cancellation”, “Canceled”, “Canceling” — US usage

I'm trying to figure out if there is a specific rule behind the word "cancel" that would cause "cancellation" to have two L's, but "canceled" and "canceling" to have only one (in the US). I ...
0
votes
1answer
89 views

Pronunciation of What do you want to do?

When I pronounce the question: "What do you want to do?", I hear some stress on the first syllable of "whaddya" and "wanna" and a bit stronger stress on "do". This is how I pronounce it: ...
6
votes
3answers
813 views

Etymology of 'Pizzazz'

A question from December 2011 asked What is the social context of "pizzazz"?. I'm curious about the word's etymology. I checked some reference books, but they showed very little agreement ...
6
votes
2answers
387 views

What does “We don’t do anything that’s not completely up and up” mean?

I found an amusing story titled “Lobster salad, but a key ingredient was missing” in today’s (August 11)New York Times NY/Region section. The article reports that Zabar’s, the famous grocery in ...
27
votes
8answers
3k views

How did “stuck-up” get to mean “snob”?

I was inclined to believe that the expression "stuck-up", meaning staying aloof from others because one thinks one is superior, had its origins with somebody's nose stuck (up) in the air and yet, ...
2
votes
6answers
2k views

How does “spanner” come to mean “a wrench”?

"Wrenching" refers to an injury in which some muscle is forcibly twisted. A wrench is a tool that applies a twisting force to something, so that seems consistent. "To span" means to bridge a gap. ...
-1
votes
1answer
67 views

Possessive when both refer to a plural: “Hume's and Kant's moral systems” or “Hume and Kant's moral systems”?

Title says it all. What's the correct possessive to use when they both refer to the same noun? "Hume's and Kant's moral systems" or "Hume and Kant's moral systems"? Hume and Kant both have one moral ...
2
votes
8answers
4k views

How do American English and British English use the definite article differently?

I decided to make sure that I know this important difference between American and British English, so I wrote what I have found out so far and I would be grateful to anyone who reads this and tells me ...
1
vote
8answers
134 views

Word/phrase for remarks which often have a dark feel to them but whose meanings are not readily apparent? [closed]

I know someone who has a tendency to make strange remarks whose meanings are not readily apparent, remarks which often have a dark feel to them, but which are left unexplained, as if to hide ...
3
votes
3answers
24k views

Difference between “get” and “take”

What is the difference between "get" and "take"? Both are used to describe receiving something. By intuition I mostly guess which one to use, but would like to know some rule which will stick in my ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Slang for giving the way to do something, not for giving the final thing itself

Someone asks how to grow a chicken, and suddenly some guy just drops a chicken already grown up. I need to find an algorithm to solve a given problem, but I don't want the code itself, just ...
1
vote
5answers
265 views

English- What are some other ways to say “make a difference” [closed]

I'm looking for other ways to phrase "I want to make a difference/impact" in a general and positive way. Something along the lines of making a change in the world or having a meaningful contribution ...
8
votes
2answers
450 views

Q: Why isn't he answering? A: 1) He must have already slept 2) … must have been sleeping?

I didn't reply to a ping in the chatroom. The English enthusiast suggested this about me at the time: He must have already slept. Hours (and dreams) later, I came back, I saw the above ...
0
votes
2answers
95 views

Proper use of “repertoire”

Could the word repertoire be used to describe one’s behavior as a façade?
2
votes
2answers
67 views

Where did the term “Square Meal” come from?

In several older TV shows (think Andy Griffith) I've heard the term "Square Meal" used to describe an ideal hardy and nutritious meal. The term can be applied to breakfast, lunch and dinner. Where ...
9
votes
1answer
10k views

Why is “fulfil” spelt as “fulfill” in American English?

In this answer, simplification is stated as one reason for spelling variations in American English. But unlike in color and favorite, the number of letters to spell the word in fulfil increases in ...