0
votes
3answers
218 views

Why Is “You did well.” Even Grammatically Correct (American English)?

One of the classic battles prescriptive grammarians fight is that "You did good." is grammatically wrong, while "You did well." is correct. The justification for this is that "well" is a legitimate ...
1
vote
1answer
140 views

How do I use “as of now” correctly?

Just to clarify, I am not a native English speaker. I occasionally hear from other non-native English speakers the use of the phrase: "As of now" with the meaning of Currently. Initially I did not ...
-1
votes
1answer
45 views

Would you guys change the following sentence suitable for my cover letter? [closed]

I need your help guys:) I am applying for an instructor position at a university in the States. Would you please change the following statement appropriate for my cover letter? "My bachelor's degree ...
2
votes
3answers
57 views

Is “for short” correct?

In conversation I used the phrase "for short" in the context: "I will call you blank for short." I know I've heard the phrase before, but I'm wondering if it is actually acceptable English? If ...
0
votes
1answer
88 views

Can we use both British English and American English in the same article?

Can we use British English trends and American English trends (such as spelling, or turns of phrase) in different sentences in the one topic?
0
votes
1answer
102 views

I don't understande the usage of “either” in this sentence

"I couldn't sleep last night. I bet you guys couldn't either". Does the second sentence mean "I bet you too, guys"? Is it correct to use "either" like that or is it just slang?
0
votes
0answers
196 views

“Order something done” for “Order something to be done” [duplicate]

As far as your variety of English goes, can the verbal turn "order something done" be used interchangeably with "order something to be done"? "We ordered this item sent to our local store." ...
0
votes
2answers
118 views

“On the air” OR “On air”

Do you remember Northern Exposure? I hope so. Chris had a light-sign in his office: http://nevergoodbye.com/go/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/totalchris.gif And when you search google images for "on the ...
-1
votes
1answer
177 views

Got started or started

I am a learner of the English language. I have written two sentences, please give your two minutes and let me know, which one is correct? In the below sentences an action was started by my dog, for an ...
-1
votes
3answers
3k views

“There is a lot of food and fruit” vs. “there are a lot of food and fruit” [duplicate]

Which of the following sentences is correct: There is a lot of food and fruit in the supermarket. There are a lot of food and fruit in the supermarket.
0
votes
2answers
147 views

Can I use Partty (with double “t”) instead of Party? [closed]

I am looking for a domain name that ends with Party. However, those names I am looking are already taken. So if I use, lets say , www.WePartty.com (with double 't') instead of www.WeParty.com , would ...
3
votes
3answers
198 views

Give it me! Write me! [duplicate]

Our young grandson, who is a Mancunian, says 'give it me', and 'give it me back', which is a northern British standard. It made me think that it is not only northerners who omit the indirect object ...
-1
votes
2answers
754 views

To work under the advisory of?

I want to describe my current research-assistant position saying that "I work under the advisory of John Green". Is this the correct way of saying that my advisor is John Green? If not, what is the ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

How do they express the time, in American and British English?

I don't know if this is a good question. But as far as I know, and as I do it, American English also say "after" other than "past" in expressing times. For example, a quarter after six instead of, a ...
4
votes
3answers
306 views

Is it Standard American English to ever contract “did” as “-'d”?

Assuming that it is Standard American English to contract would as -'d, is it standard to contract did as -'d? For example: I would really like to have a glass of single malt scotch right now. ...
2
votes
8answers
12k views

What do you call a person who motivates or inspires?

My choices so far: motivational source inspirational source source of motivation source of inspiration Being a non-native speaker, I don't know which one to use. What I want to say is that ...
-2
votes
1answer
2k views

If I am saying “Someone and Myself's (possession)”, what would the correct usage in this phrase be? [duplicate]

I was just wondering how to properly use the phrase, I am trying to talk about something that belongs to both my friend and myself so how would I say that? My friend and myself's? or a different way?
1
vote
4answers
703 views

“I and others” or “others and I”?

I have traditionally learned that a first-person pronoun should always come last in a list, e.g. Bob and I found this to be interesting. However, it sounds awkward to me when this rule is used ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

“Had spent” vs. “has spent” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: where should we use has/have been and had been? [Company] had spent previous years a few blocks away from the new location. This sentence uses "had spent", but to ...
0
votes
2answers
362 views

Use of a pronoun in a neither/nor construction [closed]

Neither Ms. Perez nor Ms. Yanaka believes that watching as much television as her son Sam does will lead to anything productive. Is her correct? or should it be their?
7
votes
2answers
919 views

Wedding invitations in British English

I'm an American calligrapher living in France, designing a suite of wedding invitations for a Spanish bride living in London! Complicated enough? I can't really go to the bride with questions ...
-1
votes
2answers
500 views

Does “dining” refer only to “dinner”? [closed]

Does dining refer only to dinner? What should I say when I am not joining a team/group for lunch? Is the following grammatical? Sorry I'm not dining with you for the lunch. Is "for the lunch" ...
2
votes
1answer
15k views

Correct way of saying “errands to run” [closed]

Which is the correct way to tell someone that I have errands to run? Are all of these fine to say in person and in an email? I got some errands to run or is it I have errands to run or ...
-1
votes
1answer
91 views

Confused about grammar [closed]

I would like to know what the difference is between the following sentences: A PM (project manager) can only track so many items Only PM can track so many items Is the first sentence grammatically ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Is this sentence correct in grammar and does it even make sense [closed]

This sentence: You have the right to ask for someone in the United States of America. Does it have any grammatical errors? Does it even make sense? I think it is usually ...to ask for ...
6
votes
3answers
18k views

“Invite” vs. “invitation”

I hear a lot of people saying "Send me an invite". I always thought that it was an 'invitation'. Is "sending one an invite" accepted usage? Or is it incorrect? If I need to get my wedding invitation ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

What is the correct relative pronoun for “government”?

What is the correct relative pronoun for "government"? Which of the following phrases is correct? I am writing for an American [English] audience. The Queensland Government, who licenses several ...
9
votes
6answers
16k views

“On/at/for/over the weekend” in American English

Some sources say that "at the weekend" is wrong, while other ones say it's correct. Which form is acceptable in American English? On Saturdays her sister Ann usually comes to stay with Mary ...
-4
votes
2answers
868 views

Is this correct sentence?

I wrote: it would never have been possible if i didn't have interest in the least bit but a friend of mine told it is wrong and should be: it would never have been possible if i had not ...
1
vote
2answers
166 views

“Summoning something into life” vs. “summoning something to life”

What is the difference between the following? Summoning ... into life Summoning ... to life If it helps, I want to use the word idea in the place of dots so it's like: Summoning ...
1
vote
1answer
906 views

Mixing British and American spellings in writing [closed]

I like color more than colour, but I like favourite more than favorite. For me it is better to write My favourite color is blue. Is it wrong to mix British and American spellings in writing, and ...
3
votes
3answers
178 views

“Be able to,” “can” in reduced relative pronouns

I am trying to remember whether the sentences below are correct: I don't know this guy being able to complete this task. I don't know this guy can complete this task. I think the first one is ...
1
vote
5answers
4k views

What is the opposite of “Could you talk a little louder”?

In a conversation, when I don't hear someone, I usually say: Could you talk a little louder please? However, what should I say if: Someone is being very loud in the other room when talking on ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

“Late to the party” vs. “late for the party”

I've heard both versions, usually in similar contexts. Which one is correct or more correct — or more prevalent — in the USA? He: This deal ends at 7 p.m. She: Sucks, I am late to the party.
2
votes
3answers
5k views

Which of these two sentences is correct (“processes” vs. “process”)?

Which of the following two sentences is correct? Read more about the processes behind my projects. ...or... Read more about the process behind my projects. The one on top looks right ...
13
votes
2answers
11k views

Why is the phrase “should have went” so widely used?

Rarely do we hear "should have gone" in common speech. Some background: My father immigrated to the US in the late 60s. He learned English first overseas, British English. Then he studied extensively ...
7
votes
4answers
13k views

Which is more correct: “burgled” or “burglarized”?

Which is more correct: We were burgled yesterday. or We were burglarized yesterday. I'm from the U.K. and never use burglarized but my friend from the U.S.A. seems to think it's OK.
4
votes
2answers
2k views

When did “y'all” become improper?

It is my understanding that the contraction y'all was considered correct American English in times past. At what point was this word removed from valid American English?