0
votes
2answers
51 views

A common word for something Simple yet Powerful [closed]

As the title says: what is a common word for something simple yet powerful?
4
votes
3answers
12k views

“Elder brother” or “older brother”?

I've read both forms in newspapers and online news: elder brother and older brother. What's the difference between them? When should I use which?
1
vote
2answers
750 views

What is correct “Blazing Fast Speed” or “Blazingly Fast Speed”?

Which is correct? "Blazing Fast Speed" or "Blazingly Fast Speed"? In my opinion, the latter because one can't say, for one, "Amazing Fast Speed", right? Admittedly NY Times use it a lot but...: NY ...
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

What's the difference between “ex-” and “former” [closed]

Is there any real difference in usage between ex- and former?
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Battery is flat

I was born and raised in some anglophone Asian country where people use the word "flat" to describe a battery when no electrical current can be generated by it. Some would even use the word "flat" to ...
0
votes
3answers
237 views

“I went to bed hungry” vs. “I went to bed hungrily” [closed]

What is the exact difference between "I went to bed hungry" and "I went to bed hungrily"?
10
votes
3answers
568 views

“You are likely to [verb]” vs. “you are like to [verb]”

In a recent answer to another question, a fellow poster just used the following turn of phrase: The nearest you’re like to get is [word][.] I only ever saw and used "you’re likely to..." myself, ...
1
vote
1answer
348 views

A single word for “blind” and “slow on the uptake” [closed]

We have a word tiomny in Russian which has the meanings blind, dim, and dumb. Is there a word (possibly slang) in American English which is as close in meaning to both blind and slow on the uptake?
2
votes
2answers
128 views

US English — “primary grains being produced” vs. “major cereals being produced”

I am correcting a Spanish-to-English translation that states, The primary grains being produced in the world are maize, wheat, rice, barley, sorghum and oats. I would prefer to use cereals ...
13
votes
9answers
1k views

Simple English for “filling hunger”

I'm looking for a (preferably) one-word term to describe a meal that's filling. I'd like to avoid ambiguity with the substance put inside cakes, also called filling. Satiating appears to be too ...
5
votes
3answers
7k views

“Ground floor” vs. “first floor”

Is the bottom-most floor (on ground level not the basement) "ground floor" or "first floor" in America?
1
vote
1answer
909 views

What kind of rain is “sprinkles”?

It appears that MSN Weather has chosen an amusing adjective (from my British point of view) for the weather today: I'm assuming the precipitation (sadly) won't contain any hundreds-and-thousands. ...
-3
votes
2answers
323 views

Does using an adverb three times almost always imply the opposite?

Dana is very, very, very nice. A real housewife of Beverly Hills It seems that almost exclusively, the reiteration of a such a clarifier - very in this case - ends up actually meaning the ...
2
votes
2answers
498 views

Meaning of “mints”

Context (New York Times), MINTS An organic fudge brownie awaits you in the room, along with a personalized welcome letter... First, I'm not sure if I'm on the right track or not (I'm wondering ...
10
votes
4answers
40k views

“Pricey” vs. “Pricy”

I've recently encountered these two variations of the spellings for the informal word for "expensive." My dictionary and the online dictionary seem to indicate that both of these spellings are ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

Preventative vs. preventive

In this answer about the non-word disabilitated, the word preventative is compared (unfavourably, if my reading of the implication is correct) to preventive. However, I have always used preventative, ...