Tagged Questions

This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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0
votes
1answer
23 views

What sentence does not belong?

I am trying to figure out the sentence that does not belong to this paragraph. The researchers developed three criteria for the test subjects. The test subjects needed to be women because the drug ...
2
votes
1answer
94 views

Are there any famous English poems that every British-raised or American-raised person knows? [on hold]

In the Chinese language, there is a poem named Quiet Night Thoughts(Jing Ye Si) by Li Bai, which is known by everyone that is native to China (from little kids to very old people, even if they are ...
-1
votes
0answers
18 views

Use of final “s” in -word endings: which words in AmE are correct?

DFW said [0]: The preposition towards is British usage; the US spelling is toward ... Except for backwards and afterwards, no preposition ending in –word takes a final s in US usage." Is that ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

“Know the way over”

You tell someone that, if a disaster happen at your place, you're going to go to his/her place (kidding). They reply: "I am glad you still know the way over". What does this mean?
-2
votes
0answers
23 views

How do I translate this to English? [on hold]

This is a nice quote from a Sergio Leone's movie: Quando un uomo con la pistola incontra un uomo col fucile, quello con la pistola è un uomo morto what is the best translation for it?
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Need vs. Needs? [duplicate]

I heard a person on television say the following... "Pittsburgh need to win this game." To me, this sounds incorrect. I think it should be "needs to." If however, the announcer had said... ...
0
votes
4answers
39 views

A word to describe a person who is in top/winning bracket of a competitive game

I am looking for a word that would describe a player who is, for example, in a TOP 10 chart and is eligible for a prize. That means that if he would suddenly lose his/her position and get ranked 11 or ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

Is there such a thing as American English Vs British English when it comes to grammar [closed]

Is there really a difference between American English and British English when it comes to grammar/syntax. I thought the difference only existed in pronunciation of words and preference of certain ...
2
votes
1answer
297 views

The lost English dictionary

There is an old dictionary of the English language where words are defined from a pessimistic/skeptical/sadistic perspective. I seem to have lost the link to that dictionary in my bookmarks. I wonder ...
-1
votes
3answers
36 views

need confirmation or needs confirmation

I receive an issue reported in an issue tracker. That issue requires confirmation to check if it is a real issue. How should the label be names as: Need confirmation or Needs confirmation?
-3
votes
0answers
53 views

How to start and finish an email/letter in a very formal/polite way? [closed]

What are some email polite regards for finish an email or an statement of purpose document in English?. I would like to be very polite and formal. I'm applying to graduate studies.
-2
votes
3answers
52 views

Lookig for a better/stronger sentence [closed]

Could anybody let me know a stronger/improved sentence for the one shown below: One of my interest is in applying machine learning to real world problems
0
votes
0answers
32 views

What does “globally implored collapse” mean? [closed]

Heard somebody use it today. I think "globally implored collapse" means the collapse of somebody or something that a lot of people were begging for and wanting to see. What do you guys think?
0
votes
1answer
80 views

What does “Way to read the room” mean?

I'm translating a movie and there's one sentence I could not understand. In the movie a doctor tells his friend: Doctor: Find something sharp to penetrate his skull.(to help the patient). ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

'parameterized' or 'parametrized' [duplicate]

In the following sentence: To avoid the attacks, most frameworks and DB systems provide mechanism for parameterized queries. My browser wants to correct the highlighted word to parametrized, but ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

What mind stands for [closed]

The difinition of mind that parts of individual feels, perceives, thinks, wills, and especially reasons is a common presence in dictionaries,however,what it stand for?Brain?
2
votes
1answer
94 views

Where in the U.S. do people change the stress of umbrella, adult and TV to the first syllable?

Is it just a small percentage of the population in that region who stress the first syllable, or is it widespread? In other words, if I visit such region will I find almost everyone talking like that ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

What does “peak and pine” mean in this ballad?

From scoutsongs.com Oh, My Darling Clementine In a cavern, In a canyon, Excavating for a mine, Dwelt a miner forty-niner, And his daughter Clementine. Chorus: Oh my darling, Oh my darling, ...
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

Spelling - why not finanse?

If it is license rather than licence, defense rather than defence, offense rather than offence, then why not finanse?
2
votes
2answers
122 views

His “get-up-and-go” is likely to have “got-up-and-gone” Any hidden meaning in this comment?

I once overheard a conversation between two young women on a long distance flight and one of them said: "He is past seventy, you know. His get-up-and-go is likely to have got-up-and gone." And they ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

“I” vs. “me” question

I was born in United States but at a young age my parents decided to take me and my siblings to Turkey. It looks right to me, but my English teacher always (and I mean always) points out mistakes ...
0
votes
2answers
102 views

“Jimmy did his homework and so didn't his brother” Is this correct?

Shouldn't it be "...and so did his brother"? I got confused when I read the original sentence in an American newspaper some time ago. It read something like this: "US Representative from ...
-1
votes
1answer
25 views

Third-party or third party? [duplicate]

Does British English use a dash in between third-party, or is that for American English?
2
votes
3answers
87 views

Does the phrase “espoused narrative” make sense?

Recently I've been told my usage of this term is incorrect, but I've seen it being used often enough. Context I've pulled from google "This may well also allow the EU to illegitimate these ...
2
votes
1answer
38 views

Difference between 'created by' and 'created from'

I am writing an essay and I was stuck in the middle of it because I was wondering if I should use from or by in this sentence: 'Incapable to detect that his own circumstances are created by/from his ...
1
vote
1answer
174 views

What does “yeah” mean in American? [closed]

Often I talk with people and they say "yeah". What do they mean? I'm only in USA recently and everyone says "yeah". I gather it means "yes", but I also hear "yeah" when it doesn't mean "yes"?
3
votes
3answers
80 views

What is the word - A secret that passes on from a person to person

I forgot this word. I tell a person a secret and ask him not to tell it to anyone else. That 2nd person tells another person and tells him not to disclose it to anyone else. But this goes on. ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

speech balloon vs speech bubble usage and meaning

I am from the UK, and am not familiar with the term "speech balloon". I have always used and heard "speech bubble" instead. Are the 2 meanings the same? Is there some kind of difference in ...
0
votes
0answers
63 views

What does “Sorry, that didn't make sense” mean? [migrated]

What is the meaning of the phrase Sorry, that didn't make sense? When I apologized to someone, she said that to me.
1
vote
2answers
47 views

In search of a word: Contingent but without fail

I'm in search of a certain word which I cannot find in the dictionary or the internet, but I found something like it. The word is contingent. con·tin·gent (kn-tnjnt) adj. Liable to ...
0
votes
2answers
83 views

Compelled and compeled - American English

As for the British English it's always taught - compel, compelled, compelling Some of the books/dictionaries say that in American English you say compel, compeled, compeling instead, you simply don't ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

What would be 1850's equivalent of slang praise for being audacious?

What might an 1850's working class American man say as praise to another man for being really audacious such as equivalent of "You crazy mf" or "crazy ass"?
3
votes
2answers
75 views

Geographical Usage of “Mate”

I was wondering where the term, "mate," is most popular? When I think of the term, "mate," I think of Australia and England, but I was wondering if anyone else has some input on this. Mate here is ...
12
votes
5answers
2k views

“to bath” vs “to bathe”

Recently, I came across the verb to bathe written as bath in two Italian textbooks. The first time I saw it, I dismissed it as a typographical error and told my private student that the verb was ...
0
votes
2answers
71 views

“Pretty good” vs. “pretty bad”

What is the difference between using "pretty bad" and "pretty good" in this kind of slang context? It seems to be more of an American English quirk. Looks like you hurt your leg pretty bad ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

Is the use of the word 'hence' improper in business writing?

I'm a professional technical writer. I used the word 'hence' in my conclusions a couple of times. The client (from Canada) let me know that it sounds like something straight out of a "Shakespeare ...
2
votes
2answers
103 views

Is “targetted” a standard British English spelling?

Wiktionary says that the difference between "targetting" and "targeting" is that the first one is a British spelling and the second one is American. Meanwhile, Oxford Dictionaries says that ...
2
votes
1answer
163 views

Declension is a noun. What is the verb? [closed]

Based on Wikipedia article, in linguistics, declension is the inflection of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and articles to indicate number (at least singular and plural), case (nominative or subjective, ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Point of difficulty in how punctuation should be handled in and around quotations relating to software logging statements

I sent an e-mail to somebody in the office this morning that had to do with some logging statements in our software, and I wasn't quite sure how to handle commas and such around the quotation marks. ...
3
votes
3answers
159 views

Why is it always women and not men in: “Soccer mom,” “Tiger mom,” “Helicopter mom,” “Wal-Mart mom,” and “Security mom”?

In connection with my question about the meaning and currency of “Security mom,” I was drawn to the fact that all the following labels; “Soccer mom,” “Wal-Mart mom,” “Security mom” are combined with ...
0
votes
3answers
69 views

Meaning of “exactly” in casual conversation

My question involves a group text conversation between friends whom are all native english speakers. Friend A began the conversation with a photograph of himself dressed up for a night on the town, ...
17
votes
3answers
587 views

The origins and usages of “waffle”

Scottish dogs used to waff American voters waffled in 2000 British politicians “waffle on” for hours And Swedish children eat them on March 25th Waffle nowadays has basically three meanings: ...
1
vote
2answers
93 views

what is the opposite of cynical? [closed]

How would you describe a person who is the total opposite of cynical? I thought of 'idealistic' or 'straightforward' but they don't seem right.
1
vote
3answers
261 views

Difference between floor and storey

I've read once about "x stories" .. Want to know if there is any difference between storey and floors. Or they are just alias for each other used in difference variations of english language ?
1
vote
0answers
50 views

the way to use dictionary [closed]

I'm a non-native learner,for good measure,and Im a Chinese.I tufn to the American Heritage Student Dictionary while I want to have a better understanding about words in sentence.And the confusion ...
0
votes
3answers
46 views

Act practice test, need help understanding why I'm wrong

Two different types kayaks are being compared. A new paragraph is started to compare their equipment. The first sentence says. "Equipment for both types of kayaks are similar, and fairly simple." ...
3
votes
1answer
72 views

What is the meaning of the name “Wilber” in English? [closed]

I'm thinking of picking Wilber as my English given name recently, since it has similar pronunciation with my Chinese given name. But I'm not sure about the meaning of Wilber in English, especially ...
2
votes
2answers
54 views

Triple Commas not acceptable?

I'm wondering why this phrasing: I spend most days thinking about the future. Hoping that I'm on the right path, I do my best at everything I can. is preferred over this one: I spend most ...
1
vote
6answers
104 views

Is “evidence” as a verb an Americanism?

We need to evidence the agreement with these forms. Is this usage predominantly American?
2
votes
2answers
118 views

“Theater” vs. “Theatre” in American English

Why is it that "theater" and "theatre" do not follow the traditional rules of British and American spelling? British spellings like "metre" and "centre" are consistently switched to "meter" and ...