This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
1answer
16 views

Where did the term “Square Meal” come from?

In several older TV shows (think Andy Griffith) I've heard the term "Square Meal" used to describe an ideal hardy and nutritious meal. The term can be applied to breakfast, lunch and dinner. Where ...
0
votes
2answers
43 views

Is “I shut up” proper english grammar

So I saw that "shutted" isn't an English word, but "I shut up" doesn't sound proper. If you were to tell someone "I shut up", talking in past tense, would that be proper?
0
votes
1answer
45 views

What does You play to pay mean? Thanks.

Actually it's from comedy, Weird loners. What does You play to pay mean? Thanks. Text from phone : Where's my money ? I know where you live. You play to pay ! 1K tomorrow. In case you can't ...
1
vote
3answers
113 views

What does you are getting reamed mean? [on hold]

Ms C is accusing Ms Z of eating the cheese that Ms C bought. Ms C and Ms Z are room mates. Ms C sees a therapist about it. Ms Z: I don't eat that kind of cheese. Ms C: You do eat that kind ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

You're at a restaurant waiting for a table. People leave a table, now can you say “a table just became free”? [migrated]

You're at a restaurant waiting for a table. People leave a table, now can you say "a table just became free"? or "a table just became available"? or something else? What's the most common/natural way ...
3
votes
5answers
491 views

Expression for becoming homeless, which has the word 'street' in it? How about “pushed to the streets”?

If I lost all my money and became homeless, what standard expression can I use which has the word 'street'? Would it sound perfectly okay to a native English speaker if I said "I was pushed to the ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Way to stick it to

I am watching American comedy, Weird Loners. Mr A is on the phone and talking with headhunter. Mr. A: Jerry (headhunter), come on. I love the salary but these benefits are crap. You call me back ...
2
votes
2answers
56 views

Pronunciation of diphthongs in English

I found a few similar questions, but none of them gave me the answer to this. I'm a native Serbian, so I have problems understanding diphtongs, because Serbian has none of them. Serbian has only five ...
-1
votes
1answer
19 views

Which verb form goes with “sweat”? [closed]

I just love the way the sweat glistens off your back in the sun I just love the way the sweat glisten off your back in the sun
0
votes
1answer
37 views

What does “I really cleaned out the place” mean?

In the comedy Weird Loners there is an exchange, You guys eat up, that's plenty. I really cleaned out the place. What does it mean?
-1
votes
0answers
27 views

pineapple technology company name [closed]

brand name for technology company? Hello I need your help Am starting a technology company and thinking about simple name so I like pineapple 😄 But I can't regester pineapple only so I need word ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Word Stress Within the Phrase I'm expecting someone

I tried pronouncing the phrase: "I'm expecting someone". Phonetically it looks like: [aɪm ɪkspɛkt ɪŋ sʌmwʌn] I perceive some stress on the second syllable of expecting and the first syllable of ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

What do “Bitches get stuff done“ and ”Bitch is the new black” mean?

There was the following passage in Maureen Dowd’s article in New York Times’ (April 18) criticizing Hillary Clinton of overcorrecting her self-image in the current presidential campaign under the ...
-1
votes
1answer
33 views

Can 'Dupe' be used as a verb instead of 'Duplicate'?

I've seen this only in one scenario, 4 players on 2 teams are choosing which type of car they will use, and when both players on the same team choose the same car, player 1 says to player 2, 'Stop ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Pronunciation of Who is it?

I heard the question "Who is it?" in a movie. [Person A] knocked on a door. [Person B] came to open the door, but before that he asks "Who is it?" This three syllables question can be pronounced ...
1
vote
1answer
18 views

Is it correct to use is+past-tense in this sentence? [closed]

Is it grammatically and correct to use is + the past tense (recognized) in this sentence? Is recognized as the most outstanding TVET school in Calamba, Misamis Occidental.
-1
votes
0answers
24 views

A different way to learn English [closed]

I look for a creative way to learn English ... I love writing, I love talking and I believe that you can learn by reading books, watching movies, singing beautiful songs ... anyone agree with me?
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Stress and intonation in “I'm proud of you”

When I pronounce the phrase: "I'm proud of you" to communicate that I'm proud of the person I'm talking to, do I only need to stress the word "proud" a bit? I think that stressing the pronouns "I" ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

“data on my iPad” or “data in my iPad” [duplicate]

Which is correct and are there any differences in meaning or nuance? I have the data on my iPad I have the data in my iPad I searched data on my iPad and data in my iPad on google, and got many ...
3
votes
2answers
565 views

Can I use 'better still' in negative sentences?

Can I use 'better still' in a negative sentence? I'm especially interested in American English usage. Does it sound natural to say: You may not have the access to a trusted counselling, or better ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

What do these two figures of speech mean? Embrace the grind and lower your shoulder

I came across these two figures of speech:(a) Embrace the grind and (b) Lower your shoulder in one of the Instagram posts of Dwayne Johnson(The Rock) Since I am not a native English speaker I just ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Words with primary and secondary stress in a phrase

In the phrase "I'm in the same situation" the word "situation" phonetically looks like: [ˌsɪtʃ uˈeɪ ʃən] The first syllable of the word has secondary stress and the third syllable has primary ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

The NG sound in casual American speech

I read somewhere (I don't remember the source and I'm not sure if it's true) that Americans tend to replace the "ng" sound with only "n" in casual/fast speech. For example: Who's calling? sounds like ...
6
votes
4answers
161 views

We might have to do some “fiddling”

I like the word fiddle, and I quite like the musical instrument too. If you're fiddling with a device, it means you're trying to repair it. It might be tricky because of all the tiny bits and pieces ...
5
votes
2answers
862 views

Is it acceptable in American English to pronounce “grocery” as “groshery”?

I caught myself pronouncing the "c" in "grocery" as an "sh" sound. Is this commonplace/accepted, or is it perhaps geographic? Does this occur with "c" in other words? As background, I was raised in ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Which one is better (or correct) expression? “go up 5 percent'” or “go up by 5 percent” [duplicate]

I ran into some curiosity on some expression just like, A) It took me a day to go up 5 percent. B) It took me a day to go up by 5 percent. I think the B is right, but someone is sometimes using the ...
2
votes
3answers
72 views

What is an alternative way to say “Note that” in academic writing? [closed]

In my academic writing, when I want to connect the context and emphasize something, I almost always use a sentence structure like this: Note that... An example in an academic paper is given ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

'Spelled' vs 'Spelt' [duplicate]

May I just say, I was born and raised in the United States and I use the term "spelt" but others say it should be "spelled" but... why is spelt apparently a grammatical error?
0
votes
1answer
51 views

What is the double opposite of Schadenfreude? [duplicate]

If schadenfreude means "pleasure derived by someone from another person's misfortune", is there a word to call someone who can't feel happy when something good/exciting happens to a ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Word Stress in “It's up to you”

I watched a video on Youtube about the pronunciation of the phrase "It's up to you": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaZrkhCqWbk and it says that "up" is the stressed word. I think that "It's" can ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

Word for reluctance or caution as a result of having already failed?

I'm seeking a word or phrase that conveys a person's heightened caution or risk aversion regarding a task that stems from prior failure. Something like "gun shy," but perhaps more specific?
0
votes
0answers
42 views

“In the cards”, “on the cards” origin(s)

In another question in EL&U "Positives changes on the cards" — meaning? , it came up that at least one of us AmE speakers had always heard this idiom as "in the cards" and never as "on ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Has the English language changed since 1854? [closed]

I've started reading a book named Walden, published in 1854. I am not a native English speaker, I am Persian, and I want to read this book for two reasons: to improve my English and because I think ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

what is the difference between “XYZ-based company” and “XYZ company”

Question(s) In the following paragraph, if i change Abbott Park, Illinois-based company to Abbott Park, Illinois company will the meaning change? Is there a technical term for -based ? When do we ...
-2
votes
2answers
111 views

Formal way to say “doesn't work”? [closed]

I am writing a paper and I feel as if I need a more formal way of writing "doesn't work". Any thoughts? Thanks :)
1
vote
1answer
49 views

The elision of alveolar plosives

when the phrase "Can't complain" is pronounced [ˈkænt kəmˈpleɪn] I think that the T is dropped in fast speech because of the alveolar plosives. Right? I read that when T comes before these letters: / ...
3
votes
1answer
61 views

TR sound and Word Stress

I read in American accent book that when a "t" is followed by an "r" sound, the "t" changes and becomes an almost "ch" sound. "To create this sound correctly, say "ch" as in chain, but just make the ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Pronunciation of What do you want to do?

When I pronounce the question: "What do you want to do?", I hear some stress on the first syllable of "whaddya" and "wanna" and a bit stronger stress on "do". This is how I pronounce it: ...
1
vote
2answers
35 views

What to write when asked family name? [closed]

If my name is Alfonso (first name) Barrera Ramirez (last name) what would I write when they ask for family name?
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Word Stress in “I have a + noun”

I know that any word can be stressed in a sentence to give it emphasis, but in the following sentences I'm interested in a default unemphatic accent. When I pronounce these phrases: A: I have a ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

Word stress: Sorry to keep you waiting

When I heard the phrase: "Sorry to keep you waiting" [sɔri tə kip jʊ weɪdɪŋ] in an American movie it sounded to me that: Sorry, keep, and waiting are the stressed words. I may be wrong because I'm not ...
3
votes
5answers
170 views

Is “He should be consequenced” an error?

I've been watching The Sopranos recently; a very useful vehicle for picking up American pronunciation and mob slang. In series one, episode seven, Tony Soprano and his wife Carmela are in the school ...
0
votes
2answers
67 views

Word Stress Within a Sentence: Adjectives

I read this in American accent book: "Place full stress on an adjective if it's not followed by a noun. If it is followed by a noun, stress the noun more." For example I have this phrase: Have a ...
3
votes
8answers
634 views

What to call Primary School + High School, but not College

I was creating a web form for a client who requested the highest-grade completed for primary and high school and then college. The original paper form had the following Circle highest grade ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Whom or Who in this sentence: These men, all of WHOM or WHO were well-known, well-respected statesmen, were viewed by their peers [duplicate]

Here's the full sentence: "These men, all of who were well-known, well-respected statesmen, were viewed by their peers and common people alike as great thinkers in their day. I just can't really see ...
2
votes
2answers
177 views

Is “offloading a passenger” idiomatic?

Merriam-Webster and Oxford seem to suggest that we can offload things, not people, yet "offloading a passenger" is quite prevalent in Philippine English. Is it a phrase that somebody from the inner ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

Is there a contraction known as the're?

Recently, one of my relatives started studying the English Language and she came to discuss that the contraction of there are can also be written as the're because that's they way she learnt it at ...
2
votes
3answers
69 views

A person who is super excited for something [closed]

What do we call a person who is super excited for something?
1
vote
2answers
242 views

Word stress in the phrase: I just got here [closed]

I give some context for my question: Question: Have you been waiting long? Answer: I just got here. [aɪ dʒʌst ɡɑt hɪər] When I pronounce the phrase "I just got here" I hear some stress on the word ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Slang word for transferring money from one card to another

Ok, so there is an Online Money Transfer Service. It allows for quick money transfer from one card to another. The advertisement of this service describes how it is convenient for parents to transfer ...