This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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1answer
26 views

What is the antonym of opposite of “times/multiplied” in this case?

One can say that muscle is 3 times more dense than fat. [citation required] What is the term for the opposite? Fat is 3 times less dense than muscle? That doesn't sound quite right. Is there a ...
-1
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2answers
26 views

What does “I feel friendly” mean?

If I want to express the feeling that other people are very friendly to me, what is the proper way to say it? Is it okay to say:"I feel you are very friendly"? Is there any better way to say so? ...
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3answers
47 views

Operating System Concept, A Translation is need? [on hold]

Who can translate the following sentence in a simple manner? Between garbage collections free space will build up, which cannot be reclaimed until the next time the garbage collector runs. This ...
1
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1answer
55 views

Words rhyming with “ear” pronounced with the vowel as in “eat”?

For words like ear, year, hear etc., most dictionaries only give the pronunciation /-ɪr/ (with the vowel as in the word it). But I think some native speakers pronounce them /-ir/ (with the vowel as in ...
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0answers
21 views

Is it correct to say “with less”? [migrated]

When I want to refer to something (which has the least amount of something), Is it correct to say "with less"?, for example, the house with less windows in the town.
3
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3answers
92 views

“trade” for “business deal; transaction” in North American vernacular

Harrap's New Shorter English-French Dictionary, Ed. 1982, states, trade [...] 2. (b) NAm (i) transaction (commerciale); (ii) clientèle f (d'une maison); carriage trade, grosse clientèle. ...
0
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2answers
60 views

One Word : What do you call who chill / relax a lot? [on hold]

I need one word for people who chill / party / relax / play games / travel and just chill most of the time. Some Word like 'Freizeit' , but it needs to be used as a noun for persons (eg, traveller, a ...
12
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2answers
1k views

Is “chaperon” versus “chaperone” a US versus British English thing?

I've noticed that "chaperone" can also be spelt "chaperon", without the "e" at the end. Is this a case of American English simplifying a British English word, or something else? The original French ...
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0answers
21 views

how while usage in this sentence written below which is asked in amcat 2015 [closed]

Can i know how while used in in this context. He is better acquainted with the place ____ I am . (a) which (b) that (c) while (d) than ANS:(C)
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1answer
41 views

Help rewrite my mission statement [closed]

We believe in: • Enhacing hiking oportunities by to exploring new trails and diverse ecosystems • Preserving hiking trails throught sharing our passion and knowledge • Hiking trails are our ...
0
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0answers
50 views

I wouldn't vs I'd not

I'm defending my word choice to an editor in a novel I've written. There are two points of view: one is a native Irish speaker, and the other, an American born and raised here. They're both eighteen. ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

“available (availability)” vs. “valid (validity)” for “having sufficient power or efficacy” in AmEng vernacular

Per Random House Webster's College Dictionary, Ed. 1991, available suitable or ready for use; of use or service; at hand: I used whatever tools were available. readily obtainable; ...
2
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0answers
39 views

What is the difference between “look into” and “look at” when used in figurative meaning? [on hold]

Thank you for sending me the introduction of your company. We will "look into"/"look at" it later. What is the difference between "look into" and "look at" when used with a figurative meaning ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

They don't like I spend time alone vs they don't like me spending time alone

"They don't like I spend time alone" I'm not a native speaker but I found this sentence written by non-native speaker kind of awkward and I'm wondering if this sentence is natural or grammatically ...
0
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0answers
38 views

'Wasn't dressed' vs 'Didn't dress'

I was wondering what is the difference between : She didn't dress properly to the live performance. and She wasn't dressed properly to the live performance. If it's completely identical ...
0
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0answers
20 views

English Grammar [migrated]

I have a sentence: "We are having a party this evening" I don't know why we use present continuous. In grammar, we don't use having for possess. Thank you for reading
0
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1answer
41 views

Can I use meet for an online meeting?

I would like to know if I can say "We can meet on Monday or Tuesday" in email as a reply to a sales person's email asking for a couple of days options for an online meeting -- a sort of Skype call. I ...
3
votes
2answers
66 views

what is the meaning of “pro-rate”? [closed]

What does "pro-rate" in following sentence mean? We pro-rate our prices if you join after a session has started does it mean that they reduce the price if I want to enroll after a session has ...
7
votes
2answers
704 views

Nylon bag vs plastic bag

I was buying some carry out and I asked for a nylon bag. The cashier, who is not a native speaker, gave me a look and offered a 'plastic bag', which is what I wanted to begin with. I don't know why I ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

The meaning of “play off” here

"While playing off the hype of the TV show reboot "The X-files," the CIA broke down the cases into two categories, whether you side with Agent Mulder or Agent Scully." I'm studying English and I ...
6
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0answers
229 views

“Alcohôlic” vs. “melanchŏlic,” “sôlvent” vs. “sŏlute.” What source describes this change?

According to Merriam-Webster, the pronunciation of alcoholic is "ˌal-kə-ˈhȯ-lik, -ˈhä-" while the pronunciation of melancholic is "ˌme-lən-ˈkä-lik." OK, the title is an exaggeration: they can rhyme ...
0
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0answers
31 views

Does a group have an earache or earaches?

If I have a pain in my ear, I will say "I have an earache." Now what happens if I am talking about more than one person? Would I say "They have an earache", or "They have earaches"?
5
votes
5answers
92 views

What's the more common way to refer to a road with 180° curves?

A hairpin road is a road with hairpin turns or bends. According to Wikipedia: A hairpin bend , named for its resemblance to a hairpin/bobby pin, is a bend in a road with a very acute ...
3
votes
5answers
325 views

Ambiguous meaning of NAmEng sense of “skill” in Harrap's English-French Dictionary

Harrap's New Shorter English-French/French-English Dictionary, Ed. 1982, states, skill n 1. habileté f, adresse f, dextérité f; technical skill, habileté, aptitude f, technique; ...
3
votes
2answers
104 views

“[ball]park” in AmEng vernacular

Are the terms ballpark and park specific to baseball in AmEng, or can they also be used for every which athletic stadium in which ball games like soccer or rugby are played? For example, would a ...
1
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3answers
87 views

“crash” vs. “wreck” for [road/air] accident in AmEng

What's the difference between those terms in relation to a road or air accident? crash verb (Aeronautics) to cause (an aircraft) to hit land or water violently resulting in severe damage ...
2
votes
3answers
73 views

“road” vs. “pavement” vs. “roadway” for French “chaussée” [road surface] in AmEng vernacular

What's the difference between those terms? Can they be used just about interchangeably? road: a long, narrow stretch with a leveled or paved surface, made for traveling by motor vehicle, carriage, ...
0
votes
4answers
106 views

more unhealthy vs. unhealthier

First off, I'm not a native speaker but this question isn't about the rules themselves but rather usage in the USA. I learnt that you should say 'unhealthier' (and the Oxford + Longman dictionaries I ...
1
vote
1answer
20 views

Using For+noun, in conversations

I'm currently studying English in the US and I heard a lot of people start sentences with 'for~'. For me, it sounds like it means 'as for' or 'when it comes to'. Is that right? If so, is it common ...
4
votes
4answers
35 views

term or phrase representing a placeholder or variable

How can I express in standard American English that events occur "every X days" or end "after X occurrences" — here, "X" is a placeholder for a variable and unknown quantity — without ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

“All-American” … which usage came first?

In the U.S., "All-American" can mean two things. (1) It can be used as a general phrase, meaning simply clean-cut and middle class. "He's the all-American boy" is a cliché sentence. Note, this usage ...
9
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3answers
104 views

What is the etymology of the term “form factor”?

I'm a theoretical physicist, and am doing some work on quantities called form factors. To an expert, a form factor says something about scattering particles from fields. This probably originated from ...
2
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3answers
40 views

Who or What for question about statement

For the statement: "Obama is the president of the United States." Which of these questions is considered the most correct? Who is Obama? What is Obama? Basically, my question revolves ...
1
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1answer
46 views

“tab” for “hotel bill” in AmEng

In AmEng vernacular, is the word tab specific to restaurant and bar checks, or can it also be used for hotel bills? E.g. Guest: We'll be checking out early tomorrow morning, so if it isn't too ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

What are the levels of proficiency in english and the vocubulary subsets at each level [closed]

What are the levels of proficiency in english and the vocubulary subsets at each level. As in how many words should a person know at each level of english proficiency and is there a reference list of ...
0
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1answer
28 views

What does “within greater [region]” mean? [closed]

If someone says something such as "Within greater Seattle", what does that mean?
5
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2answers
256 views

Old, experienced soldier in US slang

In British slang, an "old sweat" is an old, experienced soldier. What is the American equivalent? I don't mean a veteran (someone who's left the military), I mean someone still in service.
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4answers
217 views

“[a/the] equivalent of” vs. “[a/the] equivalent for” vs. “[a/the] equivalent to”

Which of the following constructs sound more idiomatic to you? Is there any British/American equivalent to the French phrase "broyer du noir"? Is there any British/American equivalent for the ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Whence the BrE “fine tooth-comb” where AmE uses “fine-tooth comb”?

I'm reading a novel set in present-day England, and it's sprinkled with uses of the construction in the title. This is far from the first time I've encountered this in BrE writing, along with general ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Which English language groups/cultures would say “I'm going to bed now” while they were already in a bed?

I was reading a discussion on another part of the internet and many of the people involved asserted that it was common to use the phrase "go to bed" for "cease all other activity and go to sleep" even ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

he got nothing on me. what does this phrase mean?

hi i was listening a song by charlie Puth and he says Superman got nothing on me . what does it mean? thanks
2
votes
1answer
65 views

Using “so isn't” or “so can't” instead of “so is” or “so can”?

Lately I've heard people using what I think to be a negative response to indicate a positive affirmation, like so: Example 1 You can touch the basketball rim? Well so can't I! Example 2 Person A: ...
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votes
3answers
41 views

Is this headline concise and clear enough? [closed]

I want to say it like im 5. Essentially, where a 5 year old could be able to comprehend the message. I tried to simplify this line, but I feel it's still a bit complicated. Making deliveries ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

What “appear to be ” means in the given sentence [closed]

Today, while reading a newspaper I came across a sentence that has been baffling me since: The woman, who identified herself as Bhavna and appeared to be in her 20s, .... What does appeared to ...
31
votes
8answers
10k views

When talking to American clients, should I say “smoothie” or “milkshake”?

We have a client visit planned to our service center (in India) and I am in-charge of Food and Beverages for our client's entire itinerary. I am writing to my client's Travel coordinator(an American) ...
4
votes
2answers
93 views

When did “the pub in Bleecker Street” become “the pub on Bleecker Street”?

In the streets is still used universally. As is out in the street. The casual fan of Sir Arthur's writings will recall, of course, that Mr. Holmes and Dr. Watson lived in Baker Street: ...while ...
4
votes
15answers
816 views

Opposite idiom for going with the flow

According to the Cambridge dictionary, going with the flow is defined as to do what other ​people are doing or to ​agree with other ​people because it is the ​easiest thing to do. I am writing a paper ...
5
votes
2answers
213 views

“The government 'is' always changing 'their' mind” in AmEng

Why would using the construct "is/their" instead of "is/its" in the following examples likely be frowned upon by some native speakers and marked as incorrect on tests? The class is working on its ...
-1
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1answer
30 views

Does this sentence read nice and fluent? [closed]

I bravely overcame the difficulties and succeeded to make my life full of notable accomplishments which include my excellent GPA of 3.98/4 in B.Sc. studies and years of successful academic and work ...
-1
votes
1answer
59 views

English pronunciation of the letter “a” [closed]

I heard the letter a was pronounced /ei/, and sometimes it was pronounced as /ə/. So, can you tell me when is it pronounced as /ei/, and when as /ə/?