This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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5
votes
2answers
209 views

What did “eating 'mad cow'” mean in the 1800's?

In the December 1885 Lippincott's Magazine article COOKHAM DEAN, about an artistic area 40 miles up the Thames from London, Margaret Bertha Wright (an American author) wrote: Probably nine-tenths ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

“He would go to the theater if I would go with him” - is this a correct sentence?

How to say properly in American English this sentence: "He would go to the theater if I would go with him". Does it look absolutely fine? First of all, I'm curious about two "would" in one sentence.
2
votes
1answer
57 views

What does “telling the truth has become a societal antiquity” mean?

What does "telling the truth has become a societal antiquity" mean? I saw it on a random post earlier today. I guess it could mean that it's an outdated method: that many people resort to lies.
1
vote
1answer
34 views

already , southern pronunciation ≈ [ʰɑɾi] “oddy”

Cut to the chase pals Could anybody confirm the southern pronunciation of "already" as something like oddy ? if so, What's its phonetic transcription? is there any eye spelling for it? I've noticed ...
-3
votes
0answers
27 views

Correctness of the sentence [on hold]

This is one question I would really like to know the answer to.
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Associates vs employees

I've noted that some US companies (I've seen that in less-than-stellar retail and fast-food chains) call people working for them "associates", rather than "employees". What would be the difference ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

When saying 'perhaps' and not 'maybe' [closed]

This previous answer to a similar question appears important for my question. People annoy me by often writing like "Perhaps my hypothesis is true." and not "Maybe my hypothesis is true." When I read ...
-2
votes
0answers
33 views

Until came the day [on hold]

Until came the day when I discovered nano technology, I perceived this state of the art technology as a breakthrough. Is the expression "until came the day" correct?
-3
votes
1answer
56 views

What exactly does “Standard” refer to in “(U.S.) Standard System”? [on hold]

Why do Americans refer to the US imperial system of measurement as the standard system? In addition to the fact that the metric system is widely accepted as the standard system, the alternate term, ...
5
votes
2answers
182 views

19th century American English “slang”?

As I was doing a bit of research online I stumbled on this Children's Corner page 311 from the American Farmers' Magazine 1858. And, frankly, there are a lot of words that look totally foreign to me. ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

“Sport” vs “Sports” Origin

I was recently reading this article on the use of "math" vs. "maths" as a collective noun (Americans use the former, Brits the latter). However, the trend seen in "math/maths" is reversed in ...
-2
votes
1answer
37 views

Is “originally first” a grammar error?

I understand that the phrase "originally first" is repetitive, but is it a grammatical error? For more context, the phrase appeared in the following sentence which was marked wrong for repetition. ...
1
vote
2answers
29 views

What's the word or phrase for “reading strategy/orientation”?

In English, we read from left-to-right, top-to-bottom. In traditional Japanese, text is read up-todown, right-to-left. Is there an English word that describes the "reading strategy" of a particular ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Asking an investor if he received the email that contains our business plan [closed]

What is the best formal sentence in English to ask an investor if he received the email or not? I will send it using Facebook chat. I want to confirm that the mail is received successfully or not. The ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

what does this mean “ I got 70 + application forms” [duplicate]

Today I saw, someone has written I got 70+ application forms What is the purpose of the plus sign in that statement?
-1
votes
1answer
81 views

no more feed the children commercials (and so on) [closed]

No more feed the children commercials. With 40 million over weight americans negros to eat, the african cannibals would have food for years I don't understand causality or a causal relationship ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

I'm writing an email to an investor. Please help me to improve my sentences [closed]

I am sending a detailed document about our idea, as requested by an investor. Are the sentences correct? Do they need any improvement? As per our conversation yesterday, I am sending you a ...
-1
votes
3answers
94 views

If Americans go to the toilet in the bathroom, where do they take a bath?

As far as I am aware, in the US it is very common to refer to the room that contains the toilet (device for disposing of human waste) as the bathroom. If this is a separate room from the room that ...
-2
votes
1answer
77 views

Difference between “I've got a cold” and “I've gotten a cold” in American English [duplicate]

I once heard there is a difference in meaning between these two sentences in AmE. Is there any? The possible duplicate Difference between "I have got" and "I have gotten" does not ...
11
votes
2answers
1k views

'Grasshopper' as a term for a neophyte

What is the origin of using the word "grasshopper" as a term for a neophyte or trainee? The most reliable reference I have is Urban Dictionary, who claims that it is from a 1970's television series ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Where and how do I use the word “apparently”?

Does this word "apparently" mean that something is obvious or does it refer to something that seems true but actually isn't. Apparent means illusion, right? People use this word quite often and I ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Using a name as a contraction with “is”, syntax looks possessive?

"Bob is fat" Would it be proper to do "Bob's fat"? To me, this looks possessive, as if we're talking about his fat rather than using "fat" as an adjective. What's the proper way to do this?
3
votes
3answers
320 views

Water caltrop in American English

There's a moderately popular fruit found in India known as panifal or singada in Hindi. The fruit comes from an aquatic plant that grows in stagnant or slow-moving water up to 10-15 foot deep. Here's ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Which organizations responsible for formalizing English Language (British and American) [duplicate]

I need this information to make my own English language site, but I do not want to use copy-paste from other sites or books. I need to find the source of information to make a correct content. If ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

How should I arrange a foreign word and its translation in middle of sentence?

I'm having trouble with this sentence: "I possess what in spanish we call ganas, the desire, to attain a graduate degree." I think it's clear what I'm trying to say, but it sounds wrong. It ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

Why does Northern Ireland pronunciation sound similar to American?

Recently, I started watching a TV show The Fall, which takes place in Northern Ireland. Their intonations and accents are unique, but their pronunciation sounds a lot like North American English to ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

What do “doe” and “save us the conversation” mean? [closed]

First, I wanna ask the meaning of the word "doe". Is it like "buddy" or "pal"? Seems it has lots of meanings. Second, I wanna ask the meaning of the sentence that saves us the conversation. ...
7
votes
1answer
70 views

What Charles Ingalls was really going to say?

Here is full paragraph: Pa was on top of the walls, stretching the canvas wagon-top over the skeleton roof of saplings. The canvas billowed in the wind, Pa's beard blew wildly and his hair stood ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

“waiter” vs “server”

Are they really the same in every respect? What are the differences if any? In India, they're always called waiter regardless of the size and exclusivity of the establishment. Is it the same in the ...
2
votes
2answers
81 views

Is the phrase “Hello, my dear fellow” considered weird nowadays?

I was wondering if the "Hello, my dear fellow" salutation is considered weird nowadays. A friend of mine (one British chap) once said it sounded "gay" =) I'd like to ask native speakers' opinion. ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Why to choose or Why choose? [duplicate]

I'm not a native English speaker so I need your help on this one. When talking about a company, which one is correct: 1)Why to choose Google 2)Why choose Google? For a non native speaker...why to ...
2
votes
2answers
57 views

American words for gas stoves

Please take a look at the following two images: In India, it's customary to refer to the thing in the first image as a "gas stove" and the second as a"cooking range" or "hob." Is it the same in ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Meaning of “tea party”

Of late I've noticed that this phrase seems to be tossed around all the time especially in the context of political discussions. What does it exactly mean? For example, take a look at the following ...
7
votes
5answers
3k views

What are these vehicles called in the United States?

I understand the names for various types of cars in the US as well as elsewhere, such as hatchback, sedan, SUV, etc. However there are two classes of vehicles that don't seem to fall under any of ...
-1
votes
2answers
96 views

What does “Booting these guys” mean? [closed]

I am not native English speaker, but in a conversation with an American guy, I come across this line. I am adding the situation where that guy used this sentence. He gave me some things to do, I did ...
2
votes
3answers
93 views

Adrenaline vs epinephrine

I just stumbled upon a blog that states that epinephrine is the American name for adrenaline. Is it true? If so, how prevalent is this Americanism within America? And do they prefer epinephrine in ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Which Sentence Does Not Belong Here? [closed]

I am trying to figure out the sentence that does not belong to this paragraph. The researchers developed three criteria for the test subjects. The test subjects needed to be women because the drug ...
5
votes
4answers
188 views

Can “barge in” be used as an informal and quirky way of saying “come in” and “come on in”?

I am looking for a specific US expression. An informal way of saying "all right, come on in" to a very good friend in a situations as follows: The (drunk) friend who is barging into my suit suite ...
2
votes
1answer
124 views

Are there any famous English poems that every British-raised or American-raised person knows? [closed]

In the Chinese language, there is a poem named Quiet Night Thoughts(Jing Ye Si) by Li Bai, which is known by everyone that is native to China (from little kids to very old people, even if they are ...
-1
votes
0answers
27 views

Use of final “s” in -word endings: which words in AmE are correct?

DFW said [0]: The preposition towards is British usage; the US spelling is toward ... Except for backwards and afterwards, no preposition ending in –word takes a final s in US usage." Is that ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

“Know the way over”

You tell someone that, if a disaster happen at your place, you're going to go to his/her place (kidding). They reply: "I am glad you still know the way over". What does this mean?
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Need vs. Needs? [duplicate]

I heard a person on television say the following... "Pittsburgh need to win this game." To me, this sounds incorrect. I think it should be "needs to." If however, the announcer had said... ...
0
votes
4answers
51 views

A word to describe a person who is in top/winning bracket of a competitive game

I am looking for a word that would describe a player who is, for example, in a TOP 10 chart and is eligible for a prize. That means that if he would suddenly lose his/her position and get ranked 11 or ...
2
votes
1answer
307 views

The lost English dictionary

There is an old dictionary of the English language where words are defined from a pessimistic/skeptical/sadistic perspective. I seem to have lost the link to that dictionary in my bookmarks. I wonder ...
-1
votes
3answers
41 views

need confirmation or needs confirmation

I receive an issue reported in an issue tracker. That issue requires confirmation to check if it is a real issue. How should the label be names as: Need confirmation or Needs confirmation?
-2
votes
3answers
57 views

Lookig for a better/stronger sentence [closed]

Could anybody let me know a stronger/improved sentence for the one shown below: One of my interest is in applying machine learning to real world problems
0
votes
1answer
117 views

What does “Way to read the room” mean?

I'm translating a movie and there's one sentence I could not understand. In the movie a doctor tells his friend: Doctor: Find something sharp to penetrate his skull.(to help the patient). ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

'parameterized' or 'parametrized' [duplicate]

In the following sentence: To avoid the attacks, most frameworks and DB systems provide mechanism for parameterized queries. My browser wants to correct the highlighted word to parametrized, but ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

What mind stands for [closed]

The difinition of mind that parts of individual feels, perceives, thinks, wills, and especially reasons is a common presence in dictionaries,however,what it stand for?Brain?
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Where in the U.S. do people change the stress of umbrella, adult and TV to the first syllable?

Is it just a small percentage of the population in that region who stress the first syllable, or is it widespread? In other words, if I visit such region will I find almost everyone talking like that ...