This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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0answers
27 views

what is the word for 'a group of literate intellectuals suffering with problem e.g. job"? [on hold]

what could be the word to refer/describe 'a group of literate intellectuals suffering with some problem" ..right now I can think of 'not getting the job'. thanks
0
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1answer
27 views

In a professional environment, what is a preferable statement to: “I haven't had the time to do it”

Seeking a statement that is similar – or more precise – in meaning, but casts a less negative perception upon the speaker. Example: Employee A: 'What is the status on Project X?' Employee B: 'I ...
-1
votes
1answer
42 views

Use of 'z' versus 's' [duplicate]

I've been brought up believing that most of the words that have suffix with '-ize' or '-ized' is the American English form and the British English forms use (most of the time) '-ise' or '-ised' as the ...
-5
votes
3answers
71 views

Antonym for the word “Engineering”

"Engineering" is the word used for construction or creation (if I am not wrong). Searching in thesaurus to find the antonym. Suggestions please.. To explain in detail... My query is, I need to ...
1
vote
2answers
88 views

Whatever tickles their fancy in the US?

The delightful-sounding tickle your fancy is, I think, one of those rare idioms where the word order can be reversed and its meaning changes; the request: fancy a tickle? said with a raised eyebrow ...
5
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3answers
444 views

Colors = Crayons?

I always considered the word "colors" as synonymous with the word "crayons," e.g. "the teacher asked her students to take out their colors" would mean "the teacher asked her students to take out their ...
0
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2answers
42 views

How do we respond to tag question after urgings starting with 'Let's'?

There is a question bothering me. It is about an acceptable response to a tag question following Let's ... The following example is from English Club: A: "Let's go, shall we?" B: "________." ...
-1
votes
1answer
61 views

Is 'gotten' a proper/legitimate word?

According to what I was taught as school, the past tense of 'get' is 'got' and 'gotten' is "an American corruption and, therefore, is not a proper word". Example: "Should auld acquaintance be ...
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2answers
48 views

Is it “in the episode” or “on the episode”? [on hold]

Which one is correct "in the episode" or "on the episode"? If I talk about a specific episode do I have to use "on" like "on episode 40"? Is that correct?
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Are proper adverbs falling out of usage in current spoken American English?

While watching American movies and TV series, I notice that in dialogue very often the usage of a proper adverb is replaced by the corresponding adjective (in the case where the adverb is formed by ...
2
votes
4answers
40 views

'Fine Results' is fine?

I'm currently working in a slogan and my outcome so far is something like Fine Results, Simple Methods However, by googling "fine results", the search results shows me that there is little to ...
0
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1answer
60 views

Words play - does it have a special name in English? How to do the same with 'security' word for example?

By looking at this picture: Or at the title of this album: You can see that the authors used there something which I call a word game. My question is, does doing so has an official name? How can ...
-1
votes
1answer
30 views

Determiners in English sentence vs. plurals, singulars and zero determiners. Is it ok to say?

Do I need any determiners in the sentence below in general statement? Strong winds destroy homes. Is it ok to say in English in specific situation? The strong wind destroyed the homes in North ...
2
votes
2answers
57 views

Pronunciation of word “considered”

I have learned in school that letter 'r' is not sounded in the word 'considered', here's an example. But I have been watching the 'How I met your mother' series, and Ted have pronounced that with ...
1
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1answer
30 views

“Enjoin” vs “Adjure”

"Enjoin" means to direct someone with emphasis and authority. "Adjure" means to command in a serious manner. Are the two words used in different contexts?
1
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1answer
44 views

Telling the time - Minute 01 to 09 [duplicate]

What would be the most frequent/common way of telling the time when the minute is between 01 and 09? Is there any difference between BE and AmE? 5:03 -> 1) five oh three 2) five three 3) three ...
27
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18answers
7k views

A verb that means “to prove someone is guilty of a crime”

Preface: I don't think there is a single-word (verb) that expresses the concept I am asking for, in which case I'd settle for the least ambiguous and most common phrase or idiom that describes the ...
0
votes
3answers
47 views

Interpreting contemporary literature [closed]

There's something I just don't get of English usage in contemporary literature. Take the following excerpt: I have only to break into the tightness of a strawberry, and I see summer-its dust and ...
0
votes
3answers
103 views

The phrase “more sharp” vs “sharper”

So I was talking to my fiancee and she said "more sharp" to which I said "you mean sharper?". This is in context of talking about her current earrings being "more sharp" then her usual ones. She then ...
1
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4answers
467 views

“I usually knock off at 6”

"I usually knock off at 6", i heard an english gentleman say that. Does it sound odd only to me? In fact, what I heard was "I usually masturbate at 6" Did some research: found a book (i'm guessing ...
0
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5answers
54 views

What does it mean when the beginning of a sentence is 'To Think' (followed by a comma)?

For example, "My name rolled out of his tongue like it laced the abhorrence of a deplorable word. He might consider using to it summon the devil. To think, I hated my last name." I don't understand ...
1
vote
0answers
55 views

What is the antonym to 'elevation'?

How do I say an opposite of "elevation of an object over the plane" which would mean "the level of the displacement of an object under the plane"? That is, I am looking for a word in "??? of an object ...
1
vote
2answers
41 views

Combining two sentences for title

I want to combine the following sentence: Relationship between son and mother, and relationship between daughter and mother Into one sentence for title of an article: Relationship between son, ...
6
votes
1answer
133 views

Influence of Spanish and usage of Spanish words in US English

A recent report by Instituto Cervantes ["El Español una lengua viva, informe 2015"] lists the US as the 4th country in the world with the highest number of native Spanish speakers (41.343.921), ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Hyphenation of a word to a two-word phrase [closed]

How should one treat the hyphenation of a word to a two-word phrase, such as in the example below: something about the qubit-resonator mode frequency detuning. The sentence tries to express: ...
1
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0answers
53 views

“Accessory” pronounced with a stress on the first syllable

I'm a first language English speaker, but grew up Bilingual in Spanish in a Spanish speaking country. Today I was speaking to another first language English speaker (Canadian) and used the word ...
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0answers
30 views

Exceptions to the rule that AAVE can omit “is” and “are” iff the corresponding form in standard English can be contracted?

According to Wikipedia: Only the forms is and are (of which the latter is anyway often replaced by is) can be omitted; am, was, and were are not deleted. These forms cannot be omitted when ...
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0answers
4 views

what is the place of these 2 words “known” and “preserved” in the following sentence? [migrated]

what is the place of these 2 words "known" and "preserved" in the following sentence? The Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc Cave in the Ardèche department of southern France is a cave that contains the earliest ...
2
votes
2answers
101 views

How to use the word “finna” correctly?

I've heard both "I'm finna go to the store" and "He finna go to the store." Do we prefer with "is, am, are", or without? Is it a regional / dialectic difference, or are they interchangeable?
0
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1answer
66 views

Is there any authoritative source from where we can find out if a phrase or figure of speech is American English or British English? [closed]

For example the figure of speech " One swallow doesn't make a summer" is British English. Similarly the figure of speech 'All hat and no cattle" is American English. Is there any source from where ...
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votes
0answers
32 views

In a company name, should you use “An” vs “A” [duplicate]

For example, if a company is being bought out by another company, it sounds right to use "A Comcast Company", but "A Xfinity Company" dosen't fit so well compared to "An Xfinity Company", same goes ...
0
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1answer
45 views

Phrases used to replace“ I think” [closed]

Can anybody suggest phrases or sentences I can use instead of "I think" when it comes to giving opinions Thank you.
4
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1answer
699 views

Does “asking” as a noun have much, say, historic use?

There's a commonplace form in AmE, "as per your asking"... (Note this question by a rightly confused non-native speaker.) It occurred to me that "asking" makes a beautiful noun. (Particularly if ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

What is the correct way to show tiered possession?

When there are multiple places where possession is shown, how are the words structured? A few examples: Greg's son's laptop is on fire. Mary's friends' boat is sinking. Thomas's neighbor's cat ate ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

“She wasn't sleeping eight hours”?

Take a look at this article from the Huffington Post. In it, there is this paragraph right here: Eight hours. This number is spoken like gospel in this country when it comes to sleep. "How much ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

What are lexemes and morphemes? [closed]

I am preparing for my TOEFL test and want to increase my vocabulary. Can anybody please tell me what lexemes and morphemes are, and why they are important? I have Googled the terms but I need the ...
10
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2answers
196 views

How should terminal punctuation work when quoting a Hebrew snippet in English text?

In American English, full stops (periods) and commas are always typeset within quotation marks (that is, before the closing quotation mark). Does this rule still apply when the quoted matter is in a ...
1
vote
2answers
299 views

In what English-speaking communities does “trump” refer to the breaking of wind?

It is clear from this site that the verb to trump has been used extensively across Britain to refer to the breaking of wind. It is especially the case in the North, in Wales and certainly in Norfolk, ...
1
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1answer
37 views

“We are familiar” improvement [closed]

I have this,"We are familiar with the sport activities", sentence but to me it's a bit awkward and I need to improve it a little bit. I need to improve "We are familiar" part, and I am kind of stuck ...
3
votes
3answers
109 views

What word(s) do children of English native speakers use for “kid”/“child”/etc

I'm looking for (a) word(s) that is/are perceived to be child's language by adults, not words used by adults to describe children. What would be fine though are words used by adults when they are ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

What is the differece between “to receiving” and “to receive”?

I am wondering the differece between "to receiving" and "to receive"? I found in many sentences a simple verb or a "ing" after "to". Though I have explore the following, still I am not clear. If the ...
0
votes
2answers
74 views

“That's a mercy!” - Is this some kind of repartee?

I came across the phrase "That's a mercy!" in a textbook dialogue. To put it in context I've reproduced the whole dialogue as below: Bobbie: You look like hell, dad. What's on? Sam: Nothing special. ...
2
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2answers
34 views

Origin of Soccer

What is called football in most of countries, called soccer in US. However, there are some inconsistent usage of these terms. For example, in Australia, they have Football Federation Australia (FFA) ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Meaning of “Green” and “GreenBack” in American english?

I found 2 new words on my American Slang book (Talk the way americans do). 1) Green 2) GreenBack Meaning of these words on my book : Green : money (Referring to the color green seen on U.S. paper ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

She didn't even had me/has me/have me

I'm trying to translate a sentence out of a book, and the author is talking about the past and I'm not sure which one is correct, the sentence goes like this: She was so alone, I was the only one she ...
17
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6answers
2k views

Where does “pizza pie” originate?

The Italianissimo pizza—pronounced /ˈpiʦ:a/—is not always spelled or called pizza around the world: In Bosnia, Belarusian, Macedonia, Serbia it's spelled pica but pronounced /pîtsa/ In ...
1
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1answer
60 views

What does “Come on, let's wrangle up the cattle” mean?

Andy said this to Woody in Toy Story 1. Is this idiom?
0
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2answers
46 views

verb, verb noun - structure

I would like to know the rule of this kind of structure and what is it called if it has a name. Example : others say that the students will take ethics seriously only if it is taught as a separate, ...
0
votes
3answers
71 views

Missing words after commas in these sentences? [closed]

In the following sentence, why did the author use "thinking" after the comma? Is a word omitted after the comma? I waited for two months, thinking that it would be bad time for him. ...
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

Problem in 'talking to a lot of people' [closed]

I told my friend that "I am talking to a lot of people" and he said this sentence is not correct. Can anyone help me find out what's wrong with the following sentence: "Talking to a lot of people"