Topics having to do with multiple meanings of a word or phrase.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
1answer
39 views

What does 'measuring cast' mean? (1660, UK)

Source: 'Things Necessary to be Continually had in Remembrance', by Sir Matthew Hale (1609-1676) If in criminals it be a measuring cast, to incline to mercy and acquittal. How do you ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

“improve upon” another party's design - meaning?

My supervisor in Japan is currently translating my CV from English into Japanese, however she has asked me to reword one sentence (in English) as to her its meaning is not what I intended it to be. ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

class vs. group

So this is what I get from dictionary.com: class: a number of persons or things regarded as forming a group by reason of common attributes, characteristics, qualities, or traits; kind; sort: a ...
-1
votes
1answer
60 views

Ambiguity in this sentence?

Is this sentence ambiguous: Licensor grants licensee one license to install and use this software on as many computers owned and operated by employees of your company That is, who owns the ...
-1
votes
1answer
203 views

Ambiguious anaphora in a speech

On October 31, 2014, President Obama spoke on the topic of women and the economy. Here's a section of the speech. Moms and dads deserve a great place to drop their kids off every day that ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

The relationship between and correct usage of the words Chronometry and Horology

Wikipedia for 'Chronometry' states: Chronometry applies to electronic devices, while Horology refers to mechanical devices. While on 'Horology', Wikipedia describes it in more detail, creating ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

The meaning of “pure” vs “clear”

So I'd like to express the "clearness" (in sense of elegance) of some spatial shapes (BTW not sure about this phrase, probably "spatial forms" is more correct). I'm going to use either "pure" or ...
1
vote
0answers
117 views

I wonder if _____ will show up at the meeting?

I wonder if _____ will show up at the meeting? a. someone b. anyone c. one d. everyone I know the answer isn't someone or one. I'm more confused between the other two ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

did not think he would steal some

a. I did not think he would steal some of my ideas. b. I did not think he would steal certain of my ideas. Could these sentences have two meanings: I did not think he would steal any of my ideas. ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Unnamed vs Nameless

I've scouted around and found that: Unnamed defined is "not having being given a name" Nameless defined is "not having a name / unknown as to what the name is My main question is what is the term ...
0
votes
0answers
57 views

Roboticist v.s. Robotician

I am wondering about the right word to explain the people, are who involved in the robotics realm. I've seen both Roboticist and Robotician within the technical literature. But I have no idea about ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

How would one specify that Noun 2 in “[Prepositional phrase] [Noun 1] and [Noun 2]” is not an object of the prepositional phrase?

I will give an example of this problem. In fact, this example is the reason why I am asking! I am blending a quote taken from a book into an assignment on which I am currently working. (Don't worry, I ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Should less be repeated to clarify it applies to a series?

For a sentence like this: That setting results in a less firm and stable surface. Is it clear that less applies to both firm and stable or should it be repeated to avoid ambiguity between the ...
0
votes
0answers
79 views

Enlighten the difference between phrasal verb and the verb followed by a preposition

I can't help getting confused! Though the question has been asked, the coherent answer describing why sometimes two names (ie phrasal verb and prepositional verb) are given to the same ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

How is 'notwithstanding' governed by some preposition that is the 'subject of the verb'?

Source: p 993 of the book itself (but p 497 of the online viewer with the scroller at the bottom), An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English, volume 2 (1921), by Ernest Weekley: ...
0
votes
0answers
68 views

Is “Positions will be filled starting from August 1st, 2015.” unambiguous?

This is from a job listing for multiple positions, with a submission deadline of May 30th. Does this have an unambigious meaning? I can interpret it in two ways: They will decide upon the suitable ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

“Sales” ambiguity

I'm a software developer and for a store system I need to have two tabs in a menu. One tab for listing all the "sales" (a list of every time some items have been sold) and another tab for listing ...