An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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“hope…to win the approval” - help identify parts of speech

I'm confused by this sentence: "Lakesha hopes to win the approval of her mother by switching her major from fine arts to med." I think that in this case hope is intransitive, and I think the ...
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Definite article with the superlative degree of adverbs

Our rotary telephone is the least frequently used device in our house. Ben moved most quietly as the boys walked down the darkened ally. In the first sentence a superlative adverb is used ...
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Placing of adverb in a sentence

"This should perfectly be done". "This should be perfectly done". Of the two sentences, which one is correct? I am confused about placing of adverb "perfectly". Should the adverb be placed before ...
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228 views

Adverbs with prepositions

Much to my surprise, I've read recently that some adverbs do not inherit prepositional constructions from the adjectives they come from, for example: "The proof of Theorem 3 is similar to that of ...
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Collocation 'bolt upright'

What part of speech is the word 'bolt' in the adverb 'bolt upright'?
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60 views

Should I use “support of” or “support to” in this sentence?

"Heavy construction will furnish direct support [to/of] the company's real estate operations." Would "to" or "of" be proper?
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Inversion or no inversion after “only”?

Only now you can even get them on top of wrinkles. Only infrequently does it happen. As one of our members has said, inversion happens when a sentence starts with "only" and never ...
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550 views

'but' for contrast and 'but' for opposition

But does not mean the same thing in I like pop music but my parents like classical music. and in My parents have played a lot of classical music to me but I still don't like it. What is ...
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179 views

Placing “first” in a sentence; would it change the meaning?

How does the meaning of the following two sentences differ? I first wanted to tell you about it. I wanted to tell you about it first.
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63 views

Adverb to show both surprise and fear

I need an adverb to show both surprise and fear. Can we use shockingly or worriedly? For example, He asked shockingly.
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42 views

adverbial markers

1) "Even in those days he played golf every wednesday.".., in this sentence there are two adverbial markers(in those days and every wednesday) so which marker is considered as reference time and ...
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60 views

non-progressive, habitual actions

What is the difference between the following sentences? Even in those days he played golf on Wednesday. Even in those days he played golf on every Wednesday. Even in those days he played ...
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246 views

Is it ok to use “finally” at the end of the sentence like this?

Is it OK to use finally at the end of the sentence like this? I am a teacher finally. Or are the below ones only possible? I finally am a teacher. I am finally a teacher. Most people ...
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36 views

Use of preposition and prepositional adverb

I know that prepositions are not supposed to end a sentence; however, I have also read that some prepositions function as adverbs as seen in "come inside" and "run around". My question concerns an ...
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Starting a sentence with “and”-connected adverbs or adverbials

I want compare one thing with two other things, discussing their differences as follows. Balls are better than dice, since they provide better rollability. Moreover and in contrast to eggs, ...
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“Both win in this case, the students […] and science…” is the sentence incorrect?

I am unsure regarding this usage of 'both'. A friend of mine told me it is not correct. Both win in this case, the students who learned a new technique and science with more replications. Could ...
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59 views

Position of adverbs

It says that the position of adverbs should come before the verb and the example they give is: We will soon have a break. In this example, is it not acceptable to have the adverb after the verb: ...
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104 views

Adjectives used as adverbs/ verbs used as adjectives/ verbs used as adverbs

First question: I have been reading English: An Essential Grammar by Gerald Nelson and it gives an example of the words 'hard' and 'fast' being used as both adjectives and adverbs: Adverb: John ...
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Punctuation before and within an adverb clause

I have a sentence which includes two independent elements connected by 'and' within an adverb clause. Do I still place a comma before the and? Ex: Jett's dad died when he was seven and his little ...
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409 views

“based on” usage

I'm a little bit confused when I use a sentence like "It is divided based on glasses of milk". I'm not sure that it is used as an adverb or in the passive voice? Thanks.
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“They had already decided what to do” vs. “they had decided what to do already”

I was surprised that they had already decided what to do. I was surprised that they had decided what to do already. Which sentence is correct?
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Is “away” an adverb in “He ran away”. Also, is it an Object?

Is 'away' the object of the verb 'ran' in: I ran away ... or is it an adverb modifying the verb 'ran'? It seems to be obligatory, which may indicate that it's a phrasal verb as ODO has a ...
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What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?

If I had to guess I'd say it's an adverb, modifying the verb "bring," but it seems like it could also be interpreted as a preposition with "home" as the object. Both? Neither? Thanks for any help.
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Why is 'X notwithstanding' more correct than 'notwithstanding X'?

Source: p 575, Garner's Modern American Usage (3 ed; 2009), by Bryan Garner: notwithstanding is a FORMAL WORD, used in the sense "despite," "in spite of," or "although." E.g., "Notwithstanding an ...
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31 views

Nowhere near and nowhere close to

I am so confused about which is modifying which. In the sentence below: It was nowhere close to being done. Nowhere: An adverb modifying close It's the farthest I could get. I don't know if ...
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32 views

When to use “-ly” (scientific language)

I'm wondering about what is the correct wording and in particular, which grammar rules are underlying your decision. Some loci are expressed independent of the environment. Some loci are expressed ...
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56 views

Adverb for a third of a year

Similar to Is there a proper term to describe 1/3 of a year (4 months) Are there any words to describe a trimester as an adverb? The only one I've seen is triannually (in the link above) which is a ...
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use of “due to” or “becasue of” with modal verbs

I understand the simple distinction between "due to" ("adjectival") and "because of" (adverbial), but I get a little confused when the sentence includes modal or complex verbs. For example, could one ...
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Subordinating Conjunctions and Conjunctive adverbs

Is there way to identify which words are Subordinating Conjunctions and which are Conjunctive adverbs, or do we need to memorize it? Both seems similar to me Subordinating Conjunctions: Although, ...
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Adverb of manner and participle in subjective participle construction

Why is an adverb of manner placed before participle in the sentence "We watched the temperature gradually rising"? I know that if the verb is transitive, then the adverb of manner can be placed ...
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89 views

How can nouns be used to modify adjectives?

I know you can "as a " after an adjective. Is there a way to use the noun like an adverb? My logic tells me that I'd need to add a suffix to make it an adjective ("-like", "-ish"). Then, I'd need ...
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113 views

Punctuating sentences with multiple adverb forms

What is generally considered the correct way to punctuate multiple adverb forms in a sentence? E.g., She stood discreetly, close to a bus stop, across the street from the entrance of a modern office ...
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37 views

“Come home.” — other adverbs which refer to the noun versions of themselves?

In the phrase Come home. the word 'home' is playing the role of adverb, and essentially means 'to or towards home'. It is interesting to me that it has a rather recursive definition; are there ...
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175 views

How refer to the god and devil using pronouns and adverbs?

I'm trying to phrase a sentence where I want to refer to the god and the devil/satan by using a combination of pronouns and adverbs rather than their names or nouns such as "good/evil", "divine power" ...
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334 views

Is “per se” used more in formal or informal situations?

What is the formality level of "per se"?
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Where to put the adverb in passive sentences?

While writing another question on this site, I was uncertain about placement of adverbs in passive sentences. It shouldn't frequently be used in the context of immaterial things. It shouldn't ...