An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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A Question on Parallelism

Sample sentence: "With three days remaining in the term, Mitzy started doing research, creating an outline, and wrote a rough draft." In this case, is "doing" a verb in parallel with "creating" but ...
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Use and position of the adverb “instead” when introducing the second of two items

Is the use of the adverb instead appropriate, and correct, in the last of the following three sentences? The top half of the figure shows the service provided by the system in a first, generic ...
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1answer
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Do proper adverbs fall out of usage in current spoken American English?

While watching American movies and TV series, I notice that in dialogue very often the usage of a proper adverb is replaced by the corresponding adjective (in the case where the adverb is formed by ...
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62 views

How do you know if a derivative word is actually an English word?

For example, "recidivistic" can be found in Merriam-Webster as an adjective derivative of recidivist. How do I know if "recidivistically" is adverb form of "recidivistic"? It is not listed in ...
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42 views

What “degrees” of consideration are there?

I am seriously considering taking English lessons Are there other degrees of consideration that are a little less serious?
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20 views

Very much? What?

In this sentence: The air force and navy were modernized but the army, very much the poor relation, was not. The "very much" used here seems to be different from the "very much" of "thank you ...
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512 views

'such as something' vs. 'such something as'

The original one: 1. From the view point of outstanding teachers such as John... From the view point of such outstanding teachers as John ... From the view point of outstanding teachers such John ...
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199 views

Adverbs with prepositions

Much to my surprise, I've read recently that some adverbs do not inherit prepositional constructions from the adjectives they come from, for example: "The proof of Theorem 3 is similar to that of ...
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“Deliberately” vs. “intentionally” vs. “on purpose”

I wonder if there is any difference between usage of these three: deliberately intentionally on purpose Are they completely interchangeable? Are they at the same level of formality? I found some ...
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Adverbial form of “pixel”?

I know that the verbal and verbal-noun forms of pixel are pixelate and pixelation, respectively, but what is/are the adverbial form(s) of the term? I looked on the OED, ODO, Merriam-Webster Online, ...
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340 views

What should I use between “triple” vs. “all”?

If I have 2 pens and I want to say all of them are green, I can say "Both of them are green" but if I have 3 pens should I use "Triple of them are green" or "All of them are green"?
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42 views

How can you use Fuzzily in a sentence? [closed]

I typed fuzzily in a spell-checked field on a website and was surprised to see it said it was correct. I looked it up on Merriam-Webster, and sure enough they list it as a word: fuzz·i·ly ...
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“Above”/“below” before/after a noun

I have seen sentences similar to the following: (1) See the reference above. (2) See the reference below. And, (3) See the above reference. But not, (4) See the below reference. ...
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52 views

Modern words for “contrariwise”

Does contrariwise sound old-fashioned? As in Alice in Wonderland: ‘Contrariwise,’ continued Tweedledee, ‘if it was so, it might be.’ What are the modern words for contrariwise?
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32 views

Adjective or adverb? [closed]

Which is correct? I want her to grow up confident. I want her to grow up confidently.
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88 views

“It was a truly amazing experience” vs “It was truly an amazing experience”

Is there much of a difference between these two sentences? It was a truly amazing experience. It was truly an amazing experience.
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1answer
45 views

the order of several adverbs of time

When I'm given several adverbs of time how do I arrange them? For example, I need to insert these adverbs: in the morning / that Thursday / March 22, 2013 into this sentence: A tornado had ...
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82k views

Get hold of, get ahold of, get a hold of

Under what circumstances would you prefer one of the following over the other two? Get hold of Get ahold of Get a hold of
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1answer
165 views

“based on” usage

I'm a little bit confused when I use a sentence like "It is divided based on glasses of milk". I'm not sure that it is used as an adverb or in the passive voice? Thanks.
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1answer
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Is it appropriate to say “I've never been” when referring to a place, omitting the adverb “there” from the phrase?

I have been hearing the phrase "I've never been" with increasing frequency lately when referring to places (i.e., "I'd like to go to the Apollo. I've never been" as opposed to "I've never been ...
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136k views

Which is correct: “drive safe” or “drive safely”?

When someone is going to drive their car somewhere, I always used to say "drive safely" to them. Recently I was told I should say "drive safe." (From: Would you ask someone to drive safe or to ...
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3answers
12k views

How to use 'even so'?

We were staying at the most expensive hotel in town. But, even so, there were no toilet rolls in the washroom. I was struck by the use of 'even so' in the above sentence. Is it correct? Shouldn't it ...
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5answers
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Part of speech of “very,” “extremely,” “really,” and “quite”

While working on developing the lexicon in one of my constructed languages, I encountered a slight difficulty in using standard classifications for words like very, extremely, really, and quite. To ...
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What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?

If I had to guess I'd say it's an adverb, modifying the verb "bring," but it seems like it could also be interpreted as a preposition with "home" as the object. Both? Neither? Thanks for any help.
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715 views

“I wish for a rest now”: what does “now” modify?

Consider this sentence: I am truly amazed by my success at this diagramming business, but I wish for a rest now. I think that the adverb "now" modifies "rest". But according to the answer page, ...
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Is “caught you unawares” correct?

I read a book and came across "caught you unawares". I kept thinking it's supposed to be "caught you unaware". Is this an acceptable form or was that a typo or something?
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60 views

Is “when” an adverb in this usage?

'When did you last see him?' In the above sentence, is "when" an adverb? If so, what word is it modifying?
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1answer
44 views

The correct syntactic usage of “Only”

Question #1: Which of the following sentences has the correct syntactic usage of the word "only"? Question #2: What do the remaining sentences mean? Examples: Only I gave him $1. I only ...
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Redundancy in “becoming increasingly”

Isn't it redundant to say "becoming increasingly (adjective)"? I know this is a common construction, but it seems to me that increasingly already includes the idea that it is already (adjective) but ...
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1answer
79 views

Adverb or adjective when used to describe an infinitive?

"To play basketball" is an infinitive phrase. An infinitive phrase is generally used as a noun. Is the word "professionally" as in "To play basketball professionally..." an adjective or an adverb? Is ...
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171 views

Posititon of an adverb of manner with participles

I have seen many rules about position of an adverbs with finite forms of verbs but I can't find the rule about where to place an adverb with nonfinitive verbs. For example which of the sentence sounds ...
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5answers
173 views

Adverb equivalent of Wirelessly for wired

It does not matter whether you connect wirelessly or by wires. While this seems to sufficiently convey my intent, I find myself personally hesitating anytime I speak or type it, as it feels ...
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2k views

Is “in about” grammatical in “I'll reach there in about 5 minutes”?

Is it correct to say "I'll reach there in about 5 minutes?" Is "in about" correct in this sentence?
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In “Bugger Indian passport”, is bugger an adjective of “passport” or of “India”?

One of my friends said this. I have been pretty sure bugger is an adjective of the "passport". But, I was surprised that some of my friends interpreted as an adjective of "India". And some ...
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58 views

How can nouns be used to modify adjectives?

I know you can "as a " after an adjective. Is there a way to use the noun like an adverb? My logic tells me that I'd need to add a suffix to make it an adjective ("-like", "-ish"). Then, I'd need ...
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“Maybe” versus “perhaps”

Was there ever a real distinction between the two? I always have the urge to use maybe for discussing state and perhaps for actions. I know this is only because perhaps (by hap) and happen (befall by ...
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Where is the right place to put “only” [duplicate]

I'm unsure where to put the word "only" in the following sentence: The machine must be operated by the authorized personnel from [company X] only. The machine must only be operated by the ...
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Verb + '-ly' = adjectvie?

I am learning in Korea. So I rarely have an opportunity of real English. Anyway, My Teacher said that 'noun + -ly = adjective' and 'adjective + -ly = adverbs' Then, what about 'verb + -ly'? Is it ...
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Use “underway” or “under way” as an adverb?

Is it proper to use underway as an adverb? Or should under way be used? Merriam-Webster defines underway as an adjective and under way as an adverb. The Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & ...
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2answers
212 views

When to use “most” or “the most”

I came across with this sentence and it cast me doubt the usage of "most" and "the most" The sentence states: "But what I remembered most is moving a lot" Would it change the meaning of the ...
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4answers
17k views

“Nowadays” vs “today”

I'm taking an English academic writing course. My teacher recommended using today as it is more accepted compared to nowadays. I asked her if this is accepted in American English (she's from US) or in ...
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55 views

What does “over” mean in this question? [closed]

I'd like to know whether "over" is necessary or not in the following question: Do you want to come over for dinner tonight?
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5answers
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Is “alone” an adverb in “I was sitting alone”?

Is the sentence "I was sitting alone." correct? And if so, is "alone" an adverb? Are there other examples of adjectives being used as adverbs without modification?
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1answer
36 views

Is “'as' + article + adjective + noun + 'as'” grammatically correct?

The sentiments expressed in the tweets can be as accurate a measure as is found with traditional telephone surveys. The sentence above is grammatically correct. I wonder if it is still ok ...
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Relative adverbs

I am having some trouble understanding why relative adverbs function as adverbs in a relative clause. My family worships in a church, where my parents married. In the above example, I understand ...
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1answer
75 views

What's the correct adverb to go with “renovated”? [closed]

I've come across the following on billboards: "Newly renovated suites..." It's apparent that the intended meaning here is "recently" and so I believe that "newly" may not be appropriate to go with ...
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4answers
12k views

Correct position of “only”

Which is grammatically correct? I can only do so much in this time. or I can do only so much in this time.
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2answers
120 views

Past Participle as Adverb

I just read the following sentence from a German native speaker: We have to do this coordinated. I am also German native speaker, so this sentence sounds like a straight translation of Wir ...
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35 views

Using ‘later’ when the amount of time is a complex phrase

In sentences like ‘The speed 10 seconds later is 3 m/s’ the amount of time is easy to specify. But what can I do if it is a complex phrase? In particular, I should like to express v(t + dt) in words, ...
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492 views

Grammaticality of “What is there there?”

If someone says I am going to the market I may ask What is there at the market? If someone says I am going to the bookstore I may ask What is there at the bookstore? If someone ...