An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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what is the word decribes maintaing your body on the water surface

what is the verb or the word indicates the following action: when you are in the water and you cant swim but you just move you extremities so hard and quickly to remain on the water surface and to not ...
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57 views

Can I use 'a little' at the end of this sentence?

I know 'a little' can be used as an adverb to modify an adjective as in the sentence: I am a little hungry. However, can I also use 'a little' just like this in this sentence as well? I am ...
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2answers
48 views

how to correctly rephrase the sentence [on hold]

in the following sentence: ..such poor educational system produces scientifically sterile generations able just to regurgitate what i ment be "scientifically sterile generations" is, a ...
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24 views

Should I say “education resources” or “educational resources”?

In the following sentence: The stagnation in the educational process in middle east is quasi attributed to the deficit in the budget allotted to the education resources. Should it have been "......
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13k views

“currently not” or “not currently”

What's the correct order: Lessons are not currently being offered. or Lessons are currently not being offered.
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2answers
97 views

What might be the name of the educational stages prior to the university?

What could one call the educational stages prior to university? I know that there are the primary, elementary and secondary levels of education. But is there a hypernym for just the aforementioned ...
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1answer
59 views

adverbial markers

1) "Even in those days he played golf every wednesday.".., in this sentence there are two adverbial markers(in those days and every wednesday) so which marker is considered as reference time and ...
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1answer
87 views

non-progressive, habitual actions

What is the difference between the following sentences? Even in those days he played golf on Wednesday. Even in those days he played golf on every Wednesday. Even in those days he played ...
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40 views

word descibes teaching by order

What is the proper word for describing the kind of teaching which based on executing/applying what you heard from your teacher without thinking of it or even applying reason. To just to do what you ...
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2answers
113 views

how to describe a person capable of reading and writing in more than one language [duplicate]

what would describe the person who able to read and write in more than one language. Is there any other descriptive word than "Bilingual"?
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2answers
68 views

What is the proper adjective for keep looking for long time?

What is the proper adjective that best describe the way a person keeps looking at any other person or object so that as if his eye is about to get out. As an example, when a man keeps looking at a ...
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1answer
29 views

Adjectives used as adverbs

In the following sentences, adjectives are used as if they are adverbs. The child listened to the story spellbound. They left the party happy. We wanted to choose some shoes but we left the shop ...
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Mid position adverb

I am confused with the use of mid position adverbs in passive sentences, you can check in Google Scholar that these two structure is used more often than their counterparts. "can also be seen" and "...
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“Hence” and “hence why”

My question is, is the use of the word "hence", used in it's most common sense as an alternative to "therefore", strictly acceptable in English usage in the following example: I like bananas, ...
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1answer
3k views

Is this Adverbial a complement or an adjunct?

According to Wiki, Adverbials are typically divided into four classes: adverbial complements (i.e. obligatory adverbial) are adverbials that render a sentence ungrammatical and meaningless if removed....
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2answers
53 views

What is the word for a Road Sign that shows direction

What is the right word for the signs in the highways that indicates the correct direction to another city or province for an example? I thought about the word "road signs", but it is not what I am ...
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1answer
46 views

Which clause does the adverb modify in this sentence? [on hold]

I have the following sentence: "The KKK was a secret organization; apart from a few top leaders the members never revealed their membership and wore masks in public." Does the adverb "never" ...
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1answer
29 views

Why does “this car is riding fastly” sound terribly awkward?

I checked this and this answer, but it still unclear to me. Let's say This car is fast (slow, careful, lazy) Here fast/slow definitely is adjective, it describes the car. But if we modify ...
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Doubtless or doubtlessly?

To my surprise I found that doubtless is used as an adverb without appending the "-ly". Doubtless, some of you will know more examples. It feels wrong, but then again, I am not a native speaker....
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44 views

What types of words can be appended to a keyword to produce a legible phrase? [closed]

I'm creating a random business name generator. For example if I provide the word: cars, the generator will create a handful of random words such as: robot cars cars united penny cars cars delight ...
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4answers
108 views

“hope…to win the approval” - help identify parts of speech

I'm confused by this sentence: "Lakesha hopes to win the approval of her mother by switching her major from fine arts to med." I think that in this case hope is intransitive, and I think the ...
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38 views

Can an adverb modify two actions?

The following sentences describe a conversation between two people. The first person looks around, and the second person does the same thing but another action in addition. "There's a lot of ...
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1answer
26 views

In what circumstances can we omit commas when using adverbs at the beginning of a sentence? [closed]

it is a common practice to separate an adverb at the beginning of a sentence from the rest with a comma. However, I have read somewhere that we can omit the comma when no pause is needed. Is this ...
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5answers
14k views

Which is correct, “on-line” or “online”?

I am still seeing uses of on-line, though I think it is incorrect. For example: A web browser enables a user to go on-line/online. Can you tell me which is the more appropriate to use, on-line ...
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628 views

Always vs Every day

I have lunch at school every day vs I always have lunch at school. Why does the frequency adverb, always, go before the verb, have, whereas the expression, "every day" is placed at the end of ...
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2answers
67 views

“This is an interesting-looking book.”

"This is an interesting-looking book." The point of the hyphen is to make 'looking' relate to 'interesting' and not directly to 'book'. 'Looking' modifies 'interesting'…or is it the other way around? ...
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A question about preposition [migrated]

In the following sentence " I meet him on friday" , we use preposition 'on' before 'friday' , but in the following sentence "I met him last friday" we dont use preposition before 'last friday' . the ...
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…is/was a posthumously recognised writer

A colleague of mine wrote this sentence- Anne Frank is a posthumously recognised young writer. I say 'is' should be replaced with 'was'. My reason- the meaning of the sentence should not change ...
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Can the word USUAL become an adverb?

Looking at this sentence - 'The children seem their usual amount of tired.' I'm trying to figure out whether the word USUAL is an adverb in this sentence or not? To me it gives further information ...
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1answer
58 views

Adverb position <hardly> [closed]

I’m asking about the position of the adverb “hardly” in sentences. If the second sentence doesn’t have the same meaning as the first, what’s the difference? I had hardly any money coming into ...
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87 views

Can one form an adverb from any adjective?

I'm trying to form the following sentence: ...we can talk more substantiatively in the event that X occurs. The term "substantiatively" isn't in either the computer dictionary or online at m-w....
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Use of preposition and prepositional adverb

I know that prepositions are not supposed to end a sentence; however, I have also read that some prepositions function as adverbs, as seen in "come inside" and "run around." My question concerns an ...
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1answer
132 views

Punctuation before and within an adverb clause

I have a sentence which includes two independent elements connected by 'and' within an adverb clause. Do I still place a comma before the and? Ex: Jett's dad died when he was seven and his little ...
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“Not enough memory” vs. “no enough memory” [migrated]

Which is correct? Why? Not enough memory No enough memory The first variant seems to be significantly more popular on the Internet than the second one.
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Starting a sentence with “and”-connected adverbs or adverbials

I want compare one thing with two other things, discussing their differences as follows. Balls are better than dice, since they provide better rollability. Moreover and in contrast to eggs, ...
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58 views

Is 'more later' grammatically incorrect?

I've just stumbled into "We’ll cover this idea more later" in a book. Is it a widely used form? and if so, what's the difference from plain 'later'? To me it sounds weird, even ungrammatical, but I'm ...
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40 views

How do question words work as adverbs?

"I know how they work." 'How' seems like an adverb to 'work'. I know adverbs are supposed to answer, for instance, how a verb is done. But 'how' doesn't answer how…regardless of whether it is an ...
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48 views

“Trivially translate” vs. “translate trivally” — which is corrent?

Which one is correct? Do both sentences have the same meaning? The table definition does not trivially translate to the underlying data structures. The table definition does not translate ...
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'Dark' and 'light' functioning as adverbs or adjectives in the sentence “The dark brown coat will match the light brown pants perfectly”

"The dark brown coat will match the light brown pants perfectly" Do 'dark' and 'light' function here as adjectives modifying 'brown' or are they adverbs informing us to the manner of degree? I've ...
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3answers
20k views

Adverbs position in English: “place–manner–time” or “manner–place–time”?

Wikipedia tells us that the order should be place–manner–time. However, this webpage tells that it should be manner–Place–Time. Which one is correct? I have one sentence in two different orders: ...
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891 views

Is “now” a “preposition”?

My question starts from this question which asks about difference between currently and right now, which is not that complicated. However, in the middle of exchanging comments, I found a few points ...
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4answers
203 views

“defeat Trump badly”

In a live-streamed speech, the Vermont senator made it clear he is no longer actively challenging Clinton and that the goal is to ‘defeat Trump badly’ … “The major political task that we face in ...
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477 views

Is it ok to use “finally” at the end of the sentence like this?

Is it OK to use finally at the end of the sentence like this? I am a teacher finally. Or are the below ones only possible? I finally am a teacher. I am finally a teacher. Most people ...
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3answers
102 views

“Cowardly” as an adverb [closed]

Is "cowardly" both an adjective and an adverb? Question inspired by this awkward error message from Homebrew. Error: Cowardly refusing to 'sudo brew install' Surely there is another way to ...
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60 views

Difference between 'through' and 'throughout'

I'm not sure which is correct: The bride's mother sniffed all the way through/throughout the wedding service. According to the Cambridge dictionary, 'through' means 'from the beginning to the ...
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1answer
61 views

Why is “and” not used before “, etc.”? [closed]

When you use , etc. to indicate that further, similar items are included, for example: We’re trying to resolve problems of withdrawal, peer pressure, etc. Is it incorrect to use , and etc.?
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21 views

“how” vs. “just how”

How does the nuance of the following sentence change with and without the word “just”? That accident is a reminder of just how quickly life can change. Somehow I would automatically put in “just,...
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1answer
33 views

Is the phrase, bacterially sealed, correct usage [closed]

If one is referring to a connection between two metallic elements as being so tight that it excludes bacteria, would it be correct usage to say that the connection is bacterially sealed? It sounds ...
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“What” as an adverb

In "What does it matter?", the "what" is considered as not a pronoun but an adverb in most dictionaries. I'd like to see more example sentences where "what" is used as an adverb like this. But the ...
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Is it proper to combine prepositions using conjunctions?

I have come across the issue of wanting to use both two prepositions to describe a subject. This is not a common issue, judging by the lack of information regarding it. This is an example of the type ...