An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Instead of grammar using senteces

I want to know how use instead of in simple sentences. is this Example correct? For me, Computer uses instead of the mobile phone
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109 views

Use and position of the adverb “instead” when introducing the second of two items

Is the use of the adverb instead appropriate, and correct, in the last of the following three sentences? The top half of the figure shows the service provided by the system in a first, generic ...
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To explain! there [closed]

The medico went to the nearest village and (there) in the bazaar he found various kinds of meat and fish. What does "there" refer to?
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2answers
190 views

Adverbs with prepositions

Much to my surprise, I've read recently that some adverbs do not inherit prepositional constructions from the adjectives they come from, for example: "The proof of Theorem 3 is similar to that of ...
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4answers
17k views

“Nowadays” vs “today”

I'm taking an English academic writing course. My teacher recommended using today as it is more accepted compared to nowadays. I asked her if this is accepted in American English (she's from US) or in ...
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2answers
50 views

What does “over” mean in this question? [closed]

I'd like to know whether "over" is necessary or not in the following question: Do you want to come over for dinner tonight?
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5answers
864 views

Is “alone” an adverb in “I was sitting alone”?

Is the sentence "I was sitting alone." correct? And if so, is "alone" an adverb? Are there other examples of adjectives being used as adverbs without modification?
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1answer
34 views

Is “'as' + article + adjective + noun + 'as'” grammatically correct?

The sentiments expressed in the tweets can be as accurate a measure as is found with traditional telephone surveys. The sentence above is grammatically correct. I wonder if it is still ok ...
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3answers
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Relative adverbs

I am having some trouble understanding why relative adverbs function as adverbs in a relative clause. My family worships in a church, where my parents married. In the above example, I understand ...
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37 views

Adverb or adjective when used to describe an infinitive?

"To play basketball" is an infinitive phrase. An infinitive phrase is generally used as a noun. Is the word "professionally" as in "To play basketball professionally..." an adjective or an adverb? Is ...
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1answer
58 views

What's the correct adverb to go with “renovated”? [closed]

I've come across the following on billboards: "Newly renovated suites..." It's apparent that the intended meaning here is "recently" and so I believe that "newly" may not be appropriate to go with ...
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4answers
11k views

Correct position of “only”

Which is grammatically correct? I can only do so much in this time. or I can do only so much in this time.
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2answers
64 views

Past Participle as Adverb

I just read the following sentence from a German native speaker: We have to do this coordinated. I am also German native speaker, so this sentence sounds like a straight translation of Wir ...
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1answer
29 views

Using ‘later’ when the amount of time is a complex phrase

In sentences like ‘The speed 10 seconds later is 3 m/s’ the amount of time is easy to specify. But what can I do if it is a complex phrase? In particular, I should like to express v(t + dt) in words, ...
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406 views

Grammaticality of “What is there there?”

If someone says I am going to the market I may ask What is there at the market? If someone says I am going to the bookstore I may ask What is there at the bookstore? If someone ...
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1answer
2k views

Comparative and superlative adverbs?

I'm a native speaker of English, and I don't know how many times I've wanted to say "happilier" instead of "more happily", or "happiliest" instead of "most happily". Is there any record of such ...
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2answers
24 views

Where is the right place for the adverb 'well' in a sentence?

I want to write: "I understand something." But I want add emphasis by including the adverb "well". Which is the right place for it? I well understand something. I understand well something. I ...
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6answers
7k views

Can an adverb be a noun at the same time?

In this sentence: Ben and Jen went home. Is home both an adverb and a noun?
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3answers
579 views

However vs. how ever: one word or two?

I am writing a paper and stumbled upon this sentence of mine. "The output remained consistently poor however the data was/were analysed". "The output remained consistently poor how ever the ...
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3answers
9k views

Which is correct, “on-line” or “online”?

I am still seeing uses of on-line, though I think it is incorrect. For example: A web browser enables a user to go on-line/online. Can you tell me which is the more appropriate to use, on-line ...
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2answers
53 views

Posititon of an adverb of manner with participles

I have seen many rules about position of an adverbs with finite forms of verbs but I can't find the rule about where to place an adverb with nonfinitive verbs. For example which of the sentence sounds ...
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40 views

Order of multiple adverbs

1) Нe went upstairs quietly last night. 2) Нe quietly went upstairs last night. What version is right? I can't find information about this issue.
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1answer
102 views

“based on” usage

I'm a little bit confused when I use a sentence like "It is divided based on glasses of milk". I'm not sure that it is used as an adverb or in the passive voice? Thanks.
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1answer
38 views

Conjunctive adverbs preceded by conjunctions

I've been under the impression that conjunctive adverbs needn't be preceded by a full-ish stop (e.g., a period or semicolon). I don't know where I got that idea, and consequently, as a lover of ...
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9answers
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Is “rather” shifting to become a verb?

In colloquial English, I constantly run across sentences of the form: I rather my [noun] [verb] A quick Google search returns tons of examples: I rather my opponents don't find out. I ...
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2answers
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Can adverbs be qualified as transitive/intransitive?

In my english lesson today i was told that "afterwards" is an intransitive adverb (I cannot write "afterwards this") while "after" is a transitive adverb. Is this distinction transitive/intransitive ...
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94 views

How does 'X notwithstanding' = 'notwithstanding X'?

I wish to understand 'notwithstanding', only in terms of the adverb 'not' and the (root) verb withstand. So please base on your feedback on these two words, instead of other words. Hereafter, suppose ...
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Why is 'X notwithstanding' more correct than 'notwithstanding X'?

Source: p 575, Garner's Modern American Usage (3 ed; 2009), by Bryan Garner: notwithstanding is a FORMAL WORD, used in the sense "despite," "in spite of," or "although." E.g., "Notwithstanding an ...
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37 views

Order of adverbs

Is there any specific rationale behind ordering similar adverbs? Clearly, I point out time adverbs, never and ever. I've found examples in which these two used in different orders. My mom will ...
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2answers
129 views

Adverb position in “Listen carefully to what I say” [closed]

I've come across the phrase "Listen carefully to what I say" and I'm really not sure why carefully has gone in between listen and to. It doesn't happen with other verbs; you don't "switch carefully on ...
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2answers
5k views

“Would rather [infinitive1] than [infinitive2]” vs. “would rather that [subjunctive]”"

I am aware of sentences like Beth would rather study at the library than go to parties. There is another type of using rather that: She would rather that the plane leave early in the ...
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1answer
26 views

What should I say? Across or between camera views?

My question is regarding the usage of "across" and "between". I want to say that a person is viewed by one camera, then disappears and, after a while is sensed by a different cameras. I wrote ...
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2answers
66 views

Does “unexpectedly” apply to one or both following verb phrases?

We're having a discussion in a forum on rulings in duplicate bridge. In duplicate bridge, each partnership has their own set of bidding system agreements, and there are regulations that specify that ...
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1answer
53 views

Should I say “rules of here” or “rules here”?

For example, should I ask "Do you know the rules of here?" or "... the rules here?" I believe the latter is correct but I did see some people use the former, got confused :-(
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1answer
85 views

Can you start a sentence with “Hopefully,…”? [duplicate]

I am studying for the SAT, and I learned just now that the following sentence is grammatically incorrect: Hopefully, we will be able to complete the building before the rainy season sets in. ...
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280 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
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1answer
160 views

Why not 'somewhy'?

When I originally wrote this ELL question, I used 'somewhy' instead of 'for some reason' for want of concision. Only afterwards, a user kindly advised that 'somewhy' obsolesced. But why? Google led ...
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155 views

“I weigh about 5 lbs.”

This stems from a discussion over on ELL which has moved beyond being useful to second-language learners. In short, consider the sentence: I weigh about 5 pounds. What part of speech is ...
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3answers
115 views

“more than usual” vs. “more than usually”

Which sentence is correct? "I had more customers than usual." "I had more customers than usually." "More than usual" sounds pretty common, but "more than usually" seems more correct when I think ...
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6answers
18k views

“Maybe” versus “perhaps”

Was there ever a real distinction between the two? I always have the urge to use maybe for discussing state and perhaps for actions. I know this is only because perhaps (by hap) and happen (befall by ...
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2answers
99 views

What part of speech is 'closer' functioning as in 'I moved closer'?

'I moved closer.' At face value, 'closer' seems to be acting like an adjective; however, I don't see anything in the sentence to which it can refer. A friend suggested that 'to move closer', 'to ...
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2answers
43 views

Difference between “be promoted soon” and “soon be promoted”?

You have done well and you will be promoted soon. You have done well and you will soon be promoted. What's the difference? Is one of them grammatically wrong? EDIT: I asked one of my ...
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1answer
102 views

“There is the man.” Is *there* an adverb or pronoun?

According to Dictionary.com there adverb in or at that place (opposed to here ): She is there now. pronoun (used to introduce a sentence or clause in which ...
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1answer
42 views

'Immediately' used not as an adverb, but as a conjunction

I'm sure that I've heard (not read) someone use the word immediately in a sentence in the same way that we would use "when" or "as soon as", and I would like to know if this is correct? Here's an ...
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“Here he comes”, “Here comes he” : The order of pronoun and verb in inversion

It's very common to say: "Here he comes." "Here comes the man." But what about: "Here comes he." "Here the man comes." Is there a rule about the order of noun and verb in ...
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13k views

Adverbs position in English: “place–manner–time” or “manner–place–time”?

Wikipedia tells us that the order should be place–manner–time. However, this webpage tells that it should be manner–Place–Time. Which one is correct? I have one sentence in two different orders: ...
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0answers
26 views

Is the clause “where are you from” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

One of the most fundamental sentence from the English “phrasebook” that almost every beginner will learn is this sentence, using which one can ask another one’s nationality or country/region of ...
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7answers
304 views

No adverb of controlled?

Can anyone confirm that there is indeed no adverbial form of "controlled" that could be used with verbs that describe actions done in a controlled way. For example, it seems to be wrong to write ...
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-ly adverb at the beginning of the sentence

I once took a multiple choice exam where there was a section with all possible answers being made up of a single word, an -ly suffix adverb followed by a comma at the beginning of the sentence. ...
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Would “objectively necessary” convey that something is necessary as a matter of fact, regardless of opinions?

In Russian "objectively necessary" (literal translation) means necessary as a matter of fact, not as a matter of judgement. Like, e.g., the water is objectively necessary for plants to grow. Does ...