An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Is there any difference between “[Only/All/All] that I need is”?

Is there any difference between: Only I need is All I need is All That I need is I noticed that this phrase is used with nouns after "is", can I use this phrase with verbs? for example: Only ...
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54 views

Which position does “really” and “quite” go?

I know really is an adverb, and one that intensifies the verb. I also know that some adverbs go only in the beginning; in the middle or at the end of a sentence, and some can be placed in all three ...
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62 views

Is there an adverb for “quickly at first, slowly later”?

When water comes out of a faucet at the bottom of a tank, it comes out quickly first and then it tapers off. Is there an adverb for such a case?
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30 views

Where to position adverbs

They may sound both correct but which one is more acceptable in standard written English? She is writing a letter now. or She is now writing a letter. Thanks
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129 views

“It is time now” or “It is now time”? [closed]

It is time now or It is now time Which of these expressions is grammatically correct?
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1k views

“How best to handle” vs. “how to best handle”

Are there rules on the placement of 'best'? They are deciding how to best handle the matter. They are deciding how best to handle the matter. Is one of them wrong?
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1answer
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Adverb position in perfect tenses [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence? My question concerns the adverb position in perfect tenses. For example look at these ...
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2answers
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Adverbs position in English: “place–manner–time” or “manner–place–time”?

Wikipedia tells us that the order should be place–manner–time. However, this webpage tells that it should be manner–Place–Time. Which one is correct? I have one sentence in two different orders: ...
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711 views

Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence?

For example: Ever wish you could share information broadly Could it be rewritten to: Ever wish you could broadly share information Are there any rules for the position of the adverbs.
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831 views

Adverb word order: “nicely shows” vs “shows nicely”

I have the following sentence in my dissertation: The even-tempered STO basis for Mg shows nicely why the virial theorem cannot be trusted as an error indicator. However, previously I had there: ...
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580 views

Where should I place the adverb?

Where should I place the adverb? Potentially, it could be moved back to where it was. It could be potentially moved back to where it was. It could potentially be moved back to where it was. ...
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5k views

Where should adverbs be placed?

There are two sentences: I completely understand. I understand completely. Which one is correct and why? Another example: I slowly opened the door. I opened the door slowly.
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432 views

Adverb placement in “Let's simply share”

To me the expression Let's simply share seems wrong. I've always thought the adverb should come after the verb. Is that correct?
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“He acted strange(ly?)”

It would make sense if both of these sentences were grammatically correct; but is anything different between them meaning-wise? He acted very strange when I told him about the missing amulet. ...
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3k views

Is “very less” correct English?

Is using very less correct English? My friend suggests it should be very little. Are they both correct, or is there a difference?
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1answer
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Meaning of “sensorily”

As a non-native English speaker, I am having a hard time understanding what the author means by sensorily austere here. The quote is taken from Man in the landscape, by Paul Shepard. The desert is ...
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6answers
3k views

“Hardly” vs. “barely”

I'm from Germany and in German both translate to the same word (kaum). I'd like to know the difference between these two words, hardly and barely.
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2answers
34 views

A relative adverb or a conjunction or both?

I am not familiar with the idea that an adverb can function as a conjunction at the same time. Here are a couple of sentences that are confusing me. This is the reason why she left him. ...and ...
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3k views

“Appointed as” or just “appointed”?

Is it more correct to say a) John was appointed as manager of ACME. or b) John was appointed manager of ACME. Or are they interchangeable?
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Adjective request for fast, lightweightness and multitasking [closed]

I am deciding some product name which has characteristics like Fast and lightweight and multitasking. Please suggest some name which includes these meaning or bird or animal which has such qualities. ...
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2answers
33 views

Offers home delivery vs home delivers

In which of these 2 sentences is the verb "Home deliver" used correctly, in compliance with the rest of the sentence? ABC offers home delivery of pharmaceuticals, compounded medications, and wellness ...
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4answers
90 views

Quantification of Frequency Adverbs

This is a list of common frequency adverbs in English with rough estimates of their absolute frequency someone has posted on an ESL study site: Always (100% of the time) Frequently (about 90% of ...
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4answers
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Is it right to say “before since”?

I wonder if "before since" is right in my sentence. If not, could you please help me improve it? This company provides products since 2010. Consequently, there is no record of this product before ...
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4answers
74 views

What word (e.g. eventually vs potentially) does express better the following scenario? [closed]

The scenario: a) John believes that Peter Parker has a PhD degree. b) Peter Parker is the spider man, but John does not know about this. Which sentence does express the scenario in the best ...
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Using “seldomly”

I'm not a native English speaker. If at all possible I try to use spell checkers while writing anything on the web hence using one in Firefox as well. Whenever I try to write "seldomly" it highlights ...
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19answers
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What is the “thirsty” equivalent of “ravenously”?

When you eat something very hungrily, you can use the adverb "ravenously" to describe it. But when you drink something very fast in a similar way to quench your thirst, what adverb can you use to ...
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1answer
58 views

Adverb position problems

I am confused about adverbs that can be placed in front of the verb as in: He quickly reads a book. And can be used at the end of the sentence as in: He works hardly Can I mix them as: ...
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1answer
96 views

'the cleanest' vs 'cleanest': article-containing adverb phrases?

We have two phrases structures: 'the nicest in my school' 'the cleanest in my house' These phrases can act as nouns or adverbs: 'He is the nicest in my school.' - noun phrase. 'She cleaned the ...
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296 views

“Love me tender”: adverb or adjective?

Is the last word in each of these phrases an adverb or an adjective? How can we know? love me tender treat me nice hold me tight
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Difference between “supposedly” and “supposably”

What is the difference between supposedly and supposably? Both are real words but seem to have confusingly similar definitions. Supposably: Capable of being supposed : conceivable ...
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Where to place “to” in sentence: What we do, where it starts, and to where it often leads

My former grammar professors would say: "Use 'where' to mean a 'place' only if the reference to a certain place is obvious." In this case, "where" means a condition or situation. Help!
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68 views

Is using “maybe” in combination with a conjugation of “to be” bad style?

I've read this answer about the difference between “maybe” and “may be”. It contains the sentence “maybe he is in the office today” as a correct example. In the above example “maybe” and “is” is ...
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3answers
78 views

Is there any archaic word for “finally”?

So I was wondering whether there is any archaic word that means "finally" or "at last"?
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5answers
42k views

Is it correct to say “I kindly request you to…”?

Isn't kindness already implied when you say "I request you to..."? When I say "I humbly request you to...", the word humbly helps me to label the state of my behavior during the request. On the ...
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Speak Slower or Speak Slowlier?

AFAIK the correct grammar for "speak slow" is "speak slowly" (slowly being an adverb). Please correct me if I am mistaken. But in daily life I have not heard anyone saying "Speak slowlier". I think ...
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80 views

“Beautiful” or “beautifully” [closed]

Should I say You look beautifully today or You look beautiful today? In my opinion, the first form is correct because beautifully describes the verb and not the noun. Thus, I should use the beautiful ...
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What adverb should replace 'neater'?

What's wrong with 'this could have been written a lot neater'? John Snow talks about this in the latest Intellgence Squared debate, and mentions that, if he were being a pedant, an adverb should have ...
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2answers
61 views

An adverb challenge

I was set the challenge to provide one particular adverb that can be used as verb modifier, adjective modifier and adverb modifier, and an example of its use in each of the cases. In addition the ...
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What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”?

What part of speech does here have in the following sentence? I am here. I say that in that sentence, here must be an adverb because: It modifies the verb am by describing where I am. Am is a ...
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63 views

Is there a difference between “good” and “well” when they are connected to subject via linking verb? [duplicate]

marked as duplicate by Edwin Ashworth, David M, RyeɃreḁd, Brian Hooper, tchrist This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your ...
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4answers
3k views

“Adverbial phrase” vs “Adverbial clause”

Please tell me what the difference is between an adverbial phrase and an adverbial clause.
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80 views

Need a word for "Should not have happened' with a negative context

I'm looking for a word to mean "should not have happened." I'm trying to relate this situation; two paths - one positive, one negative - with the same end result, and the negative path was taken. ...
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Question on “Out of”

In "out of", is the "out" considered a preposition or an adverb?
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Translating Gerunds from Spanish to English (verb+ing)

In Spanish, the gerund form (-ando, -endo) is frequently used adverbially to modify and describe the verb: El alma es dichosa dando y sirviendo. El niño anda bailando. El artista vive provocando ...
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3answers
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When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
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2answers
82 views

Should I use a hyphen after -ly when modifying a verb in the past participle verb?

Which of these are acceptable? Is one preferable over the other? "Chemically-deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." "Chemically deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." Also, is the title to ...
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Use of an ~ing form with another verb

I'm not sure how to describe the use of the bolded words in the following cases: Pete is happy singing a song Anna talked screaming Mike entered the room screaming and laughing Is it ...
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3k views

What is the correct usage of “meanwhile”?

I see meanwhile a lot; I use it a lot; yet I'm not sure about the formal rules when it's applicable. Can anyone help me?
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2answers
69 views

Is “like” used as an adjective by native speakers?

Do native speakers use like as an adjective? Is it a preferred usage?
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666 views

Indian English use of “only”

I am from Bangalore and people here tend use the word only to emphasise something in a sentence. For example: We are getting that only printed. What is the proper way to put it?