An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Is it poor style to use adverbs ending in “ly” in formal writing?

I came across this infographic which contains the following claim: Some grammarians consider "ly" ending adverbs as bad style in formal writing. Are there any serious style advice sources that ...
1
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2answers
512 views

Using “yet” and “still”

When someone says, The changes have to be updated. someone may reply, Those changes need to be made but the plan to make those changes does not yet exist. (as sometimes found) Is it ...
0
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2answers
416 views

Word order with “just” and “only” meaning “merely”

Marking a German student's test I have encountered the following problem: The relationship between the two adolescents is one-sided. Just the boy really feels something, the girl hates him. Can ...
0
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2answers
936 views

Adverb word order: “nicely shows” vs “shows nicely”

I have the following sentence in my dissertation: The even-tempered STO basis for Mg shows nicely why the virial theorem cannot be trusted as an error indicator. However, previously I had there: ...
1
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1answer
165 views

meaning and usage of “in order the more” [closed]

I have just come across a phrase I have never seen before: I do not so in order to undermine the status of xy but, on the contrary, in order the more securely to identify certain aspects. A ...
3
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3answers
829 views

Is “five-yearly” an acceptable usage of an adverb of manner in British English?

Today's BBC News web page has this headline: New era of five-yearly doctor checks starts There's a word that means "five-yearly": quinquennial. It's probably too long for headline writers and ...
6
votes
1answer
883 views

Adverb vs. direct object [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What exactly is an “adverb”? Consider the following sentences: She went home. He swam yesterday. Are the words "home" and "yesterday" adverbs or direct ...
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2answers
716 views

Exact definition of “vehemently” [closed]

My work mates and I are arguing about this term since none of us can comprehend its exact definition. Can I use the expression "I have been struggling vehemently to get this email sent since last ...
-2
votes
2answers
3k views

Starting a sentence with “apparently” [closed]

Can one start a sentence with the word apparently? For example: Apparently he did not pay him back. I know that one should not start a sentence with because, but what are some words that one ...
3
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2answers
541 views

Position of “now”

What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences? This feature is now disabled. This feature is disabled now.
2
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4answers
1k views

The use of “about” on “discuss” and “think”

Why is it grammatically incorrect to say We would like to discuss about the matters at hands first. But it is alright to say I will think about what you have said this morning. What ...
2
votes
2answers
292 views

Etymology of 'just' as an adverb and its French connection

Just (adj.): late 14c., "righteous in the eyes of God; upright, equitable, impartial; justifiable, reasonable," from O.Fr. juste "just, righteous; sincere" (12c.), from L. iustus "upright, ...
3
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3answers
6k views

“Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”

I've heard both phrases in everyday speech, so there's little doubt in my mind that the answer is both. I suspect, though, that one of these phrases is more the original than the other, and the other ...
-1
votes
2answers
625 views

Using “henceforth” to refer to future events, but from a “past perspective”

The title isn't great, sorry, I couldn't really come up with anything better :D Here's a bit of context: I'm working on my thesis and am currently writing down the historical evolution of a certain ...
4
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3answers
544 views

Placement of the word “later” in a sentence

Why is it correct to say "it later came to pass" instead of "it came to pass later"? What is the rule for this placement?
0
votes
1answer
87 views

“Every” being used instead of “ever”?

Occasionally I'll see a comment on the internet along the lines of I don't think I have every heard of such a thing. Maybe not exactly that, but something equivalent where I would think that ...
4
votes
2answers
572 views

Compound adjectives functioning as adverbs modifying other adjectives; is it possible and grammatical?

Soul-crushingly bad; heartbreakingly sad; bone-crunchingly violent; etc. I swear I have seen it done, but I am not sure whether it's proper grammar or not.
4
votes
3answers
91 views

“Really” modification problems

I can read a French newspaper with the aid of a dictionary, but I cannot speak the language or understand it when spoken. So I do not really know French. Some people say that really modifies know; ...
3
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8answers
967 views

What is the opposite of using something judiciously?

I want to tell a colleague to use a particular file wherever possible. Basically the opposite of using it judiciously. I ended up saying "use the file at will" — but it got me wondering if there ...
1
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2answers
97 views

“Far enough removed” vs. “far removed enough” vs. “removed far enough”

Which of the following word orders is grammatical? Games based on real life are sometimes not far enough removed. Games based on real life are sometimes not far removed enough. Games based ...
3
votes
2answers
6k views

Adverbs position in English: “place–manner–time” or “manner–place–time”?

Wikipedia tells us that the order should be place–manner–time. However, this webpage tells that it should be manner–Place–Time. Which one is correct? I have one sentence in two different orders: ...
3
votes
3answers
577 views

Alternative phrase to “highly paid job”

James: I make 10000 USD a month. Alice: Wow, you have a highly paid job. Is the phrase “highly paid job” correct? I think yes, but also wish to ask the native speakers here. I assume that ...
2
votes
4answers
791 views

Is this usage of “inside” correct?

This text is taken from a children's reader. It's about some children who find a doll house that is an exact reproduction of their home. Biff opened the little house. Everyone looked inside. "It ...
0
votes
2answers
752 views

-er rather than -lier as an adverbial comparative form

In modern German, one can make tief into the comparative tiefer, regardless of whether the word is used as adjective or adverb. In English, I now have a sentence in which I want to do the same thing ...
5
votes
3answers
319 views

What's the adjective for “by distance”?

If I had to describe a state that occurred only for a certain amount of time, I'd simply use the adjective "temporary" to describe the state (or the adverb "temporarily" to describe the verb). What ...
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4answers
2k views

Put the words in the correct order to make question [closed]

I am not a native speaker. I am doing the exercise "Put the words in the correct order to make question" from my workbook. I have this set of words: your / best / see / did / friend / when / ...
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votes
2answers
762 views

Subject-auxiliary inversions not associated with questions [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Inversion in “only [adverb] have they” Is there some rule governing the following, or similar, subject-auxiliary inversions (*"Rarely they do see the light of day", ...
10
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3answers
790 views

Does the word “apparently” imply that I personally do or don't believe the statement following it?

When I say "Apparently, xyz", does that imply one of the following, and if so, which one? From observation, I believe xyz to be true, but I leave open the possibility that I might be wrong. I ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Adverb position in perfect tenses [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence? My question concerns the adverb position in perfect tenses. For example look at these ...
0
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1answer
121 views

Reword “increasingly too late”

How should I fix a sentence which says "As X disappears, it is increasingly too late to do Y with X"? The sentence seems awkward to me, but "too late" is an adjective, so is the sentence ...
2
votes
2answers
156 views

Avoiding “time-controlledly” as an adverb

I'm currently translating a web site for scheduling software from German to English. So there are many things that this program can do "time-controlledly" (if I translate literally). But this sounds ...
6
votes
1answer
4k views

“Hence” and “hence why”

My question is, is the use of the word "hence", used in it's most common sense as an alternative to "therefore", strictly acceptable in English usage in the following example: I like bananas, ...
9
votes
3answers
3k views

The Royal Order of Adverbs

I know that the pattern manner-place-time shouldn't be taken too seriously if one wants to speak natural English. In real life, people rarely use a string of adverbs. Speakers will easily break the ...
0
votes
2answers
6k views

“Not the same as” vs. “not the same like” [closed]

"Not the same as" and "not the same like" sound both strange to me (non-native speaker). Google finds both versions. Are both okay? Is this phrasing used anyway or would people go for "different ...
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3answers
117 views

Use of comma after “accidentally” [closed]

Is a comma required after accidentally? I accidentally sent you the wrong number.
10
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1answer
8k views

Yes, no, adverbs, and interjections

There appears to be some disagreement over what function yes and no perform in the following sentences: Yes, you are right. No, you are mistaken. According to ODO (yes, no), they are being used as ...
1
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2answers
611 views

Do 'already' and 'just' require the present perfect?

Compare: 'We already gave him a response'. 'We have already given him a response'. Do 'already' and 'just' strictly require the present perfect?
2
votes
4answers
389 views

How to pronounce “linearly”?

As the title states, how do I pronounce the word "Linearly"? I did some Google searching on this but I was not able to find any guidance.
10
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3answers
4k views

Speak Slower or Speak Slowlier?

AFAIK the correct grammar for "speak slow" is "speak slowly" (slowly being an adverb). Please correct me if I am mistaken. But in daily life I have not heard anyone saying "Speak slowlier". I think ...
0
votes
3answers
871 views

Use “underway” or “under way” as an adverb?

Is it proper to use underway as an adverb? Or should under way be used? Merriam-Webster defines underway as an adjective and under way as an adverb. The Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & ...
15
votes
3answers
714 views

“You just can't” vs. “you can't just ”

I'm a bit confused about this. Which expression is correct? You can't just do that. or You just can't do that. I'm trying to say: You can't just bash an ideology because of what ...
1
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2answers
781 views

Is the phrase “then too” incorrect?

I was told by a school teacher that it was incorrect. I've seen it in articles coming from reputable sources. The general meaning would be similar to the word 'yet', but I can't find any place to ...
3
votes
3answers
6k views

the difference between “really” and “very”

Is the statement below true about the difference between really and very when really means “very” in the example “It’s very/really hot in the summer”? “Really” shows more involvement, even ...
4
votes
5answers
507 views

Which adverb implies supreme confidence, falling just shy of arrogance?

When he participated in debates and round table discussions, Christopher Hitchens spoke with supreme confidence. I'd like to replace with supreme confidence with an adverb that implies supreme ...
3
votes
3answers
951 views

Usage of “already” and “yet”

I want to know the difference between already and yet in this example: I was surprised that they had __ to decide what to do. My answer on this question was already and my teacher marked it as ...
4
votes
3answers
770 views

“Absolute” or “absolutely”?

This question is related to programming, but this seemed a better place to post it than Stack Overflow. To style HTML pages, we frequently deal with positioning, and two common values for the CSS ...
6
votes
4answers
29k views

Get hold of, get ahold of, get a hold of

Under what circumstances would you prefer one of the below over others? a) Get hold of, b) Get ahold of, c) Get a hold of
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7answers
2k views

What exactly is an “adverb”?

From comments to “Weekdays” used as an adverb", I learn that The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary says "open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.", shows the word weekdays is an adverb. It seems to me ...
5
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4answers
584 views

“Weekdays” used as an adverb

I found a sentence in Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary: open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The bookstore opens weekdays from 9 p.m. to 6 p.m. . How do we understand the structure of ...
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3answers
1k views

Is “now” grammatical in “Have you now spoken to him?”?

Have you now spoken to him? I really heard that from someone.