An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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What does “barely” imply?

When someone says, I barely understand that. Does he mean: He almost doesn't understand [which means he understands a bit] He almost understands [which means he doesn't understand] ...
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Is it more correct to say “You have not yet <actioned>” or “You have not <actioned> yet”?

Having seen Correct placing and usage of "yet", it sounds like it may be correct to say either "You have not created any items yet." or "You have not yet created any items." Is one more ...
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413 views

Which position does “really” and “quite” go?

I know really is an adverb, and one that intensifies the verb. I also know that some adverbs go only in the beginning; in the middle or at the end of a sentence, and some can be placed in all three ...
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I have been sick for the last week? [closed]

I' would like to know whether or not the following sentences are correct and why: I have been sick since last week. I have been sick since the last week. I have been sick for the last ...
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Why has the word “thrice” fallen out of common usage?

I'm an American living in America, but my workplace has a lot of immigrants from India here. They all use "thrice" very commonly, which is wonderful to my ears! Thrice is such a delightful word. ...
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Are hyphens needed in a noun-phrase that precedes 'manner'? [duplicate]

I sometimes use "manner" to use noun-phrases as adverbs, like "in the manner of a vigilant watchdog". If I reverse the order, does the noun phrase then have to be hypenated? Like so: "in a ...
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132 views

Part of speech and usage of “in person”

Is "in person" an adjective or adverb, describing the person or the action being done? The artist will be in person, painting. The artist will be painting in person. Which is correct?
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When to use wrong or wrongly as adverbs? [duplicate]

It seems that wrong is not only an adjective, but is also a proper adverb ("You're doing it wrong!", right?). There's, however, an adverb wrongly, which probably means the same thing. Talking about ...
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Why isn't “safely disposing” written as “safe disposing” instead?

The cost of safely disposing of the toxic chemicals is approximately five times what the company paid to purchase them. The -ing and of seem indicate that "disposing" is a noun, and since ...
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194 views

some time vs sometime

Is there a rule for "some time" vs "sometime"? For example: Don’t trust your memory to recall noteworthy situations and events some time (sometime) later.
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How do you modify an adverb with another adverb?

This is the case I have in mind. I wish to express that impact acted in a way that was severely adverse. It impacted her severely adversely. The proposed text above doesn't feel right at all, ...
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How does one decide whether an adverb of manner should precede or follow the verb?

How does one decide whether an adverb of manner should precede or follow the verb? In some cases, it seems to be more natural to have the adverb follow the verb, as in: “She moved slowly and spoke ...
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Adverb for a person who is not the subject

If I went home and was happy to do so, I can say that "I went home happily". If I sent somebody else home and he was happy to do so, can I say that "I sent Johnny home happily"? This doesn't sound ...
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4k views

The position of “always” in different sentences [closed]

I want to know about the position of always in different sentences. For example: Always she is tidy and on time. Is it correct or not?
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552 views

Positive and negative clause comparison in the same sentence

What is the right way to perform a positive and a negative adverb comparison in the beginning of the sentence? As an example, which of the following ways is correct: Similarly to yesterday, and ...
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2answers
93 views

Usage of 'bovinely' when fastness or slowness are involved

I know that in English 'I tried to go as slow as possible' and 'I tried to go as fast as possible' have a very different meaning, but I'm unsure how 'bovinely', before 'possible', change that ...
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49 views

“Down for” something vs. “Up for” something? [duplicate]

Is there any difference between someone saying they're "down for" something as opposed to being "up for" something? For example: I'm totally up for ice cream tonight! vs. I'm totally down ...
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Doubtless or doubtlessly?

To my surprise I found that doubtless is used as an adverb without appending the "-ly". Doubtless, some of you will know more examples. It feels wrong, but then again, I am not a native ...
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I was wondering whether it is acceptable to put the adverb “rudely” in the following three places in this sentence

sentence: The man looked at me. 1 The man looked at me rudely. 2 The man rudely looked at me. 3 The man looked rudely at me.
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“Went to school happily” vs. “happily went to school” vs. “went happily to school” [duplicate]

The boy went to school happily. The boy happily went to school. The boy went happily to school. If the adverb “happily” is allowed to be put in the three places above, what are the ...
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2answers
383 views

What are the differences between “go to school happily”, “go happily to school” and “happily go to school”?

There are three similar phrases which I would like to know the differences between: go to school happily go happily to school happily go to school I have long been confused by the ...
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Inversion or no inversion after “only”?

Only now you can even get them on top of wrinkles. Only infrequently does it happen. As one of our members has said, inversion happens when a sentence starts with "only" and never ...
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A word meaning “To bring out of retirement” / “To bring back into use”

(Re)instate? -- Seems too specific. (Re-)employ? -- Seems to apply to both machines and people, which is useful. But re-employ seems too general. Activate? -- Seems most appropriate perhaps, although ...
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3answers
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“put your coat on” and “put on your coat” but not “depend on someone” and “depend someone on*”

Why can you say "put on your coat" and "put your coat on" but not "depend on someone" and "depend someone on*"? Why are adverbs ("on" in the first sentence) mobile, whereas prepositions ("on" in the ...
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'but' for contrast and 'but' for opposition

'But' does not mean the same thing in "I like pop music but my parents like classical music." and in "My parents have played a lot of classical music to me but I still don't like it." What is it ...
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135 views

“distinguish them more completely” vs. “more completely distinguish them”

Is there a rule I could tell the difference between: Both A and B have other attributes that distinguish them more completely. Both A and B have other attributes that more completely ...
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'Eventually' — in the past or by some point in the future

Consider the following exchange: Alice: Did Charlotte send you that email? Bob: No, but I'm sure she'll send it eventually. In this case, there's no upper bound on the period of time in which ...
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208 views

Where should I put “this afternoon” here in this sentence?

Sentence1: If, this afternoon, it is as sunny as it is now, we will go out. Sentence2: If it is as sunny this afternoon as it is now, we will go out. My question is which sentence is better. Where ...
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What is correct “Blazing Fast Speed” or “Blazingly Fast Speed”?

Which is correct? "Blazing Fast Speed" or "Blazingly Fast Speed"? In my opinion, the latter because one can't say, for one, "Amazing Fast Speed", right? Admittedly NY Times use it a lot but...: NY ...
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adverbs modifying noun phrases and licensing their own complements

[i] Harry looked down at his empty gold plate. He had only just realized how hungry he was. The pumpkin pasties seemed ages ago. (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) [ii] Albus Dumbledore ...
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He truly is great or he is truly great?

Where is the correct place to put the "is"? I speak several languages and get confused when switching from one to the other.
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46 views

“I love this version the best” or “I love this version the most”? [duplicate]

"I love this version the best" or "I love this version the most"? Are these both normative constructions? I have come to the realization that I am not sure whether "love this the best" is ...
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5answers
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Is “almost exactly” correct English?

Is the collocation "almost exactly" grammatical, when one is trying to express that something is almost at the edge of being exact? E.g.: ...and it's almost exactly like...
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What is the comparative form of the adverb “nicely”?

The adjective nice can be inflected: nicer, nicest. Can the derived adverb nicely be inflected as well, or does it only have the absolute form?
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783 views

As quick as we can?

Is it acceptable to say "We'll get back to you as quick as we can"? Is "quick" a flat adverb in this case?
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285 views

Substitution of adverb by another “equivalent” word?

In the sentence: Her voice sounds beautiful. She sang the song exactly as it was written. We heard it perfectly. Isn't it feasible to substitute the last word by "perfect"? In Spanish both ways are ...
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Is “wrongly” even a word? [closed]

I came across a news article using the word wrongly. I was told that wrongly isn't a real word. But I saw this in a leading newspaper and wanted a clarification. Also, what is the difference between ...
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“Adverbial phrase” vs “Adverbial clause”

Please tell me what the difference is between an adverbial phrase and an adverbial clause.
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285 views

Is “ignorably” a word?

I would like to use ignorably as the adverb of ignorable but I am not sure whether this is correct. I did not find ignorably in any online dictionary. To give the context: Normally, you cannot ignore ...
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has just had or just had a baby

My question is not whether the correct grammar is either "She has just had a baby" or "She just had a baby". I am aware that the official grammar is "She has just had a baby". But in a way that ...
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Which is correct “increasingly easy” or “increasingly easier” [duplicate]

I was wondering which of the following is correct increasingly easy or increasingly easier. I had a notion that increasingly easier is correct since we are comparing with the past. However, this and ...
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“They had already decided what to do” vs. “they had decided what to do already”

I was surprised that they had already decided what to do. I was surprised that they had decided what to do already. Which sentence is correct?
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1answer
144 views

Bad or Badly, which is correct? [duplicate]

Consider this sentence: I want to join the contest.. Which is more correct, "so bad" or "so badly"? I'm leaning towards the latter because it is an adverb and an adverb is required to describe ...
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2answers
165 views

Placing “first” in a sentence; would it change the meaning?

How does the meaning of the following two sentences differ? I first wanted to tell you about it. I wanted to tell you about it first.
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1answer
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Do all variations of this sentence seem grammatically correct? [duplicate]

There is an interesting English sentence which is making rounds in the social media nowadays. It goes like this: For the following sentence, add the word "only" anywhere in this sentence, and ...
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5answers
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“physically attractive” vs. “attractive physically”

I have come across the following sentence in a dictionary: Though not very attractive physically, she possessed a good sense of humour. I think the adverb "physically" postmodifies the ...
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3answers
398 views

“Currently the environment is so contaminated” vs. “the environment is currently so contaminated”

Currently the environment is so contaminated that urgent measures should be taken. The environment is currently so contaminated that urgent measures should be taken. Are both sentences ...
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What does “enough” mean in expressions like “Fair enough” or “Funny enough”?

As a non-native speaker, I already get used to the word enough in expressions like those below, but I sometimes still got confused of it. It makes me wonder what it actually means and where does it ...
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“There are still problems” vs. “there still are problems”

There are still problems. There still are problems. Is one word order more correct than the other and do they have identical meaning?
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2answers
84 views

Which degree should be used? [closed]

Which degree of 'less' is correct in the following sentence - "Seats in this room are much less/lesser in comparison to the adjacent one." Also please state any general rule of English if it is being ...