An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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“Recently” vs. “lately”

I haven't seen Mr. John __. Which is correct, recently or lately? My uncle has been to Germany lately. Why is the correct answer in the second example lately and not recently?
2
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1answer
97 views

“Thence” to allude to the past

I see that "hence" means roughly "from this fact/time/place/source", while "thence" means roughly "from that fact/time/place/source". Usage such as "half an hour hence" is typically (although perhaps ...
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4answers
246 views

“It can be safely deleted” vs. “It can safely be deleted”

Is there a subtle difference between the following two sentences? It can be safely deleted. It can safely be deleted. If they mean the same thing, is one preferred for other reasons?
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1answer
70 views

scattered from, against, or by? [closed]

A quick Google search gives me the following sentences: An electron is scattered from a nucleus. An electron is scattered against a nucleus. An electron is scattered by a nucleus. Which one is ...
8
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2answers
529 views

“Each” — pronoun or adverb

I am looking at these two sentences: M and W are letters that each have 4 strokes. M and W are letters and each has 4 strokes. It seems that each is an adverb in (1) but a pronoun in ...
4
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0answers
119 views

He began to breathe deep / deeply [duplicate]

This is from Light in August, by W. Faulkner, Chapter 18: He began to breathe deep. He could feel himself breathing deep, (...) This confused me deep. (This is related but not an answer to my ...
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3answers
620 views

Payment to be due within three months “of” that meeting

Does the word "of" in the context of an established point in time refer to before or after that established point in time?
6
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2answers
476 views

A word for something that's done only half-consciously

In writing fiction, I find myself using the word "absentmindedly" a lot, but I don't think it's really the word I'm looking for. I'm not looking so much something done in a distracted manner, but ...
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1answer
775 views

If you place an ly adverb after the verb is the meaning different than if it were infront of the verb? [duplicate]

For example: I did not respond physically I did not physically respond I can't escape the sense that #2 'strongly' leaves open the possibility (or implies) that the writer responded some way ...
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2answers
473 views

What's the difference between “She came home angry” and “She came home angrily” [closed]

Are these two sentences grammatically correct? What's the difference between them? She came home angry She came home angrily
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1answer
91 views

“The paper on Monday published X” vs. “the paper published on Monday X”

What would be the best position of Monday in the following sentence — before or after the verb? The paper on Monday published what the artist called a blunt attack on people’s right to privacy. ...
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1answer
262 views

“Would of course be” vs. “of course would be” [duplicate]

I am not sure about the position of 'of course' inside a sentence. Please consider these two versions and comment on that: A comprehensive documentation would of course be highly valuable... ...
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1answer
2k views

Term for verb+adverb with distinct meaning

There are verbs that, when paired with certain adverbs, can have a distinctly different meaning. For example, I looked up the word in the dictionary. The phrase looked up functions as a verb ...
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11answers
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Is the usage of 'personally' in 'I personally don't like something' redundant?

What is the difference between the following? I personally don't like wax museums. I don't like wax museums. The adverb personally does not seem to emphasize anything here. Is it ...
3
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2answers
773 views

Where to place 'only' relative to prepositions?

I know that questions about the placement of 'only', are often asked here; accordingly, I searched for an answer to my question before posting it. Question Where are focusing adverbs placed relative ...
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2answers
6k views

Meaning of “excited much”, “stalker much”

What does 'excited much' or 'stalker much' mean exactly, and which context are they used in? I don't get the usage of much after a noun or adjective. I often see this construction in comments, for ...
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6answers
10k views

“I kindly ask to” vs “I ask to kindly”

Let's take the following two sentences as examples: I kindly ask you to send the letter to your boss. I ask you to kindly send the letter to your boss. It would be kind of you to send the letter to ...
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2answers
149 views

“I only have discovered today” vs. “I only today have discovered” vs. “I have only today discovered”

Since I am not a native English speaker it's hard to find anything related to this topic on google. Which of the following word orders is grammatical? I only have discovered today we have a ...
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3answers
361 views

“Previously” vs. “last time”

What is the difference between the following two sentences? This is the vendor from which the item was purchased the last time. This is the vendor from which the item was purchased ...
2
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1answer
144 views

“Feeling well” adverb ambiguity

Am I just crazy, or is there some ambiguity in the phrase "feeling well"? Example: Billy has a genetic defect that causes him to lose sensation in his fingertips every few days, or so. "How are you ...
2
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0answers
4k views

For ever and forever [closed]

What is the difference between the meaning and usage of for ever and forever in British English? From what I could gather from my online research, forever means : (also for ever) for all ...
2
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3answers
1k views

Is it right to use comma before “here”?

Members of parliament can criticize other members, here. Note the comma after members and before here. In this particular case, is it okay? Or should the comma not be there?
2
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1answer
8k views

Difference between: Also, too and as well [duplicate]

I understand that the correct usage of also is with a verb: She was smart, she also studied so much. However, my trouble is with too and as well, I have been reading and I just found that as ...
3
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3answers
618 views

Elision in the pronunciation of “probably”

A student of mine has pointed out that in casual speech, my tendency is to pronounce the word "probably" as something like prah-lee. I am a native speaker of American English without a specific ...
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1answer
969 views

Pronunciation of “again”

What is the Standard British English1 pronunciation of "again"? I looked in Wiktionary and it gives two UK pronunciations, /əˈɡeɪn/, and /əˈɡɛn/. 1 I mean Standard British English as in the tag ...
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1answer
611 views

Is downtown an adverb of place? [duplicate]

What is the explanation for why we say "I'm going downtown" instead of "I'm going to downtown?"
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2answers
1k views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
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1answer
7k views

“Firstly, secondly” vs. “Firstly, lastly” when listing just two points

Normally, if we which to illustrate our points, we can use firstly, secondly, lastly (or last but not least or finally). There are a few pieces of information we need to notice: Firstly, ...
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2answers
1k views

'Statistically significant associated to' — [Adv + Adj] as Adv?

Is 'XXX is statistically significant associated to YYY.' grammatically correct ? One of my friends says this is seen in many papers with statistics. Shouldn't it be '... statistically significantly ...
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1answer
2k views

“Sent” vs “sent off” vs “sent out”

When do we use one over another? I sent a letter. I sent off a letter. I sent out a letter. Here I found a similar topic but I am still confused. sent = sent to one or more people ...
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1answer
649 views

Can “above” be used as an adjective? [duplicate]

I've read in some English grammar books that the word above can only act as an adverb. It can never be used as an adjective in any context. For example: 1) The above example explains it well. ...
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2answers
280 views

What role does 'in' take in this sentence?

Father: “It may not be exactly the car you want but..” Daughter: “It’ll be rubbish, some old wreck that I’ll look totally stupid in.” (BBC, The Archers, 2013-04-26 Friday, 8’55”~9’01”) Does ...
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3answers
4k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
4
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3answers
227 views

“The same X” and intransitive verbs

As I have had explained to me at great length, wonder is intransitive. That's fine, but it can seem to take an object: Jim: Yesterday I wondered what that mark on the wall was made by Dave: I ...
4
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2answers
251 views

The adverb “away” for continuity or repetitiveness

I would like to ask about the adverbial particle "away" meaning continuity or repetitiveness (i.e. not a location, a distance, a change of position etc.). When used with some atelic verbs, the ...
2
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2answers
8k views

“Talk to you then then”

I am talking to a friend on the phone and the conversation is somewhat incomplete but we decide to hang up. Before hanging up, he says "I'll see you tomorrow". Would it be grammatical to reply, ...
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3answers
812 views

“Above” or “later” when referencing a range of versions of software

Which is correct when referencing an operating system version "OS X 10.6.x and later" or "OS X 10.6.x and above"? Bonus points for providing the why.
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0answers
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Which one is correct, 'I like this more' or 'I like this better'? [duplicate]

I feel that using 'I like this name more' is more correct than 'I like this name better'. Since English is not my mother tongue, I am not sure.
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1answer
870 views

“more people becoming increasingly xxx” or “more people increasingly becoming xxx”

I need a bit of guidance regarding the following sentence. Which of the three variants is grammatical? Are more people becoming increasingly intolerant? Are more people increasingly becoming ...
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2answers
769 views

“Sometimes also” or “also sometimes”?

I have a sentence where I think I could use either of these two constructions. They seem very similar in meaning, so I'm not sure which I should prefer. There might be some subtle point of grammar ...
8
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6answers
808 views

What is “long” doing in “all (time-period) long”?

What part of speech is long playing the part of in the bold parts of the quotations below? For one thing, it shows at a glance how much money is on hand for any particular purpose all month long. ...
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5answers
5k views

Can an adverb be a noun at the same time?

In this sentence: Ben and Jen went home. Is home both an adverb and a noun?
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1answer
342 views

“Ever” vs “Always”

I have read that always is more used in American English, while ever is more used in British English. In this context, which of the following is correct: This always increasing interest brought. . ...
4
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1answer
8k views

“Lately” and “recently” in Present Perfect

If I use Present Perfect Progressive and Present Perfect with an expression of unfinished time, it implies that the action is continuing. But what about recently and lately — when used with ...
6
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5answers
8k views

What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”?

What part of speech does here have in the following sentence? I am here. I say that in that sentence, here must be an adverb because: It modifies the verb am by describing where I am. Am is a ...
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2answers
210 views

Using “meantime” as an adjective

Does it make sense to say: Please consider this email as a meantime brief report. If yes, why? and if no, how can it be fixed? Edit By the above sentence, I want to say that this email is not ...
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1answer
963 views

Is “in about” grammatical in “I'll reach there in about 5 minutes”?

Is it correct to say "I'll reach there in about 5 minutes?" Is "in about" correct in this sentence?
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0answers
375 views

Why does a negative adverbial phrase trigger inversion? [duplicate]

When a negative adverb (or adverbial phrase) is placed at the beginning of a sentence, we exchange the normal placement of subject and verb. Why is that?
2
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4answers
148 views

Proper English for “started shooting anywhere” [closed]

What's the proper word to describe someone shooting anywhere around in order to kill as many as possible: The terrorists entered the room and started shooting ________, 5 were killed, 1 injured.
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5answers
1k views

Indian English use of “only”

I am from Bangalore and people here tend use the word only to emphasise something in a sentence. For example: We are getting that only printed. What is the proper way to put it?