An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Is this usage of “however” with an adjective correct?

Is the word "however" correctly used in this sentence? If not, how could it be rephrased? This program, however comprehensive, hasn't been updated for a long time. Is there a better construct to ...
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Use of a semicolon before and comma after “however”

Several years ago, a previous boss told me to use a semicolon and comma with the word "however". I've always questioned this and would like to know if the following random sentences are using the ...
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275 views

Is “regardless” a word I shouldn't use? [closed]

Is it true that "regardless" is a word I shouldn't use because it is obsolete? If it is, what shall I use instead?
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629 views

Four-word phrase stress

I'm interested to learn why the following four-word phrases have stress on different words. "Little Red Riding Hood" (stress is on little and riding) "Infamous National Rifle Association" ...
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126 views

With + adverb structure

The strange example makes me confused - with + adverb : "Red items need dealing with immediately after the process..." How correct and common of this structure?
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328 views

Adverbs right after the subject [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should an adverb go before or after a verb? Is it correct to write a sentence this way? Now we can speak about the steps that I’ve previously listed. Or it would ...
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2k views

What is the difference between “so much” and “quite so much”?

I was told that "so much" is more emphatic than "quite so much", but I am not sure. Could you explain the difference between the following pairs of sentences? Don't put so much emphasis on that ...
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“First off” vs “first”

First off we need to write down a word; second we need... First we need to write down a word; second we need... What's the subtle difference between "first off" and "first"? Moreover, ...
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3answers
258 views

“I went to bed hungry” vs. “I went to bed hungrily” [closed]

What is the exact difference between "I went to bed hungry" and "I went to bed hungrily"?
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1answer
1k views

Word to describe things that run after each other [closed]

Is there a word to describe tasks that need to "run one after the other"? My current choice is sequentially, but feel there is a better word.
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145k views

Is it “peek”, “peak” or “pique”?

I have always thought the phrase was "pique my interest" as in: "Her mysterious background piqued my interest". However, of late, on blogs and social networks, I have seen people using "peek my ...
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338 views

Do adverbs only describe verbs?

Egypt and Tunisia have both taken steps to form a new government after the overthrow of Mubarak and Ben Ali respectively. In this context, does respectively describe the steps that have been ...
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Correct usage of “yet” in the middle of the sentence [closed]

Is the following sentence a correct usage of yet? I'm someone like you, and yet like no one. I think it matches the last definition of OAAD, more importantly. But I also think the comma and and ...
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328 views

Grammaticality of “I have a car, neither does Sara” [closed]

Can we say "I have a red car. Neither does Sara." or must we say "I have a red car but Sara doesn't."? I have read this on a website and they said that the first sentence is incorrect but I don't ...
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141 views

“In avoiding failure” vs. “For avoiding failure”?

1: In avoiding failure, we must be careful. 2: For avoiding failure, we must be careful. What are the subtle differences between the two sentences?
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29 views

Difference between the two sentences? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” I got confused between these two centences: I answered only four questions in my exam. I only answered four questions in my exam. ...
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3answers
633 views

“I was really thinking” vs. “I really was thinking”

Which one of the following is correct? I was really thinking to do that. I really was thinking to do that.
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1answer
2k views

Is there a name for misusing a word (e.g., saying “Provincially, yes”)? [closed]

I read a mail in which someone replied to the question "Will he be attending the party?" by saying "Provincially, yes". Provincial means "of or concerning the regions outside the capital city of a ...
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2answers
8k views

“I did it by myself” vs “I did it myself” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Myself vs by myself "I did it by myself" and "I did it myself"; what's the exact and subtle difference between the two?
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6answers
298 views

Looking for a formal equivalent phrase for the adverb “personally”

Which one is correct: "personal basis" or "individual basis"? I want to use it in a formal letter. I want to say: "I don't know Mr. X on a personal basis (or individual basis) and I have not had an ...
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508 views

Why does the word “inadvertently” mean “not knowingly”?

The root is advertently. That means “knowingly”. Fair enough. The root of advertently is advertent. That means “attention”. Hmmm … quite close. The root of advertent is advert, which means ...
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742 views

“Enables you to quickly and easily identify” vs. “enables you to identify quickly and easily” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? I'm currently having a bit of a dispute and would appreciate your help please. Which one is ...
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439 views

“Will shortly appear automatically” — what is the correct order of words in this fragment?

I want to say that an answer will appear shortly, and automatically, on the screen. I'm not sure whether the correct sentence is: The answer will shortly appear automatically. or maybe: The ...
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“The Cry of Jousts of King Richard II” — a problem with translation

I'm trying to translate this text to Polish and everything seems pretty clear to me, apart from the usage of the words "within" and "without". I presume it's some kind of technical vocabulary ...
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Most is adjective or adverb, comparative or superlative in the following phrase?

In the following phrase, from the 1971 film "The Devils" by Ken Russell, what is "most"? An adjective or an adverb? And in what form, comparative or superlative? I conjure thee, most frightful ...
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Is it possible to say ' your choice *for* something' when you mean 'your choice *of* something'?

I'm correcting a document and several people that co-wrote it seem to agree that 'my choice for' seems to be synonymous to 'my choice of', in the signification of me having chosen something and ...
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180 views

Exact meaning of “You are brand new”? [closed]

I run across a phrase of "You are brand new to GitHub" on the web. What makes me confused is the word "brand"; is it a noun, an adjective or an adverb?
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“I need to wash my hands bad[ly]” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you” I'm terrible at the usage of bad vs. badly. Given the sentence: I need to wash my hands bad[ly]. Should the ...
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3answers
816 views

You don't want to answer this word-placement question, now do you?

Prompted by this question I got to thinking about the placement of the word now. If it's placed before the comma, it refers to an immediate condition: You don't want to answer this word-placement ...
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1answer
270 views

Positioning “only” in “I have worked with X” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Which of the following sentences are correct? I have worked with only Mr. X. I have worked only with Mr. X. I have only worked with ...
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Place of an adverb in the passive present perfect progressive

I was wondering where an adverb should (or could) be placed in the passive present perfect progressive in English. I have been being carefully tickled. OR I have been carefully being ...
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Is it correct to say “I kindly request you to…”?

Isn't kindness already implied when you say "I request you to..."? When I say "I humbly request you to...", the word humbly helps me to label the state of my behavior during the request. On the ...
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608 views

Can a preposition have the form of superlative?

They had almost reached the door when a voice spoke from the chair nearest them, "I can't believe you're going to do this.” I guess nearest is at the place of preposition. Can a preposition ...
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687 views

What does the title “Whose line is it anyway?” mean?

Whose line is it anyway? is a comedy show in which participants are given a theme and they are supposed to come up with an act according to the theme given to them. According to Oxford Dictionary, ...
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131 views

Is this adjective or adverbial?

When are you getting the train back to Adelaide? Is the phrase back to Adelaide an adjective phrase that modifies the train or adverbial to are getting?
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In the sentence “My house is down the street”, which word does the adverb “down” modify?

My house is down the street. Does the adverb down modify is, or street?
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2k views

“How best to handle” vs. “how to best handle”

Are there rules on the placement of 'best'? They are deciding how to best handle the matter. They are deciding how best to handle the matter. Is one of them wrong?
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299 views

Placement of 'Little'

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, 'little' as an adverb could mean: not much; only slightly Is there a preference among these sentences? He little helped his ...
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2answers
3k views

“Fairly quick” vs. “fairly quickly” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “drive safe” or “drive safely”? If I were to write a sentence like: I completed the task fairly quickly. Is it correct, or would fairly quick be ...
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653 views

Comparative adverbs

"Officially" (or so I believe) English doesn't have comparative adverbs (a single word rather than "more" + an adverb), but faster is in common usage as one, for example: Do it faster When ...
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Is it normal to use ‘the second’ without a preposition in expressing ‘as soon as” or ‘no later than’?

I saw the following sentence in Time magazine’s (December 3) article titled “Betraying physical book: A book lover’s e-dilemma: “When electronic books first came out, I embraced them ...
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310 views

Where to place the word “easily”? [closed]

Where should I place the word easily — before or after edit and share your bookmarks? Do you want to edit and share your bookmarks easily? or Do you want to easily edit and share your ...
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1answer
126 views

How to say “A has X, and B has X” in a single clause

How can we say Mike has an apple, and Jane has an apple in a single clause? Can I say Both Mike and Jane have an apple or Mike and Jane each have an apple? They sound fine to me but ...
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“Deliberately” vs. “intentionally” vs. “on purpose”

I wonder if there is any difference between usage of these three: deliberately intentionally on purpose Are they completely interchangeable? Are they at the same level of formality? I found some ...
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Does “more or less” mean “almost”? [closed]

I checked out its meaning on the web and the common one I have found is "speaking imprecisely", but instinctively I thought it would be like "almost", for example: The task assigned is more or ...
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657 views

What is the adverbial form of “communicational”?

I tried communicationally, but the Free Dictionary doesn’t find it to be a word. What I am trying to express is that someone is communicationally challenged, basically meaning they can’t communicate ...
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2answers
927 views

“I have been keeping ignoring you.”

Does this make any sense? I have been keeping ignoring you. Besides that it sounds awkward, my Chinese buddy who knows more grammar rules than I care to list said that the phrase is ...
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How should I reply to “Dude, are you there?”

Let's say I am having a telephone conference with rest of the team, and somebody asks me "Dude, are you there?" How should I reply? Yes, dude, I am there. or Yes, I am here? It is ...
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472 views

The use of “real” in the following cases [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Real quick question If you listen real close... Can you swing by real quick... Sentences like the above two are what I often hear in daily life. If I didn't ...
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861 views

What is the grammatical function of “never”?

What is the grammatical function of "never" in the following sentence? You will have to do something you've never done. Is it an adverb? My father disagrees with this. In "I have studied" vs. ...