An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
4
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3answers
225 views

“The same X” and intransitive verbs

As I have had explained to me at great length, wonder is intransitive. That's fine, but it can seem to take an object: Jim: Yesterday I wondered what that mark on the wall was made by Dave: I ...
4
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2answers
212 views

The adverb “away” for continuity or repetitiveness

I would like to ask about the adverbial particle "away" meaning continuity or repetitiveness (i.e. not a location, a distance, a change of position etc.). When used with some atelic verbs, the ...
2
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2answers
7k views

“Talk to you then then”

I am talking to a friend on the phone and the conversation is somewhat incomplete but we decide to hang up. Before hanging up, he says "I'll see you tomorrow". Would it be grammatical to reply, ...
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3answers
625 views

“Above” or “later” when referencing a range of versions of software

Which is correct when referencing an operating system version "OS X 10.6.x and later" or "OS X 10.6.x and above"? Bonus points for providing the why.
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0answers
30 views

Which one is correct, 'I like this more' or 'I like this better'? [duplicate]

I feel that using 'I like this name more' is more correct than 'I like this name better'. Since English is not my mother tongue, I am not sure.
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1answer
761 views

“more people becoming increasingly xxx” or “more people increasingly becoming xxx”

I need a bit of guidance regarding the following sentence. Which of the three variants is grammatical? Are more people becoming increasingly intolerant? Are more people increasingly becoming ...
0
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2answers
670 views

“Sometimes also” or “also sometimes”?

I have a sentence where I think I could use either of these two constructions. They seem very similar in meaning, so I'm not sure which I should prefer. There might be some subtle point of grammar ...
8
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6answers
772 views

What is “long” doing in “all (time-period) long”?

What part of speech is long playing the part of in the bold parts of the quotations below? For one thing, it shows at a glance how much money is on hand for any particular purpose all month long. ...
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5answers
4k views

Can an adverb be a noun at the same time?

In this sentence: Ben and Jen went home. Is home both an adverb and a noun?
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1answer
304 views

“Ever” vs “Always”

I have read that always is more used in American English, while ever is more used in British English. In this context, which of the following is correct: This always increasing interest brought. . ...
4
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1answer
7k views

“Lately” and “recently” in Present Perfect

If I use Present Perfect Progressive and Present Perfect with an expression of unfinished time, it implies that the action is continuing. But what about recently and lately — when used with ...
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5answers
7k views

What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”?

What part of speech does here have in the following sentence? I am here. I say that in that sentence, here must be an adverb because: It modifies the verb am by describing where I am. Am is a ...
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2answers
186 views

Using “meantime” as an adjective

Does it make sense to say: Please consider this email as a meantime brief report. If yes, why? and if no, how can it be fixed? Edit By the above sentence, I want to say that this email is not ...
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1answer
821 views

Is “in about” grammatical in “I'll reach there in about 5 minutes”?

Is it correct to say "I'll reach there in about 5 minutes?" Is "in about" correct in this sentence?
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0answers
335 views

Why does a negative adverbial phrase trigger inversion? [duplicate]

When a negative adverb (or adverbial phrase) is placed at the beginning of a sentence, we exchange the normal placement of subject and verb. Why is that?
2
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4answers
143 views

Proper English for “started shooting anywhere” [closed]

What's the proper word to describe someone shooting anywhere around in order to kill as many as possible: The terrorists entered the room and started shooting ________, 5 were killed, 1 injured.
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5answers
1k views

Indian English use of “only”

I am from Bangalore and people here tend use the word only to emphasise something in a sentence. For example: We are getting that only printed. What is the proper way to put it?
11
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4answers
6k views

Are the words “sillily”, “uglily”, “friendlily”, “livelily”, etc., valid English?

I have wondered about how to make the words silly, ugly, friendly, lively, etc. into adverbs, so I researched in the Internet. I found many different answers, so I tried checking Oxford Dictionaries. ...
2
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1answer
23k views

“Yet” at the beginning of a sentence

Can one use "Yet" at the beginning of a sentence as follows? Yet, he came late. Is this grammatical?
3
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1answer
279 views

Does it make sense to end this sentence with “manually”

This sentence: Verify that the table includes the configured values manually. Is it the same as saying: Manually verify that the table includes the configured values. or the same as: ...
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2answers
2k views

Is there any difference between “stoop down” and “stoop”?

According to Longman, they are the same, but I wonder if this is correct or if so, which one is more common. For example: Dave stooped down to tie his shoes. Dave stooped to tie his shoes. ...
0
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3answers
3k views

Use of “yet another” in the middle of a sentence

Is the usage of yet another correct in the following sentence? This sentence might need yet another piece of work for you! Where can I place yet another in a sentence?
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6answers
495 views

Confusing adverbs, “still” and “yet”

Which of these sentences is correct, and why? It's yet stopped raining. We will be able to leave soon. It's still stopped raining. We will be able to leave soon.
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1answer
3k views

What's the Best English word for 6 months in this group: daily, weekly, quarterly, 6 months, yearly? [duplicate]

While writing programs, I need to create a drop down for setting periods, like daily, weekly, monthly, etc. Using one year as a time frame. This question is driven by lack of a better word. I've had ...
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2answers
367 views

Adverb placement

Are the sentences below grammatically correct? I didn't support Gheddafi and I will never support him. I didn't support Gheddafi and will never support him. I didn't support Gheddafi and never ...
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3answers
82 views

“Move slower” vs. “move less”

What is the proper word to fill the blank? The more cars there are on a given road, the __ the traffic will move. The answer is slower. But I wonder whether less is incorrect.
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1answer
2k views

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around?

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around, completely changing their meaning? For example, simply childish becomes childishly simple. Or wonderfully sarcastic becomes ...
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1answer
146 views

What does “is there any book around …” mean?

Is there any book around which I can read? What does the above sentence mean? "Is there any book available in the market which I can read?" "Is there any book in this room/or nearby which I can ...
2
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1answer
219 views

When would I use “once” versus “nonce”?

Looking at the definitions for once and nonce. they appear very similar to me. Under what circumstances would one or the other be a more appropriate word choice?
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1answer
559 views

Is this usage of “however” with an adjective correct?

Is the word "however" correctly used in this sentence? If not, how could it be rephrased? This program, however comprehensive, hasn't been updated for a long time. Is there a better construct to ...
6
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3answers
66k views

Use of a semicolon before and comma after “however”

Several years ago, a previous boss told me to use a semicolon and comma with the word "however". I've always questioned this and would like to know if the following random sentences are using the ...
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1answer
298 views

Is “regardless” a word I shouldn't use? [closed]

Is it true that "regardless" is a word I shouldn't use because it is obsolete? If it is, what shall I use instead?
2
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3answers
655 views

Four-word phrase stress

I'm interested to learn why the following four-word phrases have stress on different words. "Little Red Riding Hood" (stress is on little and riding) "Infamous National Rifle Association" ...
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1answer
135 views

With + adverb structure

The strange example makes me confused - with + adverb : "Red items need dealing with immediately after the process..." How correct and common of this structure?
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1answer
354 views

Adverbs right after the subject [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should an adverb go before or after a verb? Is it correct to write a sentence this way? Now we can speak about the steps that I’ve previously listed. Or it would ...
0
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2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “so much” and “quite so much”?

I was told that "so much" is more emphatic than "quite so much", but I am not sure. Could you explain the difference between the following pairs of sentences? Don't put so much emphasis on that ...
2
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4answers
4k views

“First off” vs “first”

First off we need to write down a word; second we need... First we need to write down a word; second we need... What's the subtle difference between "first off" and "first"? Moreover, ...
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3answers
288 views

“I went to bed hungry” vs. “I went to bed hungrily” [closed]

What is the exact difference between "I went to bed hungry" and "I went to bed hungrily"?
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1answer
1k views

Word to describe things that run after each other [closed]

Is there a word to describe tasks that need to "run one after the other"? My current choice is sequentially, but feel there is a better word.
29
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4answers
162k views

Is it “peek”, “peak” or “pique”?

I have always thought the phrase was "pique my interest" as in: "Her mysterious background piqued my interest". However, of late, on blogs and social networks, I have seen people using "peek my ...
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3answers
357 views

Do adverbs only describe verbs?

Egypt and Tunisia have both taken steps to form a new government after the overthrow of Mubarak and Ben Ali respectively. In this context, does respectively describe the steps that have been ...
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1answer
2k views

Correct usage of “yet” in the middle of the sentence [closed]

Is the following sentence a correct usage of yet? I'm someone like you, and yet like no one. I think it matches the last definition of OAAD, more importantly. But I also think the comma and and ...
0
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2answers
342 views

Grammaticality of “I have a car, neither does Sara” [closed]

Can we say "I have a red car. Neither does Sara." or must we say "I have a red car but Sara doesn't."? I have read this on a website and they said that the first sentence is incorrect but I don't ...
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1answer
150 views

“In avoiding failure” vs. “For avoiding failure”?

1: In avoiding failure, we must be careful. 2: For avoiding failure, we must be careful. What are the subtle differences between the two sentences?
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0answers
29 views

Difference between the two sentences? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” I got confused between these two centences: I answered only four questions in my exam. I only answered four questions in my exam. ...
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3answers
736 views

“I was really thinking” vs. “I really was thinking”

Which one of the following is correct? I was really thinking to do that. I really was thinking to do that.
2
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1answer
2k views

Is there a name for misusing a word (e.g., saying “Provincially, yes”)? [closed]

I read a mail in which someone replied to the question "Will he be attending the party?" by saying "Provincially, yes". Provincial means "of or concerning the regions outside the capital city of a ...
0
votes
2answers
9k views

“I did it by myself” vs “I did it myself” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Myself vs by myself "I did it by myself" and "I did it myself"; what's the exact and subtle difference between the two?
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6answers
309 views

Looking for a formal equivalent phrase for the adverb “personally”

Which one is correct: "personal basis" or "individual basis"? I want to use it in a formal letter. I want to say: "I don't know Mr. X on a personal basis (or individual basis) and I have not had an ...