An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Why does a negative adverbial phrase trigger inversion? [duplicate]

When a negative adverb (or adverbial phrase) is placed at the beginning of a sentence, we exchange the normal placement of subject and verb. Why is that?
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4answers
141 views

Proper English for “started shooting anywhere” [closed]

What's the proper word to describe someone shooting anywhere around in order to kill as many as possible: The terrorists entered the room and started shooting ________, 5 were killed, 1 injured.
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5answers
998 views

Indian English use of “only”

I am from Bangalore and people here tend use the word only to emphasise something in a sentence. For example: We are getting that only printed. What is the proper way to put it?
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4answers
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Are the words “sillily”, “uglily”, “friendlily”, “livelily”, etc., valid English?

I have wondered about how to make the words silly, ugly, friendly, lively, etc. into adverbs, so I researched in the Internet. I found many different answers, so I tried checking Oxford Dictionaries. ...
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1answer
21k views

“Yet” at the beginning of a sentence

Can one use "Yet" at the beginning of a sentence as follows? Yet, he came late. Is this grammatical?
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1answer
270 views

Does it make sense to end this sentence with “manually”

This sentence: Verify that the table includes the configured values manually. Is it the same as saying: Manually verify that the table includes the configured values. or the same as: ...
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2answers
1k views

Is there any difference between “stoop down” and “stoop”?

According to Longman, they are the same, but I wonder if this is correct or if so, which one is more common. For example: Dave stooped down to tie his shoes. Dave stooped to tie his shoes. ...
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3answers
3k views

Use of “yet another” in the middle of a sentence

Is the usage of yet another correct in the following sentence? This sentence might need yet another piece of work for you! Where can I place yet another in a sentence?
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6answers
463 views

Confusing adverbs, “still” and “yet”

Which of these sentences is correct, and why? It's yet stopped raining. We will be able to leave soon. It's still stopped raining. We will be able to leave soon.
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1answer
2k views

What's the Best English word for 6 months in this group: daily, weekly, quarterly, 6 months, yearly? [duplicate]

While writing programs, I need to create a drop down for setting periods, like daily, weekly, monthly, etc. Using one year as a time frame. This question is driven by lack of a better word. I've had ...
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2answers
341 views

Adverb placement

Are the sentences below grammatically correct? I didn't support Gheddafi and I will never support him. I didn't support Gheddafi and will never support him. I didn't support Gheddafi and never ...
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3answers
81 views

“Move slower” vs. “move less”

What is the proper word to fill the blank? The more cars there are on a given road, the __ the traffic will move. The answer is slower. But I wonder whether less is incorrect.
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1answer
2k views

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around?

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around, completely changing their meaning? For example, simply childish becomes childishly simple. Or wonderfully sarcastic becomes ...
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1answer
146 views

What does “is there any book around …” mean?

Is there any book around which I can read? What does the above sentence mean? "Is there any book available in the market which I can read?" "Is there any book in this room/or nearby which I can ...
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1answer
215 views

When would I use “once” versus “nonce”?

Looking at the definitions for once and nonce. they appear very similar to me. Under what circumstances would one or the other be a more appropriate word choice?
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1answer
523 views

Is this usage of “however” with an adjective correct?

Is the word "however" correctly used in this sentence? If not, how could it be rephrased? This program, however comprehensive, hasn't been updated for a long time. Is there a better construct to ...
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3answers
59k views

Use of a semicolon before and comma after “however”

Several years ago, a previous boss told me to use a semicolon and comma with the word "however". I've always questioned this and would like to know if the following random sentences are using the ...
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1answer
284 views

Is “regardless” a word I shouldn't use? [closed]

Is it true that "regardless" is a word I shouldn't use because it is obsolete? If it is, what shall I use instead?
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3answers
646 views

Four-word phrase stress

I'm interested to learn why the following four-word phrases have stress on different words. "Little Red Riding Hood" (stress is on little and riding) "Infamous National Rifle Association" ...
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1answer
131 views

With + adverb structure

The strange example makes me confused - with + adverb : "Red items need dealing with immediately after the process..." How correct and common of this structure?
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1answer
343 views

Adverbs right after the subject [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should an adverb go before or after a verb? Is it correct to write a sentence this way? Now we can speak about the steps that I’ve previously listed. Or it would ...
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2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “so much” and “quite so much”?

I was told that "so much" is more emphatic than "quite so much", but I am not sure. Could you explain the difference between the following pairs of sentences? Don't put so much emphasis on that ...
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4answers
3k views

“First off” vs “first”

First off we need to write down a word; second we need... First we need to write down a word; second we need... What's the subtle difference between "first off" and "first"? Moreover, ...
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3answers
277 views

“I went to bed hungry” vs. “I went to bed hungrily” [closed]

What is the exact difference between "I went to bed hungry" and "I went to bed hungrily"?
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1answer
1k views

Word to describe things that run after each other [closed]

Is there a word to describe tasks that need to "run one after the other"? My current choice is sequentially, but feel there is a better word.
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4answers
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Is it “peek”, “peak” or “pique”?

I have always thought the phrase was "pique my interest" as in: "Her mysterious background piqued my interest". However, of late, on blogs and social networks, I have seen people using "peek my ...
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3answers
348 views

Do adverbs only describe verbs?

Egypt and Tunisia have both taken steps to form a new government after the overthrow of Mubarak and Ben Ali respectively. In this context, does respectively describe the steps that have been ...
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1answer
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Correct usage of “yet” in the middle of the sentence [closed]

Is the following sentence a correct usage of yet? I'm someone like you, and yet like no one. I think it matches the last definition of OAAD, more importantly. But I also think the comma and and ...
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2answers
339 views

Grammaticality of “I have a car, neither does Sara” [closed]

Can we say "I have a red car. Neither does Sara." or must we say "I have a red car but Sara doesn't."? I have read this on a website and they said that the first sentence is incorrect but I don't ...
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1answer
146 views

“In avoiding failure” vs. “For avoiding failure”?

1: In avoiding failure, we must be careful. 2: For avoiding failure, we must be careful. What are the subtle differences between the two sentences?
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0answers
29 views

Difference between the two sentences? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” I got confused between these two centences: I answered only four questions in my exam. I only answered four questions in my exam. ...
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3answers
692 views

“I was really thinking” vs. “I really was thinking”

Which one of the following is correct? I was really thinking to do that. I really was thinking to do that.
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1answer
2k views

Is there a name for misusing a word (e.g., saying “Provincially, yes”)? [closed]

I read a mail in which someone replied to the question "Will he be attending the party?" by saying "Provincially, yes". Provincial means "of or concerning the regions outside the capital city of a ...
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2answers
9k views

“I did it by myself” vs “I did it myself” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Myself vs by myself "I did it by myself" and "I did it myself"; what's the exact and subtle difference between the two?
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6answers
307 views

Looking for a formal equivalent phrase for the adverb “personally”

Which one is correct: "personal basis" or "individual basis"? I want to use it in a formal letter. I want to say: "I don't know Mr. X on a personal basis (or individual basis) and I have not had an ...
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1answer
536 views

Why does the word “inadvertently” mean “not knowingly”?

The root is advertently. That means “knowingly”. Fair enough. The root of advertently is advertent. That means “attention”. Hmmm … quite close. The root of advertent is advert, which means ...
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1answer
789 views

“Enables you to quickly and easily identify” vs. “enables you to identify quickly and easily” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? I'm currently having a bit of a dispute and would appreciate your help please. Which one is ...
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5answers
453 views

“Will shortly appear automatically” — what is the correct order of words in this fragment?

I want to say that an answer will appear shortly, and automatically, on the screen. I'm not sure whether the correct sentence is: The answer will shortly appear automatically. or maybe: The ...
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2answers
114 views

“The Cry of Jousts of King Richard II” — a problem with translation

I'm trying to translate this text to Polish and everything seems pretty clear to me, apart from the usage of the words "within" and "without". I presume it's some kind of technical vocabulary ...
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1answer
469 views

Most is adjective or adverb, comparative or superlative in the following phrase?

In the following phrase, from the 1971 film "The Devils" by Ken Russell, what is "most"? An adjective or an adverb? And in what form, comparative or superlative? I conjure thee, most frightful ...
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2answers
692 views

Is it possible to say ' your choice *for* something' when you mean 'your choice *of* something'?

I'm correcting a document and several people that co-wrote it seem to agree that 'my choice for' seems to be synonymous to 'my choice of', in the signification of me having chosen something and ...
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1answer
185 views

Exact meaning of “You are brand new”? [closed]

I run across a phrase of "You are brand new to GitHub" on the web. What makes me confused is the word "brand"; is it a noun, an adjective or an adverb?
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2answers
166 views

“I need to wash my hands bad[ly]” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you” I'm terrible at the usage of bad vs. badly. Given the sentence: I need to wash my hands bad[ly]. Should the ...
17
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3answers
835 views

You don't want to answer this word-placement question, now do you?

Prompted by this question I got to thinking about the placement of the word now. If it's placed before the comma, it refers to an immediate condition: You don't want to answer this word-placement ...
3
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1answer
277 views

Positioning “only” in “I have worked with X” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Which of the following sentences are correct? I have worked with only Mr. X. I have worked only with Mr. X. I have only worked with ...
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2answers
3k views

Place of an adverb in the passive present perfect progressive

I was wondering where an adverb should (or could) be placed in the passive present perfect progressive in English. I have been being carefully tickled. OR I have been carefully being ...
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5answers
73k views

Is it correct to say “I kindly request you to…”?

Isn't kindness already implied when you say "I request you to..."? When I say "I humbly request you to...", the word humbly helps me to label the state of my behavior during the request. On the ...
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4answers
637 views

Can a preposition have the form of superlative?

They had almost reached the door when a voice spoke from the chair nearest them, "I can't believe you're going to do this.” I guess nearest is at the place of preposition. Can a preposition ...
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724 views

What does the title “Whose line is it anyway?” mean?

Whose line is it anyway? is a comedy show in which participants are given a theme and they are supposed to come up with an act according to the theme given to them. According to Oxford Dictionary, ...
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139 views

Is this adjective or adverbial?

When are you getting the train back to Adelaide? Is the phrase back to Adelaide an adjective phrase that modifies the train or adverbial to are getting?