An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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350 views

What is the difference between these “distancing expressions”?

There are a number of words that mean "generally believed to be true but not necessarily true" but their connotations differ tremendously. Some examples of these are allegedly putatively ...
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1answer
108 views

To Witness Something of Such Beauty

There is a word used in English but from Italian (I think) which has the following meaning: To witness something or someone of such profound beauty that you are compelled to sing aloud in ...
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2answers
125 views

Replacement for “narrowly missed?”

I am trying to remove adverbs from my writing. My grant proposal narrowly missed the funding threshold. I want to replace the phrase "narrowly missed" or change the whole sentence but still ...
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3answers
5k views

“Now I am” vs. “I am now”

Which is more correct? Now I am the main stakeholder... or I am now the main stakeholder... Do the intonations imply different meanings?
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1answer
63 views

Capital letter after adverb [closed]

In sentences like: Also, it provides ... Also, It provides ... is it allowed to place It (with a capital I) instead of it after the adverb Also?
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3answers
274 views

“When we X, we can then” vs. “we then can”

Consider these two sentences: When we go home, we can then watch a DVD When we go home, then we can watch a DVD Both mean the exact same thing, but do they differ in linguistic terms?
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1answer
850 views

What is the correct usage of the word “Contra”?

According to multiple sources (1 and 2), the word "contra" can be employed as either a preposition or an adverb. From my perspective, however, there is a dearth of clear examples featuring this word ...
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5answers
10k views

What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”?

What part of speech does here have in the following sentence? I am here. I say that in that sentence, here must be an adverb because: It modifies the verb am by describing where I am. Am is a ...
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2answers
44 views

How to choose between “spatial” or “spatially”?

I'm writing my thesis and I need help with the title, here it is: Improved seam merging for temporally and spatially video resizing with structure and motion preservation I am not sure about the ...
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2answers
243 views

Meaning of “sensorily”

As a non-native English speaker, I am having a hard time understanding what the author means by sensorily austere here. The quote is taken from Man in the landscape, by Paul Shepard. The desert is ...
21
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3answers
28k views

Is it 'what it looks like' or 'how it looks like'?

I live in a country where English is not the native language. Oftentimes I hear my coworkers say they want to know or determine "how it looks like". This is grammatically closer to our native ...
0
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1answer
95 views

Is usually tired, usually tired, and feels tired?

She is usually tired after coming back from school. She usually tired after coming back from school. She usually feels tired after coming back from school. Which one is correct? ...
6
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7answers
13k views

“I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you”

What is the correct usage? Apparently it is "I feel badly", but but wouldn't that mean you have an inadequate ability to feel?
2
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1answer
160 views

“Feeling well” adverb ambiguity

Am I just crazy, or is there some ambiguity in the phrase "feeling well"? Example: Billy has a genetic defect that causes him to lose sensation in his fingertips every few days, or so. "How are you ...
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1answer
107 views

Usage of the word “Doggedly”

At the end of chapter 16 of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, the author states: After that day, a day rarely passed without her drawing the hammer on her slate, and without Orlick's ...
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2answers
85 views

Can I wish someone on new home as “ my cordial wishes to your family on new home” [closed]

I would like to wish my boss on her new home. Is the below statement correct? My cordial wishes to your family on new home
2
votes
1answer
92 views

Use of “respectively” in “both these localities are on the banks, respectively, at 12 km and 20 km upstream”

Both these source localities are on the banks of the Rhine, respectively, at 12 km and 20 km upstream from Bonn. In the above sentence, is respectively needed, and if so, is it properly used?
4
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4answers
38k views

“Henceforth” vs. “hereinafter”

What is the most suitable way to express that a sentence/word will be "replaced by" another sentence/word, from that point (in a text, for instance)? Henceforth called/named... Hereinafter ...
11
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4answers
849 views

Can a preposition have the form of superlative?

They had almost reached the door when a voice spoke from the chair nearest them, "I can't believe you're going to do this.” I guess nearest is at the place of preposition. Can a preposition ...
0
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1answer
220 views

Is it correct to say “more sufficient”?

I suggest that the maintenance period be from 12:30 to 2:30 so that we can have more sufficient time to handle if any unexpected problems occur. Is it correct to say more sufficient?
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3answers
154 views

“Shamefully presents” vs. “ashamedly presents”

I'm editing a short movie. In the title screens, after the production company is listed, there needs to be a play on the common "Proudly Presents" text. It is with some chagrin that the production ...
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1answer
159 views

“in danger”: an adverb or an adjective?

Is the expression "in danger" an adverb or an adjective? Why?
2
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1answer
67 views

In theory or theoretically: use of adverbs

Which form is more correct or more readable for writing a scientific article: In theory D is constant when q tends to infinity. or Theoretically D is constant when q tends to infinity. Thanks
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3answers
3k views

Adverbs + Present Perfect

Here's my problem: I've been confused about the placement of adverbs in present/past perfect phrases. For example, which sentence would sound better: "We had been slowly drifting down the river ...
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2answers
52 views

Commas with conjunctive adverbs [closed]

Which is correct? Certainly that was a good thing. or, Certainly, that was a good thing.
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2answers
1k views

Why has the word “thrice” fallen out of common usage?

I'm an American living in America, but my workplace has a lot of immigrants from India here. They all use "thrice" very commonly, which is wonderful to my ears! Thrice is such a delightful word. ...
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2answers
92 views

I know this sentence is wrong but

I'm trying to explain to the person who wrote it, and to myself, why it is wrong. Dan plays the drums as vindictively as though they’d personally insulted him. The "as adverbially as though" is ...
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2answers
2k views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
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3answers
1k views

Does the word “apparently” imply that I personally do or don't believe the statement following it?

When I say "Apparently, xyz", does that imply one of the following, and if so, which one? From observation, I believe xyz to be true, but I leave open the possibility that I might be wrong. I ...
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2answers
57 views

the X event after next…Th

Is it grammatically correct to say "at the steering committee meeting after next"? The idea is that there are meetings every two weeks, but the intention is for something to be presented not at the ...
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1answer
57 views

Which verb has been modified?

Which verb has been modified by adverb "directly" in the following sentence? "Some governments even offer to help protect their critical infrastructure directly, by deploying sensors in the networks ...
0
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1answer
86 views

What does “not perhaps” mean?

What exactly does "not perhaps" mean? I encountered it in Smith's The Wealth of Nations In Chapter I. Of The Division Of Labour: The effects of the division of labour, in the general business of ...
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3answers
2k views

Clarifying the usage of “hella”

The word hella has spread from the Southern California dialect to the point where most varieties of American English speaker (such as me in the Midwest) know that it exists and hear it used. I always ...
0
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3answers
166 views

Mandatory use of adverbs?

Today I was debating whether the use of the adverbs such as 'well', 'badly', 'poorly' must be used after verbs like 'behave' and 'conduct'. Many times I am faced with sentences such as: A court ...
17
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4answers
33k views

Using “seldomly”

I'm not a native English speaker. If at all possible I try to use spell checkers while writing anything on the web hence using one in Firefox as well. Whenever I try to write "seldomly" it highlights ...
3
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1answer
242 views

What is the word “funny” modifying in this sentence?

I don’t understand why Daniella is acting so funny. Is funny modifiying Daniella (which would make it an adjective) or is it modifying acting (making it an adverb)? Is there any way to tell ...
2
votes
1answer
209 views

Can I delete the relative adverb “where” anytime?

Can I say, "You can stand in the house Romeo and Juliet fell in love." In this case, relative adverb 'where' was deleted. But I think there should be "in" at the end of the sentence. Am I right? Can ...
14
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3answers
19k views

“Can easily be” vs. “can be easily” — what's the difference?

I'm wondering what the difference is between: It can easily be obtained. It can be easily obtained. Also, what's the preferred way to write it? If there is any... I googled for both ...
9
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3answers
42k views

When to use commas in a sentence that starts with “finally”, “additionally”, etc.?

If I have a sentence that starts with additionally, finally, consequently, etc. do I always have to put a comma after it? Or is there a different rule?
29
votes
2answers
14k views

What is the difference between “maybe” and “may be”?

What is the difference in meaning and usage between maybe and may be? Are they synonymous?
1
vote
1answer
3k views

“overly confident” vs “over confident”

I hear or read both phrases regularly, and they seem to have the same meaning to me. But do they have different meanings? Or is “overly confident” even grammatically correct?
3
votes
3answers
250 views

Proper placement of “exactly”?

I want to ask a question whose meaning is "what is the exact way in which X works?". Where is the most appropriate place for the adverb "exactly"? How exactly does X work? How does exactly X work? ...
3
votes
1answer
19k views

“Consequently” versus “consequentially”

What is the difference between consequently and consequentially? My usage being what it is, and also according to the dictionary sample sentences I've found so far (thank you for the helpful comment ...
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5answers
1k views

Why is the word “how” considered an adverb, even if the answer is an adjective?

Consider this question and its related answer: Question: How was the pizza? Answer: It was delicious. The question is asking how, which is defined in every dictionary as an ...
0
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1answer
144 views

Is it common to use “totally” in such a way as “Michelle Obama’ s totally running in California.” [duplicate]

Vanity Fair magazine (October 23 issue) carried an article titled, “A brief history of Michelle Obama career-goal rumors,” and wrote as follows under the caption, “She’s totally running in ...
0
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1answer
343 views

Can you end a sentence with 'hence'?

Pretentiousness/archaism aside, does the sentence Any changes that were made have been detailed hence. make sense? The context would be that the descriptions of changes would be found in the ...
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4answers
54 views

Discerning between as and so?

I would appreciate it, if someone readily explain the difference between these. As, I yet to get what the first one means precisely, I had to broach such a discussion. UPDATED: The world was created ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Do certain contrasting conjunctions + certain contrasting adverbs = redundancy?

For example, would the following sentence with either ‘rather’ or ‘instead’ included in the middle (or, for that matter, with ‘instead’ alone at the end) be redundant. If a redundancy, would it rise ...
2
votes
1answer
730 views

Is “anecdotally” a proper adverb?

And if yes, is it common or rather odd? Example sentence: Anecdotally, we do see instances of customers buying both our products at the same store. The Chrome spellchecker doesn't seem to ...
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1answer
118 views

Adverb of frequency + connection adverb

When I normally use "perhaps" (or "maybe") and want to emphasize it, I put it the beginning of the sentence. Perhaps a better approach is to save the status of the button and restore it. Now, I ...