An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Is using “maybe” in combination with a conjugation of “to be” bad style?

I've read this answer about the difference between “maybe” and “may be”. It contains the sentence “maybe he is in the office today” as a correct example. In the above example “maybe” and “is” is ...
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Is there any archaic word for “finally”?

So I was wondering whether there is any archaic word that means "finally" or "at last"?
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Is it correct to say “I kindly request you to…”?

Isn't kindness already implied when you say "I request you to..."? When I say "I humbly request you to...", the word humbly helps me to label the state of my behavior during the request. On the ...
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Speak Slower or Speak Slowlier?

AFAIK the correct grammar for "speak slow" is "speak slowly" (slowly being an adverb). Please correct me if I am mistaken. But in daily life I have not heard anyone saying "Speak slowlier". I think ...
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765 views

“Beautiful” or “beautifully” [closed]

Should I say You look beautifully today or You look beautiful today? In my opinion, the first form is correct because beautifully describes the verb and not the noun. Thus, I should use the beautiful ...
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An adverb challenge

I was set the challenge to provide one particular adverb that can be used as verb modifier, adjective modifier and adverb modifier, and an example of its use in each of the cases. In addition the ...
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5k views

“Adverbial phrase” vs “Adverbial clause”

Please tell me what the difference is between an adverbial phrase and an adverbial clause.
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55 views

Question on “Out of”

In "out of", is the "out" considered a preposition or an adverb?
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Translating Gerunds from Spanish to English (verb+ing)

In Spanish, the gerund form (-ando, -endo) is frequently used adverbially to modify and describe the verb: El alma es dichosa dando y sirviendo. El niño anda bailando. El artista vive provocando ...
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When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
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2answers
484 views

Should I use a hyphen after -ly when modifying a verb in the past participle verb?

Which of these are acceptable? Is one preferable over the other? "Chemically-deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." "Chemically deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." Also, is the title to ...
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Use of an ~ing form with another verb

I'm not sure how to describe the use of the bolded words in the following cases: Pete is happy singing a song Anna talked screaming Mike entered the room screaming and laughing Is it ...
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5k views

What is the correct usage of “meanwhile”?

I see meanwhile a lot; I use it a lot; yet I'm not sure about the formal rules when it's applicable. Can anyone help me?
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Is “like” used as an adjective by native speakers?

Do native speakers use like as an adjective? Is it a preferred usage?
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Which is correct: “drive safe” or “drive safely”?

Which one is correct? Similarly, is "do good" correct?
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4k views

“Increasingly XXX” or “increasingly more XXX”

Which is correct: increasingly XXX or increasingly more XXX, where XXX is an adjective? A colleague and I are disagreeing. I think the use of more is redundant.
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Avoiding Adverbs

I have been told to avoid adverbs at all costs. What is another way of rewriting: This feature is not easily extensible.
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What is the difference between the adjectives/adverbs “broad” and “wide”? the nouns “breadth” and “width”? [duplicate]

Broad and wide are near synonyms but only near, since "a broad smile" is a more common collocation than "a wide smile", and you can say "eyes wide open" but not "eyes broad open". Breadth and width ...
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36 views

“Almost” vs “near to”

Consider the phrase below: He produced almost no news reports this week. And this another one: He produced near to no news reports this week. Do "almost" and "near to" have the same ...
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Placing “first” in a sentence; would it change the meaning?

How does the meaning of the following two sentences differ? I first wanted to tell you about it. I wanted to tell you about it first.
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We say entrepreneur and entrepreneurship, what is the verb?

For the word entrepreneur and entrepreneurship, I would like to know the corresponding verb, i.e the action of doing entrepreneurship, i.e the verb that should fit in the next sentence : To be a good ...
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When should you use “then” and when “than”?

As far as I know, then is used in a conjunction and in time-related sentences; than in all other cases. I believe that these are correct: Because I'm older than she, I should be the first chosen; I ...
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1answer
174 views

Is “ignorably” a word?

I would like to use ignorably as the adverb of ignorable but I am not sure whether this is correct. I did not find ignorably in any online dictionary. To give the context: Normally, you cannot ignore ...
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449 views

Shall I use 'thus' or 'thusly'? [duplicate]

Which is correct? ...others are compensated thus. ...others are compensated thusly. This page says 'thusly' is incorrect: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/thusly However without the 'ly' is ...
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When should “farther” and “further” be used?

I know I learned the difference between the usage of farther and further in school, but I can never remember where each one should be used. Can someone help me out here?
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What does 'infinitesimally small' mean?

If infinite is the opposite of infinitesimal, and small is the opposite of large, then: infinitely large ---------- Means "very large" infinitely small --------- Means "very small" infinitesimally ...
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Can an adverb be a noun at the same time?

In this sentence: Ben and Jen went home. Is home both an adverb and a noun?
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Can adverbs also modify/specify the speaker's state of mind, emotion, character, etc. in English?

I don't think there are such adverbs in English that officially indicate the speaker's emotional/mental state, personality, etc. "Could you please let me join your group?" doesn't convey the ...
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314 views

Is “alone” an adverb in “I was sitting alone”?

Is the sentence "I was sitting alone." correct? And if so, is "alone" an adverb? Are there other examples of adjectives being used as adverbs without modification?
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What is the difference when we change the position of adverbs?

Would you possibly readily elaborate the reason why you do not say A book is there on the table. instead of There is a book on the table. ?
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How alive is the distinction between 'not any more' and 'not any longer'?

Does I don't love you any more. mean that my love dwindled till there was not any more of it left, focus(s)ing on the process, whereas I don't love you any longer. would mean that there ...
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823 views

Can you say “more quickly”? [duplicate]

Can you say "more quickly" in the context "I can move more quickly than she can."
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Are 'effectually' and 'effectively' completely interchangable?

In the OED: effectively, (adverb)—in such a manner as to achieve a desired result: make sure that resources are used effectively. effectual, (adjective)—successful in producing ...
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193 views

Verbs that change meaning depending on object position

I was writing a text and I stumbled upon the differences between: Lily slipped and threw up her keys Lily slipped and threw her keys up [in the air] For a moment I was finding phrase 1 more ...
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Quick or Quickly: “How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy” [duplicate]

Let’s say I have this title: How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy Should I say quick and easy or quickly and easily? Why?
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“Newly found” vs. “New Found”

What is the grammatically correct way to say the following sentence? "I have come away with a new found respect for the author..." or "I have come away with a newly found respect for the ...
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The Royal Order of Adverbs

I know that the pattern manner-place-time shouldn't be taken too seriously if one wants to speak natural English. In real life, people rarely use a string of adverbs. Speakers will easily break the ...
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1answer
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'in appreciation' vs. 'appreciatively' [closed]

Is using the adverbial prepositional phrase in appreciation in place of the adverb appreciatively convey exactly the same meaning? I'm attempting to avoid the use of the adverb "appreciatively" in ...
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How to use the words ending with “-ly”?

First question: in the grammar world, where do the -ly ended words belong? Second question: how to use them correctly? Rarely (oops!), if ever, I get myself using -ly ended words in my writing. I'm ...
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1answer
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What does “barely” imply?

When someone says, I barely understand that. Does he mean: He almost doesn't understand [which means he understands a bit] He almost understands [which means he doesn't understand] ...
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1answer
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“Firstly, secondly” vs. “Firstly, lastly” when listing just two points

Normally, if we which to illustrate our points, we can use firstly, secondly, lastly (or last but not least or finally). There are a few pieces of information we need to notice: Firstly, ...
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Is “more poorly” an appropriate phrase?

Today I described someone as being trained to react "more poorly" to a given situation. Her current reaction is poor. It is becoming more poor. So she reacts more poorly. Is this correct? It sounds ...
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Is it more correct to say “You have not yet <actioned>” or “You have not <actioned> yet”?

Having seen Correct placing and usage of "yet", it sounds like it may be correct to say either "You have not created any items yet." or "You have not yet created any items." Is one more ...
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Is 'but rather' considered grammatically correct?

Is this comment that I made here grammatically correct? In Latin, when a group of males and females is combined, the neutral plural form is not used, but rather the masculine is.
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I have been sick for the last week? [closed]

I' would like to know whether or not the following sentences are correct and why: I have been sick since last week. I have been sick since the last week. I have been sick for the last ...
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Part of speech and usage of “in person”

Is "in person" an adjective or adverb, describing the person or the action being done? The artist will be in person, painting. The artist will be painting in person. Which is correct?
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What does “enough” mean in expressions like “Fair enough” or “Funny enough”?

As a non-native speaker, I already get used to the word enough in expressions like those below, but I sometimes still got confused of it. It makes me wonder what it actually means and where does it ...
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0answers
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Are hyphens needed in a noun-phrase that precedes 'manner'? [duplicate]

I sometimes use "manner" to use noun-phrases as adverbs, like "in the manner of a vigilant watchdog". If I reverse the order, does the noun phrase then have to be hypenated? Like so: "in a ...
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1answer
754 views

When to use wrong or wrongly as adverbs? [duplicate]

It seems that wrong is not only an adjective, but is also a proper adverb ("You're doing it wrong!", right?). There's, however, an adverb wrongly, which probably means the same thing. Talking about ...
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Which is correct here: “arbitrary” or “arbitrarily”?

Do you say "an arbitrarily small constant epsilon" or "an arbitrary small constant epsilon"? Or are both correct?