An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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4k views

Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?

Since 'great' is an adjective, "I'm doing great" seems to be incorrect. It should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." You could say "I'm doing well." Could you also say "I'm doing greatly."?
5
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3answers
165 views

Is there a rule about using the adverb “utterly” followed by negative adjectives?

I have noticed that most of the time it is the case in usage, but I'm not sure if it is a rule or not. I. e. would it be right to say "utterly wonderful" or does it sound oxymoronic? Thanks
2
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1answer
486 views

Inversion with “many times” at the beginning of a sentence

I am having a discussion with my friend. I said, "Many times I have seen him washing his car." He says it should be, "Many times have I seen him washing his car. Much like "Often do I see him", and ...
0
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2answers
278 views

Positioning of adverb phrases [duplicate]

Here are three ways to say the same thing. I wonder if there are particular rules regarding to the position of adverb phrases: Then play those passages over and over again in your memory Or, ...
3
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1answer
1k views

Any difference between “Are you done?” and “Are you done yet?”

I see people in movies saying Are you done? and Are you done yet? And I wonder what that the addition of yet might mean or suggest in the second version which is absent in the first ...
-1
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1answer
253 views

What's the correct adverb for predict? [closed]

I'm trying to figure out whether it is valid to say the size of ... is predictively determined some sources on the web include predictively as a valid adverb, some don't. And what about ...
4
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1answer
158 views

Always vs Every day

I have lunch at school every day vs I always have lunch at school. Why does the frequency adverb, always, go before the verb, have, whereas the expression, "every day" is placed at the end of ...
0
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3answers
121 views

Do I use adjective forms of concurrent and consecutive?

Should this passage use the adjectival or adverbial forms of concurrent and consecutive? The trial court also sentenced the defendant to five life sentences (with parole) and five 15-year ...
10
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4answers
8k views

“Nowadays” vs “today”

I'm taking an English academic writing course. My teacher recommended using today as it is more accepted compared to nowadays. I asked her if this is accepted in American English (she's from US) or in ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Which one is correct “et al.’s” or “et al.”?

I want to use the possessive noun form with et al. as in et al.'s versus et al.
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1answer
145 views

Is this an appropriate usage of “but” at the beginning of a sentence? [duplicate]

I try my best to use proper sentence construction and punctuation, and for my amusement, I've taken the quest to find meaningful situations where one might use the various conjunctions at the ...
1
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2answers
123 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
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1answer
123 views

Grammatical role of “kind of” [closed]

I would like to know what the grammatical construct "kind of + v" is? I kind of like cold weather or I kind of eat everything".
2
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1answer
378 views

Is there any difference between nevertheless and never the less?

I saw this on eBay's website: You can sell multiple items that, even though they are against eBay policy, don’t get you caught. Never the less, they are against the rules and can result in ...
8
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2answers
4k views

“In toto” versus “in total”

Are the phrases "in total" and "in toto" interchangeable, or is "in total" a corruption of "in toto"?
8
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2answers
353 views

Why “buy things secondhand,“ not “buy secondhand things”?

I saw the word ‘secondhand’ come after ‘things’ in the lead copy of July 17 Time magazine’s article, titled “10 Things You Should Be Buying Used”, as follows. Buying things secondhand can save a ...
1
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7answers
502 views

“Almost until 1900” or “until almost 1900”: which one is correct?

Although various eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American poets had professed an interest in Native American poetry and had pretended to imitate Native American forms in their own works, it was ...
3
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2answers
471 views

Position of “now”

What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences? This feature is now disabled. This feature is disabled now.
1
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1answer
166 views

Position of adverbial phrase [duplicate]

Is there a difference in these two sentences, and if so, what is the difference? Immediately afterwards I remembered having met her. I remembered having met her immediately afterwards. I think ...
5
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2answers
103k views

What does “duly” mean in the phrase “duly noted”?

The phrase "duly noted" is very common, but I have never used the word "duly" outside of this context. What is the meaning of the word "duly", and what does it add to the word "noted"? I would ...
1
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2answers
619 views

'Statistically significant associated to' — [Adv + Adj] as Adv?

Is 'XXX is statistically significant associated to YYY.' grammatically correct ? One of my friends says this is seen in many papers with statistics. Shouldn't it be '... statistically significantly ...
1
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1answer
177 views

How to best explain the use of best?

I've been asked to explain the use of best in the phrase "humans have found how best to live together" other than saying its an adverb I'm stumped, could someone wiser help me out.
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2answers
230 views

Can we say “naively honestly”? [duplicate]

Is this expression acceptable? I told her the whole story naively honestly. Thank you.
6
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2answers
217 views

“Each” — pronoun or adverb

I am looking at these two sentences: M and W are letters that each have 4 strokes. M and W are letters and each has 4 strokes. It seems that each is an adverb in (1) but a pronoun in ...
9
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4answers
3k views

Are the words “sillily”, “uglily”, “friendlily”, “livelily”, etc., valid English?

I have wondered about how to make the words silly, ugly, friendly, lively, etc. into adverbs, so I researched in the Internet. I found many different answers, so I tried checking Oxford Dictionaries. ...
2
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1answer
69 views

“Thence” to allude to the past

I see that "hence" means roughly "from this fact/time/place/source", while "thence" means roughly "from that fact/time/place/source". Usage such as "half an hour hence" is typically (although perhaps ...
3
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2answers
10k views

Is there a difference between “quicker” and “more quickly”

This is a follow up to this question: What is the difference between "quicker" and "faster"? "Quicker" is an adverb, as are "more" (in this context) and "quickly". So is there a ...
1
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1answer
59 views

scattered from, against, or by? [closed]

A quick Google search gives me the following sentences: An electron is scattered from a nucleus. An electron is scattered against a nucleus. An electron is scattered by a nucleus. Which one is ...
4
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0answers
117 views

He began to breathe deep / deeply [duplicate]

This is from Light in August, by W. Faulkner, Chapter 18: He began to breathe deep. He could feel himself breathing deep, (...) This confused me deep. (This is related but not an answer to my ...
6
votes
2answers
319 views

A word for something that's done only half-consciously

In writing fiction, I find myself using the word "absentmindedly" a lot, but I don't think it's really the word I'm looking for. I'm not looking so much something done in a distracted manner, but ...
3
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1answer
729 views

Term for verb+adverb with distinct meaning

There are verbs that, when paired with certain adverbs, can have a distinctly different meaning. For example, I looked up the word in the dictionary. The phrase looked up functions as a verb ...
0
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0answers
14 views

John hasn't directly worked with him [duplicate]

"John hasn't directly worked with him" or "John hasn't worked with him directly"? What's the correct form?
1
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1answer
455 views

If you place an ly adverb after the verb is the meaning different than if it were infront of the verb? [duplicate]

For example: I did not respond physically I did not physically respond I can't escape the sense that #2 'strongly' leaves open the possibility (or implies) that the writer responded some way ...
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2answers
257 views

What's the difference between “She came home angry” and “She came home angrily” [closed]

Are these two sentences grammatically correct? What's the difference between them? She came home angry She came home angrily
0
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2answers
351 views

“Sometimes also” or “also sometimes”?

I have a sentence where I think I could use either of these two constructions. They seem very similar in meaning, so I'm not sure which I should prefer. There might be some subtle point of grammar ...
1
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1answer
85 views

“The paper on Monday published X” vs. “the paper published on Monday X”

What would be the best position of Monday in the following sentence — before or after the verb? The paper on Monday published what the artist called a blunt attack on people’s right to privacy. ...
1
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1answer
134 views

“Would of course be” vs. “of course would be” [duplicate]

I am not sure about the position of 'of course' inside a sentence. Please consider these two versions and comment on that: A comprehensive documentation would of course be highly valuable... ...
8
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4answers
247 views

“Deliberate recluse” or “deliberately reclusive”

I was touching up my profile when I came upon this: Aspiring autodidact, deliberate recluse. Is the phrase deliberate recluse syntactically correct, or should I use deliberately reclusive ...
2
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4answers
719 views

Is this usage of “inside” correct?

This text is taken from a children's reader. It's about some children who find a doll house that is an exact reproduction of their home. Biff opened the little house. Everyone looked inside. "It ...
6
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3answers
318 views

Term meaning 'with written words'

In the same way that verbally means with spoken words, I'm looking for a term that means with written words. Is there such a word?
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2answers
108 views

“I only have discovered today” vs. “I only today have discovered” vs. “I have only today discovered”

Since I am not a native English speaker it's hard to find anything related to this topic on google. Which of the following word orders is grammatical? I only have discovered today we have a ...
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3answers
206 views

“Previously” vs. “last time”

What is the difference between the following two sentences? This is the vendor from which the item was purchased the last time. This is the vendor from which the item was purchased ...
2
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1answer
110 views

“Feeling well” adverb ambiguity

Am I just crazy, or is there some ambiguity in the phrase "feeling well"? Example: Billy has a genetic defect that causes him to lose sensation in his fingertips every few days, or so. "How are you ...
2
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0answers
2k views

For ever and forever [closed]

What is the difference between the meaning and usage of for ever and forever in British English? From what I could gather from my online research, forever means : (also for ever) for all ...
5
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3answers
3k views

“Always” vs. “forever”

What is the difference between always and forever? Are they synonyms used in different contexts or can they be used interchangeably?
5
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2answers
889 views

Which one is grammatically correct? Why?

I've a quick question about grammar within a sentence. I'd also like to know why it is like that if someone could provide an answer. Which one is correct? Along with fishing, I enjoy ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

What are the limitations on the “there + preposition” construction?

I use words such as thereof, thereupon, and thereafter relatively often, but I occasionally find myself wanting to use this construction with different prepositions. Most times it's therefor, which I ...
5
votes
7answers
8k views

What is the difference between “probably” and “possibly”? [closed]

Recently I saw the movie "Pursuit of Happyness", which is actually quite good, and I noticed the actor (Will Smith) asking the difference between probably and possibly to his son. So I would like to ...
3
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3answers
518 views

Elision in the pronunciation of “probably”

A student of mine has pointed out that in casual speech, my tendency is to pronounce the word "probably" as something like prah-lee. I am a native speaker of American English without a specific ...
1
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1answer
564 views

Pronunciation of “again”

What is the Standard British English1 pronunciation of "again"? I looked in Wiktionary and it gives two UK pronunciations, /əˈɡeɪn/, and /əˈɡɛn/. 1 I mean Standard British English as in the tag ...