An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Adverbs for Dirty (Dirtily?)

It is common to simply use 'dirty' as the adverb here, ex: He talks dirty. Other resources say that the adverb is dirtily! I do not believe I've ever heard this used... is it correct?
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6answers
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What are the arguments behind the “literally”/“figuratively” usage divide? When should one use either word?

I remember reading, some time in grade school, that there was a controversy about proper usage of figuratively and literally when used to denote meaning of a word in its strictest sense — but ...
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2answers
290 views

Why is “hopefully” treated so mercilessly?

Is the word "hopefully" unjustly treated? We don't like the sentence: "Hopefully, my ship is just over the horizon and due in real soon now." But we don't mind saying: "Happily, the tree fell on ...
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1answer
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What's the correct usage of “hopefully”?

I said, "Hopefully, I will get better" to a friend and he said that I was using it incorrectly, stating that hopefully is an adverb meaning "full of hope" that modifies a verb. It sounds right, but ...
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2answers
158 views

'but' for contrast and 'but' for opposition

'But' does not mean the same thing in "I like pop music but my parents like classical music." and in "My parents have played a lot of classical music to me but I still don't like it." What is it ...
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14k views

“Often” and “oftentimes”

Is there any difference between the two terms 'often' and 'oftentimes'? They seem to be used interchangeably but is one more appropriate in certain situations than others? Is 'oftentimes' an older ...
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2answers
309 views

Short sentence with adjective and adverb

I think that this is a problem of the usage of adjectives and adverbs (that's why I chose this title): I have a sentence in my presentation, which clarifies that a procedure uses only observations ...
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2answers
6k views

“Not the same as” vs. “not the same like” [closed]

"Not the same as" and "not the same like" sound both strange to me (non-native speaker). Google finds both versions. Are both okay? Is this phrasing used anyway or would people go for "different ...
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3answers
135 views

'Eventually' — in the past or by some point in the future

Consider the following exchange: Alice: Did Charlotte send you that email? Bob: No, but I'm sure she'll send it eventually. In this case, there's no upper bound on the period of time in which ...
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1answer
80 views

Where should I put “this afternoon” here in this sentence?

Sentence1: If, this afternoon, it is as sunny as it is now, we will go out. Sentence2: If it is as sunny this afternoon as it is now, we will go out. My question is which sentence is better. Where ...
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9answers
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Is “fastly” a correct word?

Slow has the adverb slowly. I tend to use fastly as the adverb for fast. However, it is underlined in most spell checkers I use, which makes me wonder about the existence of this word. Is fastly a ...
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2answers
643 views

What is correct “Blazing Fast Speed” or “Blazingly Fast Speed”?

Which is correct? "Blazing Fast Speed" or "Blazingly Fast Speed"? In my opinion, the latter because one can't say, for one, "Amazing Fast Speed", right? Admittedly NY Times use it a lot but...: NY ...
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6answers
2k views

Are the rules regarding absolute modifiers too absolute?

A common grammar lesson that was taught to me in the US and that I've had to teach abroad in EFL classrooms is that we're not to use adverbs of emphasis with absolute modifiers, just as we're not ...
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3answers
618 views

He truly is great or he is truly great?

Where is the correct place to put the "is"? I speak several languages and get confused when switching from one to the other.
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4answers
117k views

Is it “peek”, “peak” or “pique”?

I have always thought the phrase was "pique my interest" as in: "Her mysterious background piqued my interest". However, of late, on blogs and social networks, I have seen people using "peek my ...
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2answers
3k views

“Most every” and “almost every”

What is the difference between "most every" and "almost every"? Do they differ in amount?
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5answers
431 views

Is “almost exactly” correct English?

Is the collocation "almost exactly" grammatical, when one is trying to express that something is almost at the edge of being exact? E.g.: ...and it's almost exactly like...
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4answers
207 views

As quick as we can?

Is it acceptable to say "We'll get back to you as quick as we can"? Is "quick" a flat adverb in this case?
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2answers
122 views

Substitution of adverb by another “equivalent” word?

In the sentence: Her voice sounds beautiful. She sang the song exactly as it was written. We heard it perfectly. Isn't it feasible to substitute the last word by "perfect"? In Spanish both ways are ...
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0answers
44 views

Adverb for “friendly” [duplicate]

Some adjectives already end in -ly, e.g. friendly, lovely, silly, lonely. How do I form the corresponding adverb? For example: Sara is a friendly girl. She talks to me [adverb corresponding to ...
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1answer
949 views

Is “wrongly” even a word? [closed]

I came across a news article using the word wrongly. I was told that wrongly isn't a real word. But I saw this in a leading newspaper and wanted a clarification. Also, what is the difference between ...
0
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1answer
476 views

has just had or just had a baby

My question is not whether the correct grammar is either "She has just had a baby" or "She just had a baby". I am aware that the official grammar is "She has just had a baby". But in a way that ...
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3answers
320 views

Payment to be due within three months “of” that meeting

Does the word "of" in the context of an established point in time refer to before or after that established point in time?
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1answer
266 views

Do all variations of this sentence seem grammatically correct? [duplicate]

There is an interesting English sentence which is making rounds in the social media nowadays. It goes like this: For the following sentence, add the word "only" anywhere in this sentence, and ...
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0answers
18 views

Which is correct “increasingly easy” or “increasingly easier” [duplicate]

I was wondering which of the following is correct increasingly easy or increasingly easier. I had a notion that increasingly easier is correct since we are comparing with the past. However, this and ...
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1answer
980 views

“They had already decided what to do” vs. “they had decided what to do already”

I was surprised that they had already decided what to do. I was surprised that they had decided what to do already. Which sentence is correct?
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2answers
4k views

Meaning of “excited much”, “stalker much”

What does 'excited much' or 'stalker much' mean exactly, and which context are they used in? I don't get the usage of much after a noun or adjective. I often see this construction in comments, for ...
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1answer
76 views

Bad or Badly, which is correct? [duplicate]

Consider this sentence: I want to join the contest.. Which is more correct, "so bad" or "so badly"? I'm leaning towards the latter because it is an adverb and an adverb is required to describe ...
9
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5answers
4k views

Should “anymore” only be used in a negative statement or question?

I don't know why this is so, but I've always believed that the word anymore should only be used in a question or negative statement. Do you go there anymore? Don't do that anymore. But I often ...
30
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6answers
101k views

Is it “Yours faithfully” or “Yours sincerely”?

When should one sign a letter with "Yours faithfully" or "Yours sincerely"?
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6answers
694 views

What is “long” doing in “all (time-period) long”?

What part of speech is long playing the part of in the bold parts of the quotations below? For one thing, it shows at a glance how much money is on hand for any particular purpose all month long. ...
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3answers
5k views

“Feel like at home”

Feel like at home. Is it correct or must it be "feel at home"? It is in a Euro 2012 commercial, however some experts say it's not correct.
11
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5answers
1k views

“physically attractive” vs. “attractive physically”

I have come across the following sentence in a dictionary: Though not very attractive physically, she possessed a good sense of humour. I think the adverb "physically" postmodifies the ...
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3answers
2k views

“Recently” vs. “lately”

I haven't seen Mr. John __. Which is correct, recently or lately? My uncle has been to Germany lately. Why is the correct answer in the second example lately and not recently?
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11answers
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Is the usage of 'personally' in 'I personally don't like something' redundant?

What is the difference between the following? I personally don't like wax museums. I don't like wax museums. The adverb personally does not seem to emphasize anything here. Is it ...
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3answers
178 views

“Currently the environment is so contaminated” vs. “the environment is currently so contaminated”

Currently the environment is so contaminated that urgent measures should be taken. The environment is currently so contaminated that urgent measures should be taken. Are both sentences ...
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2answers
2k views

“There are still problems” vs. “there still are problems”

There are still problems. There still are problems. Is one word order more correct than the other and do they have identical meaning?
0
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2answers
70 views

Which degree should be used? [closed]

Which degree of 'less' is correct in the following sentence - "Seats in this room are much less/lesser in comparison to the adjacent one." Also please state any general rule of English if it is being ...
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2answers
136 views

Placement of 'always'

Which of the following is the most appropriate usage "You have to be always logical in your analysis." "You always have to be logical in your analysis." "You have to be logical in your ...
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2answers
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Difference between 'such as' and 'like'

This one never ceases to confuse me. When to use 'such as' and when to use 'like' while giving examples? Is there any clear rule? Metros like Mumbai, Delhi and Karachi are unsafe after dark. ...
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3answers
168 views

“His words reached her nicely”

Someone told me I can't say, someone's words reached someone else nicely. For example: "His/your words reached me nicely" Is that true?
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2answers
226 views

'solid' used as an adverb

The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th Edition contains the following (on the hyphenation or otherwise of compounds): 6.38: The trend in spelling compound words has been away from the use of hyphens; ...
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2answers
66 views

Usage of the word 'adroitly'

Is it correct to say that a barkeep was "adroitly pouring out drinks behind the bar"? Something rubs me the wrong way here. Perhaps it would be better to use some synonym in this context? If so, which ...
2
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1answer
775 views

“Have you gone” vs. “have you ever gone”

When talking about past experience, what is the difference between these two sentences? Have you gone to Hong Kong? Have you ever gone to Hong Kong?
2
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3answers
4k views

How to use 'even so'?

We were staying at the most expensive hotel in town. But, even so, there were no toilet rolls in the washroom. I was struck by the use of 'even so' in the above sentence. Is it correct? Shouldn't it ...
3
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3answers
745 views

Does this ‘twice’ mean two times, or double in quantity?

She caught sight of Mr. Diggory’s feet, and slowly, tremulously, raised her eyes to stare up into his face; then, more slowly still, she looked up into the sky. Harry could see the floating skull ...
2
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3answers
684 views

Is it right to use comma before “here”?

Members of parliament can criticize other members, here. Note the comma after members and before here. In this particular case, is it okay? Or should the comma not be there?
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5answers
36k views

Should an adverb go before or after a verb?

For example: The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. The word turns up rarely outside of those contexts. Which one is correct and why?
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3answers
839 views

Is there any real difference between “to” as a preposition and “to” as an adverb?

I'm really in doubt. On the free dictionary I read this concept of "to" as a preposition: "1. (used for expressing motion or direction toward a place, person, or thing approached and reached): Come to ...
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1answer
190 views

What does “mostly” modify? [closed]

"My friends are mostly non-smokers." Is "mostly" a focusing adverb that modifies "non-smokers"?