An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Grammaticality of “What is there there?”

If someone says I am going to the market I may ask What is there at the market? If someone says I am going to the bookstore I may ask What is there at the bookstore? If someone ...
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Adverb clause: his delight evident

I recently have come across a clause, his delight evident, reading a novel. Which I have found tricky to understand. I have been able to get to the meaning yet not to the structure it possesses. Here ...
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“I actually might have to X” vs. “I might actually have to X” vs. “I might have to actually X”

Even if there are four fan headers on the motherboard my computer case accommodates six fans (3x140mm, 3x120mm) so I actually might have to purchase an external fan hub. Where should I put the ...
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1answer
1k views

Is “majorily” a word? [closed]

For years I have been using "majorily" in a sentence to identify the majority class. For example: "The balloons were majorily red, with a few blue balloons scattered about." or "When it comes to fish; ...
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285 views

Is there a word to describe being mentally fatigued?

"I'm tired" or "I'm exhausted" usually convey physical fatigue (or are ambiguous between physical and mental fatigue). What I'm looking for is an efficient way of conveying mental fatigue.
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the difference between “really” and “very”

Is the statement below true about the difference between really and very when really means “very” in the example “It’s very/really hot in the summer”? “Really” shows more involvement, even ...
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0answers
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Placement of adverb relative to verb [duplicate]

What is the preferred choice below? A) "The order was unexpectedly cancelled." B) "The order was cancelled unexpectedly." I am guessing "cancelled" is a verb and "unexpectedly" is an adverb. ...
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5k views

Why Is “You did well.” Even Grammatically Correct (American English)?

One of the classic battles prescriptive grammarians fight is that "You did good." is grammatically wrong, while "You did well." is correct. The justification for this is that "well" is a legitimate ...
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5answers
230 views

Is there a word for overly friendly speech from someone who insults you behind your back?

Is there a verb or adverb to describe the overly friendly speech or tone of someone who has said something bad about you behind your back but doesn't know that you know?
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2answers
1k views

position of “only”

Which sentence is correct? (A) Mosquito larvae can only be seen through a microscope. (B) Mosquito larvae can be only seen through a microscope. (C) Mosquito larvae can be seen only through ...
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3answers
113 views

The day started off incredibly terribly?

Is it grammatically correct to say: The day started off incredibly terribly. My reasoning is that it is, since this is correct: The day started off terribly. The manner in which the day ...
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3answers
880 views

“put your coat on” and “put on your coat” but not “depend on someone” and “depend someone on*”

Why can you say "put on your coat" and "put your coat on" but not "depend on someone" and "depend someone on*"? Why are adverbs ("on" in the first sentence) mobile, whereas prepositions ("on" in the ...
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2answers
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Is “best” an adverb?

In the sentence below, is best an adverb? If so, what does it modify, left or are? We’re best left alone.
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1answer
295 views

A Question on Parallelism

Sample sentence: "With three days remaining in the term, Mitzy started doing research, creating an outline, and wrote a rough draft." In this case, is "doing" a verb in parallel with "creating" but ...
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You are in Jonathan’s circles: “too” or “as well” or “also”?

I just read on Google+ that: You are in Jonathan’s circles too But I always thought that you couldn't use too there. Am I wrong? (because Google can't be wrong, right?)
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1answer
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Difference between: Also, too and as well [duplicate]

I understand that the correct usage of also is with a verb: She was smart, she also studied so much. However, my trouble is with too and as well, I have been reading and I just found that as ...
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2answers
310 views

Adverb for 'within a short timeframe'

Please come by the Secretary's Office so we can solve your problem [on the spot]. What I want to say instead of the placeholder is that as soon as the person comes to the office (be it today or ...
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2answers
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“Each” — pronoun or adverb

I am looking at these two sentences: M and W are letters that each have 4 strokes. M and W are letters and each has 4 strokes. It seems that each is an adverb in (1) but a pronoun in ...
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5answers
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Is 'lightning' here a noun or an adjective or even an adverb?

Oxford Dictionaries has this example under ADJECTIVE 'lightning': (1) Roman is lightning quick and improving every day in practice, and Bean showed playmaking ability in the preseason. The ...
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Why do many professional writers hate adverbs, and what should be used in their place?

In response to the death of Elmore Leonard the New York Times has posted a list of writing tips he composed back in 2001. Among them is the following: To use an adverb this way (or almost any way) ...
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1answer
891 views

Is this a correct English sentence: “I'm not quite well enough ready yet.”

I was talking to someone recently and blurted out as I had to move on to another task "I am not quite well enough ready yet" which sparked a discussion about if that was correct English. Although I'll ...
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1answer
232 views

Double Adverb Use e.g. *equally shockingly* [closed]

Yesterday, my biology instructor said (I'm paraphrasing here): "Shockingly, this cell does blah blah blah, and equally shockingly, the cell blah blah blah." Is this proper grammar (I speak American ...
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“Nowadays” vs “today”

I'm taking an English academic writing course. My teacher recommended using today as it is more accepted compared to nowadays. I asked her if this is accepted in American English (she's from US) or in ...
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4answers
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Are the words “sillily”, “uglily”, “friendlily”, “livelily”, etc., valid English?

I have wondered about how to make the words silly, ugly, friendly, lively, etc. into adverbs, so I researched in the Internet. I found many different answers, so I tried checking Oxford Dictionaries. ...
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6answers
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“I kindly ask to” vs “I ask to kindly”

Let's take the following two sentences as examples: I kindly ask you to send the letter to your boss. I ask you to kindly send the letter to your boss. It would be kind of you to send the letter to ...
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Is there an -ically suffixed word to describe a duration?

We know about chronologically to describe order by time, but is there a word to describe duration? I want to say something like "school is x-ically taxing", as in, school is heavily taxing on an ...
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1answer
126 views

Does the adverb “quitely” exist?

I was surprised not to find the adverb "quitely" in my dictionary whereas I am pretty sure that I saw it several times. Does it exist or is it a (common?) mistake?
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Is 'there' an adverb or a preposition? (Or something else entirely!?)

Most dictionaries seem to describe 'there' as an adverb. Oxford online dictionary definition Is this true? "Last year we went to Paris. We stayed there for three nights." In sentences like this ...
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292 views

Adverb for “multiple”

Say that I have a Pokemon with 2 types: Fire and Flying. One could say this Pokemon has "multiple types." That is because the designer of this Pokemon "typed" it that way. Is it correct to say the ...
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397 views

Adverb order: 'has largely been' or 'has been largely' [duplicate]

Does the placement of an adverb affect its meaning or application? Does each paired sentence here mean the same as the other? 1.1 Mobile technology progress has largely been consumer-driven ...
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422 views

Is it possible to say so very and very so?

I know that it is correct to use: Thank you so very much. As much as I know an adverb can be theoretically used to modify another adverb, so my question is: Is it possible to say very so ...
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Is the following usage of “matter-of-factly” correct?

Most of the usage of "matter-of-factly" that I've seen is to describe a manner of speaking - "He said, matter of factly,...", etc. A friend brought up the following usage, which seems wrong, but I ...
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7answers
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How common is “thrice”?

Our proofreader, a native speaker of American English, just won't let me use this word. Every single time I try to sneak it onto one of our sites, she replaces it with three times. Now, I do realize ...
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305 views

What should I use between “triple” vs. “all”?

If I have 2 pens and I want to say all of them are green, I can say "Both of them are green" but if I have 3 pens should I use "Triple of them are green" or "All of them are green"?
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2answers
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Once/twice/thrice vs one/two/three times

Is there a difference in nuance when using once, twice or thrice instead of one time, two times or three times, especially when counting occurrences? It has happened twice before. It has ...
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1answer
434 views

What comes after thrice? [duplicate]

When you want to say something occurred only one time, it's "once". Two is twice, three is thrice. What's for four?
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7answers
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Is there a word/term for “verbs which indicate the underlying sentiment of a statement”?

Sorry, I'm not sure the best way to describe this, but hopefully you understand what I mean. Something like the result of the verb(to say) and any adverb(insultingly) = verb(to insult). Another way ...
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10answers
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Term meaning careful and thorough, almost excessively so [duplicate]

I'm trying to think of a term which means that one expends extra effort or materials in making sure that something is done properly, to an almost excessive or extravagant extent. One good is example ...
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3answers
954 views

Is it wrong to use “never” for a specific time period?

I usually come late to the daily scrum meetings (but I do compensate, by working late!). For the last 6 working days, I have been coming on time, or even slightly earlier. At lunch, I told my ...
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288 views

How do I say “every three hours” in one word?

Given that tri-hourly means thrice every hour, how then do I say every three hours?
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What's the Best English word for 6 months in this group: daily, weekly, quarterly, 6 months, yearly? [duplicate]

While writing programs, I need to create a drop down for setting periods, like daily, weekly, monthly, etc. Using one year as a time frame. This question is driven by lack of a better word. I've had ...
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1answer
334 views

Adverbial form for a common swear word

Is shittly a word (and if so, how many t’s does it have?) or do I have to use shittily?
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1answer
562 views

Correct use of “immediately” [duplicate]

I have two variants of one sentence and I want to find out which of them is correct and why: So you'll see immediately the notification when the crucial for you information changes. So you’ll ...
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2answers
161 views

Classification - There is/are

What is the official 'name' for the 'there is' / 'there are' construction? Is it a verb phrase or a lexical verb? I'd say possibly a verb but it must be the most difficult term to Google.
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On the part of speech of “now”

I recently had a conversation about the Spanish word "ahora", in which my conversant claimed that "ahora" is always an adverb, and never a noun. This lead me to investigate the part of speech of ...
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2answers
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“Cheat legal” - grammatically correct?

The slogan Cheat legal! used by the Australian company SKINS has bugged me every since I saw their advertisement on TV. Only recently, I realized that there is a chance that it may actually be ...
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3answers
243 views

The correct positioning of a sentence adverb in a sentence [duplicate]

Three days? I think that it is not simply enough time. Three days? I think that it is simply not enough time What rule of grammar informs acceptable word order in this case?
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1answer
1k views

When to use more or -er [duplicate]

Is there a rule as to when I use "more" in a sentence or "-er"? For example, "I think it would be more fun/funner if we stayed home tonight." I know the correct usage in this sentence but is there a ...
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259 views

When does one append “-ly”?

I am trying to understand the difference between adjectives that end in ‑ly compared with adjectives that do not end end in ‑ly. For example (the ones I would have chosen are bold): A tactical ...