An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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1answer
556 views

When to use wrong or wrongly as adverbs? [duplicate]

It seems that wrong is not only an adjective, but is also a proper adverb ("You're doing it wrong!", right?). There's, however, an adverb wrongly, which probably means the same thing. Talking about ...
6
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1answer
771 views

Which is correct here: “arbitrary” or “arbitrarily”?

Do you say "an arbitrarily small constant epsilon" or "an arbitrary small constant epsilon"? Or are both correct?
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2answers
81 views

Why isn't “safely disposing” written as “safe disposing” instead?

The cost of safely disposing of the toxic chemicals is approximately five times what the company paid to purchase them. The -ing and of seem indicate that "disposing" is a noun, and since ...
16
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4answers
28k views

“Can hardly wait” versus “can't hardly wait”

This has been bothering me for a while and I'm finally at a forum where I feel like I might get an answer. I have heard people say "I can hardly wait for summer to get here" and I've also heard "I ...
0
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1answer
314 views

Positive and negative clause comparison in the same sentence

What is the right way to perform a positive and a negative adverb comparison in the beginning of the sentence? As an example, which of the following ways is correct: Similarly to yesterday, and ...
0
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1answer
82 views

“distinguish them more completely” vs. “more completely distinguish them”

Is there a rule I could tell the difference between: Both A and B have other attributes that distinguish them more completely. Both A and B have other attributes that more completely ...
1
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1answer
105 views

some time vs sometime

Is there a rule for "some time" vs "sometime"? For example: Don’t trust your memory to recall noteworthy situations and events some time (sometime) later.
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2answers
746 views

How do you modify an adverb with another adverb?

This is the case I have in mind. I wish to express that impact acted in a way that was severely adverse. It impacted her severely adversely. The proposed text above doesn't feel right at all, ...
4
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1answer
304 views

How does one decide whether an adverb of manner should precede or follow the verb?

How does one decide whether an adverb of manner should precede or follow the verb? In some cases, it seems to be more natural to have the adverb follow the verb, as in: “She moved slowly and spoke ...
3
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3answers
130 views

Adverb for a person who is not the subject

If I went home and was happy to do so, I can say that "I went home happily". If I sent somebody else home and he was happy to do so, can I say that "I sent Johnny home happily"? This doesn't sound ...
3
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2answers
711 views

The position of “always” in different sentences [closed]

I want to know about the position of always in different sentences. For example: Always she is tidy and on time. Is it correct or not?
4
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3answers
217 views

“The same X” and intransitive verbs

As I have had explained to me at great length, wonder is intransitive. That's fine, but it can seem to take an object: Jim: Yesterday I wondered what that mark on the wall was made by Dave: I ...
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2answers
66 views

Usage of 'bovinely' when fastness or slowness are involved

I know that in English 'I tried to go as slow as possible' and 'I tried to go as fast as possible' have a very different meaning, but I'm unsure how 'bovinely', before 'possible', change that ...
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0answers
49 views

“Down for” something vs. “Up for” something? [duplicate]

Is there any difference between someone saying they're "down for" something as opposed to being "up for" something? For example: I'm totally up for ice cream tonight! vs. I'm totally down ...
4
votes
1answer
5k views

“Lately” and “recently” in Present Perfect

If I use Present Perfect Progressive and Present Perfect with an expression of unfinished time, it implies that the action is continuing. But what about recently and lately — when used with ...
1
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0answers
26 views

“Went to school happily” vs. “happily went to school” vs. “went happily to school” [duplicate]

The boy went to school happily. The boy happily went to school. The boy went happily to school. If the adverb “happily” is allowed to be put in the three places above, what are the ...
0
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2answers
139 views

What are the differences between “go to school happily”, “go happily to school” and “happily go to school”?

There are three similar phrases which I would like to know the differences between: go to school happily go happily to school happily go to school I have long been confused by the ...
-1
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1answer
34 views

I was wondering whether it is acceptable to put the adverb “rudely” in the following three places in this sentence

sentence: The man looked at me. 1 The man looked at me rudely. 2 The man rudely looked at me. 3 The man looked rudely at me.
11
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2answers
450 views

Can the verb 'be' be modified?

Comments on this question, now closed, considered whether the verb be could be modified by an adverb. This seems a question worth pursuing in its own right, so may I ask what completely modifies in ...
2
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2answers
11k views

“Consequently” versus “consequentially”

What is the difference between consequently and consequentially? My usage being what it is, and also according to the dictionary sample sentences I've found so far (thank you for the helpful comment ...
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2answers
529 views

Inversion or no inversion after “only”?

Only now you can even get them on top of wrinkles. Only infrequently does it happen. As one of our members has said, inversion happens when a sentence starts with "only" and never ...
2
votes
1answer
348 views

adverbs modifying noun phrases and licensing their own complements

[i] Harry looked down at his empty gold plate. He had only just realized how hungry he was. The pumpkin pasties seemed ages ago. (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) [ii] Albus Dumbledore ...
2
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4answers
4k views

What is the difference between “truthfully” and “honestly”?

These are different words, and their usage (context) differs substantially. How would you define them or explain the difference (if you believe there is one)?
2
votes
2answers
204 views

A word meaning “To bring out of retirement” / “To bring back into use”

(Re)instate? -- Seems too specific. (Re-)employ? -- Seems to apply to both machines and people, which is useful. But re-employ seems too general. Activate? -- Seems most appropriate perhaps, although ...
5
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2answers
10k views

The correct use of the word “vicariously”

Is it correct English when someone says that they live vicariously through something? If I were to say “I live through the TV”, would I not be living vicariously? So therefore the word vicariously is ...
2
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3answers
199 views

“put your coat on” and “put on your coat” but not “depend on someone” and “depend someone on*”

Why can you say "put on your coat" and "put your coat on" but not "depend on someone" and "depend someone on*"? Why are adverbs ("on" in the first sentence) mobile, whereas prepositions ("on" in the ...
5
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2answers
2k views

Adverbs for Dirty (Dirtily?)

It is common to simply use 'dirty' as the adverb here, ex: He talks dirty. Other resources say that the adverb is dirtily! I do not believe I've ever heard this used... is it correct?
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6answers
2k views

What are the arguments behind the “literally”/“figuratively” usage divide? When should one use either word?

I remember reading, some time in grade school, that there was a controversy about proper usage of figuratively and literally when used to denote meaning of a word in its strictest sense — but ...
4
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2answers
297 views

Why is “hopefully” treated so mercilessly?

Is the word "hopefully" unjustly treated? We don't like the sentence: "Hopefully, my ship is just over the horizon and due in real soon now." But we don't mind saying: "Happily, the tree fell on ...
12
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1answer
1k views

What's the correct usage of “hopefully”?

I said, "Hopefully, I will get better" to a friend and he said that I was using it incorrectly, stating that hopefully is an adverb meaning "full of hope" that modifies a verb. It sounds right, but ...
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votes
2answers
180 views

'but' for contrast and 'but' for opposition

'But' does not mean the same thing in "I like pop music but my parents like classical music." and in "My parents have played a lot of classical music to me but I still don't like it." What is it ...
9
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3answers
15k views

“Often” and “oftentimes”

Is there any difference between the two terms 'often' and 'oftentimes'? They seem to be used interchangeably but is one more appropriate in certain situations than others? Is 'oftentimes' an older ...
0
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2answers
316 views

Short sentence with adjective and adverb

I think that this is a problem of the usage of adjectives and adverbs (that's why I chose this title): I have a sentence in my presentation, which clarifies that a procedure uses only observations ...
0
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2answers
6k views

“Not the same as” vs. “not the same like” [closed]

"Not the same as" and "not the same like" sound both strange to me (non-native speaker). Google finds both versions. Are both okay? Is this phrasing used anyway or would people go for "different ...
1
vote
3answers
141 views

'Eventually' — in the past or by some point in the future

Consider the following exchange: Alice: Did Charlotte send you that email? Bob: No, but I'm sure she'll send it eventually. In this case, there's no upper bound on the period of time in which ...
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votes
1answer
86 views

Where should I put “this afternoon” here in this sentence?

Sentence1: If, this afternoon, it is as sunny as it is now, we will go out. Sentence2: If it is as sunny this afternoon as it is now, we will go out. My question is which sentence is better. Where ...
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vote
2answers
761 views

What is correct “Blazing Fast Speed” or “Blazingly Fast Speed”?

Which is correct? "Blazing Fast Speed" or "Blazingly Fast Speed"? In my opinion, the latter because one can't say, for one, "Amazing Fast Speed", right? Admittedly NY Times use it a lot but...: NY ...
18
votes
6answers
2k views

Are the rules regarding absolute modifiers too absolute?

A common grammar lesson that was taught to me in the US and that I've had to teach abroad in EFL classrooms is that we're not to use adverbs of emphasis with absolute modifiers, just as we're not ...
0
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3answers
748 views

He truly is great or he is truly great?

Where is the correct place to put the "is"? I speak several languages and get confused when switching from one to the other.
27
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4answers
126k views

Is it “peek”, “peak” or “pique”?

I have always thought the phrase was "pique my interest" as in: "Her mysterious background piqued my interest". However, of late, on blogs and social networks, I have seen people using "peek my ...
4
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2answers
3k views

“Most every” and “almost every”

What is the difference between "most every" and "almost every"? Do they differ in amount?
0
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5answers
474 views

Is “almost exactly” correct English?

Is the collocation "almost exactly" grammatical, when one is trying to express that something is almost at the edge of being exact? E.g.: ...and it's almost exactly like...
3
votes
4answers
234 views

As quick as we can?

Is it acceptable to say "We'll get back to you as quick as we can"? Is "quick" a flat adverb in this case?
0
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2answers
127 views

Substitution of adverb by another “equivalent” word?

In the sentence: Her voice sounds beautiful. She sang the song exactly as it was written. We heard it perfectly. Isn't it feasible to substitute the last word by "perfect"? In Spanish both ways are ...
0
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0answers
44 views

Adverb for “friendly” [duplicate]

Some adjectives already end in -ly, e.g. friendly, lovely, silly, lonely. How do I form the corresponding adverb? For example: Sara is a friendly girl. She talks to me [adverb corresponding to ...
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1answer
1k views

Is “wrongly” even a word? [closed]

I came across a news article using the word wrongly. I was told that wrongly isn't a real word. But I saw this in a leading newspaper and wanted a clarification. Also, what is the difference between ...
0
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1answer
605 views

has just had or just had a baby

My question is not whether the correct grammar is either "She has just had a baby" or "She just had a baby". I am aware that the official grammar is "She has just had a baby". But in a way that ...
4
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3answers
343 views

Payment to be due within three months “of” that meeting

Does the word "of" in the context of an established point in time refer to before or after that established point in time?
0
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1answer
271 views

Do all variations of this sentence seem grammatically correct? [duplicate]

There is an interesting English sentence which is making rounds in the social media nowadays. It goes like this: For the following sentence, add the word "only" anywhere in this sentence, and ...
0
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0answers
18 views

Which is correct “increasingly easy” or “increasingly easier” [duplicate]

I was wondering which of the following is correct increasingly easy or increasingly easier. I had a notion that increasingly easier is correct since we are comparing with the past. However, this and ...