An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Is there an adjectival or adverbial form of “legacy”?

For example: This process orders entries in a <word-ic> way     (adjective) This process orders entries <word-ically>     (adverb) My first thought was ...
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81 views

How does adverb placement affect the meaning of a sentence?

I want to correct the following sentence so that it is grammatically correct and still conveys the original meaning: Many alcoholics attempt to conceal their problem from their fellow workers, but ...
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66 views

What to make of the following sentences that begin with why, when, where, or how? [duplicate]

Why you put yourself in this predicament is beyond me. When you leave for work is of your concern. Where we spend the night depends on the weather. How you finish the project is unimportant. ...
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85 views

Adverb of manner and participle in subjective participle construction

Why is an adverb of manner placed before participle in the sentence "We watched the temperature gradually rising"? I know that if the verb is transitive, then the adverb of manner can be placed ...
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1answer
107 views

Looking for a non -ly word to use instead of certainly

I'm writing a seminar on a book as a school assignment, and I need a word to replace "certainly", as in "this is certainly true", because I want to avoid using words that end in -ly.
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121 views

Punctuation before and within an adverb clause

I have a sentence which includes two independent elements connected by 'and' within an adverb clause. Do I still place a comma before the and? Ex: Jett's dad died when he was seven and his little ...
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36 views

What does bi-weekly mean? [duplicate]

I was confused while looking for the meaning of bi-weekly. Is it twice per week or once per two weeks?
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30 views

Difference(s) between Especially and Specially [duplicate]

I have really hard time to figure out when to use Specially and when to use Especially. Since both are adverbs, that makes it even harder. Can anyone simply give a way to distinguish between these two ...
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70 views

About the usage of an adverb “at all”

I found this phrase from a book I am reading now. "Tommy did not seem at all dejected." It sounded unnatural to me. And why not something like "Tommy did not seem dejected at all." I feel like more ...
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102 views

Are proper adverbs falling out of usage in current spoken American English?

While watching American movies and TV series, I notice that in dialogue very often the usage of a proper adverb is replaced by the corresponding adjective (in the case where the adverb is formed by ...
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58 views

Very much? What?

In this sentence: The air force and navy were modernized but the army, very much the poor relation, was not. The "very much" used here seems to be different from the "very much" of "thank you ...
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122 views

Can “proper” be used proper as an adverb? [duplicate]

Which one is correct? I hope I thanked you proper! I hope I thanked you properly!
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54 views

What “degrees” of consideration are there? [closed]

I am seriously considering taking English lessons Are there other degrees of consideration that are a little less serious?
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439 views

Is it ok to use “finally” at the end of the sentence like this?

Is it OK to use finally at the end of the sentence like this? I am a teacher finally. Or are the below ones only possible? I finally am a teacher. I am finally a teacher. Most people ...
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119 views

Adverbial form of “pixel”?

I know that the verbal and verbal-noun forms of pixel are pixelate and pixelation, respectively, but what is/are the adverbial form(s) of the term? I looked on the OED, ODO, Merriam-Webster Online, ...
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65 views

How can you use Fuzzily in a sentence? [closed]

I typed fuzzily in a spell-checked field on a website and was surprised to see it said it was correct. I looked it up on Merriam-Webster, and sure enough they list it as a word: fuzz·i·ly \ˈfə-zə-...
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103 views

Modern words for “contrariwise”

Does contrariwise sound old-fashioned? As in Alice in Wonderland: ‘Contrariwise,’ continued Tweedledee, ‘if it was so, it might be.’ What are the modern words for contrariwise?
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58 views

the order of several adverbs of time

When I'm given several adverbs of time how do I arrange them? For example, I need to insert these adverbs: in the morning / that Thursday / March 22, 2013 into this sentence: A tornado had ...
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353 views

Is it appropriate to say “I've never been” when referring to a place, omitting the adverb “there” from the phrase?

I have been hearing the phrase "I've never been" with increasing frequency lately when referring to places (i.e., "I'd like to go to the Apollo. I've never been" as opposed to "I've never been there")....
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What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?

If I had to guess I'd say it's an adverb, modifying the verb "bring," but it seems like it could also be interpreted as a preposition with "home" as the object. Both? Neither? Thanks for any help.
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118 views

How do you know if a derivative word is actually an English word? [duplicate]

For example, "recidivistic" can be found in Merriam-Webster as an adjective derivative of recidivist. How do I know if "recidivistically" is adverb form of "recidivistic"? It is not listed in Merriam-...
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“I wish for a rest now”: what does “now” modify?

Consider this sentence: I am truly amazed by my success at this diagramming business, but I wish for a rest now. I think that the adverb "now" modifies "rest". But according to the answer page, ...
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4answers
725 views

Is “when” an adverb in this usage?

'When did you last see him?' In the above sentence, is "when" an adverb? If so, what word is it modifying?
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230 views

The correct syntactic usage of “Only”

Question #1: Which of the following sentences has the correct syntactic usage of the word "only"? Question #2: What do the remaining sentences mean? Examples: Only I gave him $1. I only ...
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96 views

Redundancy in “becoming increasingly”

Isn't it redundant to say "becoming increasingly (adjective)"? I know this is a common construction, but it seems to me that increasingly already includes the idea that it is already (adjective) but ...
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3answers
54 views

In “Bugger Indian passport”, is bugger an adjective of “passport” or of “India”?

One of my friends said this. I have been pretty sure bugger is an adjective of the "passport". But, I was surprised that some of my friends interpreted as an adjective of "India". And some ...
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95 views

How can nouns be used to modify adjectives?

I know you can "as a " after an adjective. Is there a way to use the noun like an adverb? My logic tells me that I'd need to add a suffix to make it an adjective ("-like", "-ish"). Then, I'd need ...
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Where is the right place to put “only” [duplicate]

I'm unsure where to put the word "only" in the following sentence: The machine must be operated by the authorized personnel from [company X] only. The machine must only be operated by the ...
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3answers
380 views

Verb + '-ly' = adjectvie?

I am learning in Korea. So I rarely have an opportunity of real English. Anyway, My Teacher said that 'noun + -ly = adjective' and 'adjective + -ly = adverbs' Then, what about 'verb + -ly'? Is it ...
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2answers
2k views

When to use “most” or “the most”

I came across with this sentence and it cast me doubt the usage of "most" and "the most" The sentence states: "But what I remembered most is moving a lot" Would it change the meaning of the ...
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2answers
85 views

What does “over” mean in this question? [closed]

I'd like to know whether "over" is necessary or not in the following question: Do you want to come over for dinner tonight?
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53 views

Is “'as' + article + adjective + noun + 'as'” grammatically correct?

The sentiments expressed in the tweets can be as accurate a measure as is found with traditional telephone surveys. The sentence above is grammatically correct. I wonder if it is still ok when I ...
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266 views

Relative adverbs

I am having some trouble understanding why relative adverbs function as adverbs in a relative clause. My family worships in a church, where my parents married. In the above example, I understand "...
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186 views

Adverb or adjective when used to describe an infinitive?

"To play basketball" is an infinitive phrase. An infinitive phrase is generally used as a noun. Is the word "professionally" as in "To play basketball professionally..." an adjective or an adverb? Is ...
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117 views

What's the correct adverb to go with “renovated”? [closed]

I've come across the following on billboards: "Newly renovated suites..." It's apparent that the intended meaning here is "recently" and so I believe that "newly" may not be appropriate to go with "...
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2answers
329 views

Past Participle as Adverb

I just read the following sentence from a German native speaker: We have to do this coordinated. I am also German native speaker, so this sentence sounds like a straight translation of Wir ...
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1answer
56 views

Using ‘later’ when the amount of time is a complex phrase

In sentences like ‘The speed 10 seconds later is 3 m/s’ the amount of time is easy to specify. But what can I do if it is a complex phrase? In particular, I should like to express v(t + dt) in words, ...
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463 views

Where is the right place for the adverb 'well' in a sentence?

I want to write: "I understand something." But I want add emphasis by including the adverb "well". Which is the right place for it? I well understand something. I understand well something. I ...
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307 views

Order of multiple adverbs

1) Нe went upstairs quietly last night. 2) Нe quietly went upstairs last night. What version is right? I can't find information about this issue.
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155 views

Conjunctive adverbs preceded by conjunctions

I've been under the impression that conjunctive adverbs needn't be preceded by a full-ish stop (e.g., a period or semicolon). I don't know where I got that idea, and consequently, as a lover of ...
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398 views

Posititon of an adverb of manner with participles

I have seen many rules about position of an adverbs with finite forms of verbs but I can't find the rule about where to place an adverb with nonfinitive verbs. For example which of the sentence sounds ...
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132 views

Why is 'X notwithstanding' more correct than 'notwithstanding X'?

Source: p 575, Garner's Modern American Usage (3 ed; 2009), by Bryan Garner: notwithstanding is a FORMAL WORD, used in the sense "despite," "in spite of," or "although." E.g., "Notwithstanding an ...
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1answer
53 views

Order of adverbs

Is there any specific rationale behind ordering similar adverbs? Clearly, I point out time adverbs, never and ever. I've found examples in which these two used in different orders. My mom will ...
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1answer
42 views

What should I say? Across or between camera views?

My question is regarding the usage of "across" and "between". I want to say that a person is viewed by one camera, then disappears and, after a while is sensed by a different cameras. I wrote "....
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2answers
163 views

Can adverbs be qualified as transitive/intransitive?

In my english lesson today i was told that "afterwards" is an intransitive adverb (I cannot write "afterwards this") while "after" is a transitive adverb. Is this distinction transitive/intransitive ...
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1answer
879 views

Can you start a sentence with “Hopefully,…”? [duplicate]

I am studying for the SAT, and I learned just now that the following sentence is grammatically incorrect: Hopefully, we will be able to complete the building before the rainy season sets in. ...
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4k views

However vs. how ever: one word or two?

I am writing a paper and stumbled upon this sentence of mine. "The output remained consistently poor however the data was/were analysed". "The output remained consistently poor how ever the ...
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“more than usual” vs. “more than usually”

Which sentence is correct? "I had more customers than usual." "I had more customers than usually." "More than usual" sounds pretty common, but "more than usually" seems more correct when I think ...
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“I weigh about 5 lbs.”

This stems from a discussion over on ELL which has moved beyond being useful to second-language learners. In short, consider the sentence: I weigh about 5 pounds. What part of speech is "about?"...
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367 views

What part of speech is 'closer' functioning as in 'I moved closer'?

'I moved closer.' At face value, 'closer' seems to be acting like an adjective; however, I don't see anything in the sentence to which it can refer. A friend suggested that 'to move closer', 'to ...