An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
3answers
67 views

“force kill” vs “forcibly kill”

To my knowledge, force can be used as a noun or verb, but cannot be used as an adverb. However, google tells me: there are over 72,000 results for "force kill a process" while, there are only 9200 ...
2
votes
3answers
372 views

Why do we say “so much more” rather than “so more ”? Why do we have to put the much in?

If the definition of the word so is an extent, then why do we have to put another word that describes a quantity after it, as "so much more" or "so much better"? Why can't we just say, so more or so ...
2
votes
1answer
121 views

Will I love you forever? or Will I love you for ever?

http://youtu.be/cgNMSJTevAk?t=2m10s This test states that the correct answer is: "Will I love you for ever?" There are numerous songs\articles on the internet that say that "forever" is the right ...
2
votes
2answers
162 views

Conjugations of Ancillary

Ancillary is already something of an uncommon word in conversation, but it came up recently in a StackOverflow chat room in the following example: Person 1: "Are you talking about me?" Person 2: ...
2
votes
2answers
57 views

Difference between “hop the rocks quickly” and “quickly hop the rocks”

I'm trying to decide which sentence is correct, or if they both are. which would you recommend as easier to read/understand for the average reader? Hop the rocks quickly and get the star. ...
1
vote
2answers
130 views

Compound adverb — “kick-start a party soccer style”

I have asked this question in ELL site, but there were not much reply, and so I decided to ask the same question here. Though I will change the question a little bit to exactly what I need more and to ...
2
votes
1answer
192 views

Using “respectively” with “and” vs. “or”

Is it acceptable usage to use "or" with "respectively", or is it possible only with "and"? Example: If the light changes from red to blue or from blue to red, you must catch or throw the ball, ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

once, twice, thrice… was there more? [duplicate]

I realize everyone uses 'four times', 'five times'... in case of denoting something repeating more than three times. Even 'thrice' is currently gradually going extinct. But did English ever possess ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

Ordinal numbers as adverbs [duplicate]

I was once told not to end "firstly [point 1], secondly [point2], thirdly [point 3]" in -ly and to leave them as first, second, third etc. Is this always true or only in certain situations? Is it ever ...
3
votes
1answer
274 views

Why do we use “awfully” as an intensifier?

First, consider this sentence: We lost the game because we played awfully. Since "awful" means "very bad," it makes sense that "awfully" means "very badly." Now, consider these two sentences: ...
1
vote
2answers
90 views

“In here” or only “here” [closed]

I would use here with no preposition, like I wish you are here. They are coming here. However talking to a well-educated British woman I noted she would put an in before here. Since then I only ...
4
votes
7answers
540 views

Is there a word/term for “verbs which indicate the underlying sentiment of a statement”?

Sorry, I'm not sure the best way to describe this, but hopefully you understand what I mean. Something like the result of the verb(to say) and any adverb(insultingly) = verb(to insult). Another way ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Predicate adjective acceptable with “to do”

"I did good on the test." vs. "I did well on the test." The first example sounds fine to me, and the second a bit pedantic. Is the first example standard American English and, secondly, is "good" ...
1
vote
4answers
257 views

I'm looking for this word that means showing understanding or assent but may be faux assent

The word had been used with "nodding [such-ly]". If I remember correctly, the person I heard this from was describing one of the attributes you needed to be a manager was to be able to listen to ...
0
votes
4answers
501 views

Position of “yet” in a causative sentence

If I have to write a causative sentence in Present Perfect, where should I put yet, at the end of the question or right after the negation? She hasn't had her doors mended by the carpenter yet. ...
-1
votes
2answers
255 views

“I am a degree holder now” or “I am now a degree holder” [duplicate]

Which one is correct? I am a degree holder now. I am now a degree holder.
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Is “out” a preposition or an adverb in these sentences?

Is out a preposition or an adverb in these sentences? "We need to get the hell out of this place." "We need to get out and leave this place."
3
votes
1answer
133 views

“Money is all what/that I need.” [duplicate]

1.) Money is all that I need. 2.) Money is all what I need. Which one is right? or which one have you not ever seen? and is there any difference between them? But, what about the following? If ...
-2
votes
2answers
38 views

which one should I use for this question 'faster or fast' [closed]

I should walk _______ so I can catch up with my brother. Is the answer is fast or faster?
2
votes
6answers
548 views

Asking very strongly

I have a problem, how to intensify asking for something without turning to loaded, negative begging. Two heroic fugitives run from authorities and find a temporary hideout. Then two other brave souls ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “oftener” obsolete?

Does any native speaker of the English Language ever use oftener instead of more often?
1
vote
1answer
68 views

The recognition of the word “Enough”

I came across a sentence and had bugged me ever since. I cannot identify whether the word "Enough" is an adjective, a pronoun, a determiner or an adverb although I highly suspect that is an adjective ...
0
votes
1answer
818 views

How to properly identify adverbial modifiers? [closed]

I do not fully understand what they mean by structure of the adverbial modifier or type. Does 'type' mean the question it answers i.e. where, when, how? Below I listed the adverbial modifiers which ...
1
vote
2answers
153 views

To what extent is hardly a negative adverb?

The American Heritage Dictionary notes about adverbs like hardly that they are not truly negative in meaning. The sentence Mary hardly laughed means that Mary did laugh a little, not that she ...
0
votes
2answers
105 views

Is that sentence is correct [closed]

I wonder that following sentence is correct way to use? It is updated as the user inputs new information. Does As adverb is used in right way in that sentence? Or Do I have to use this sentence ...
1
vote
4answers
108 views

meaning of “yet” “as if”

I don't understand the second part of this sentence: The Berlin Congress of 1878 and the first set of frontiers drawn on maps ignored key components of local life, and yet they were drawn as ...
0
votes
2answers
579 views

Can 'Too+an adjective' be used to make a non-negative statement?

When one says the following type of sentences, they have a negative connotation. You are too nice. You are too fast. You are too intense. I am curious if there are any instances when we could ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Where to position adverbs

They may sound both correct but which one is more acceptable in standard written English? She is writing a letter now. or She is now writing a letter. Thanks
0
votes
2answers
198 views

Meaning of “sensorily”

As a non-native English speaker, I am having a hard time understanding what the author means by sensorily austere here. The quote is taken from Man in the landscape, by Paul Shepard. The desert is ...
2
votes
2answers
788 views

A relative adverb or a conjunction or both?

I am not familiar with the idea that an adverb can function as a conjunction at the same time. Here are a couple of sentences that are confusing me. This is the reason why she left him. ...and ...
1
vote
2answers
105 views

Adjective request for fast, lightweightness and multitasking [closed]

I am deciding some product name which has characteristics like Fast and lightweight and multitasking. Please suggest some name which includes these meaning or bird or animal which has such qualities. ...
0
votes
4answers
103 views

Is there an adverb for “quickly at first, slowly later”?

When water comes out of a faucet at the bottom of a tank, it comes out quickly first and then it tapers off. Is there an adverb for such a case?
0
votes
2answers
44 views

Offers home delivery vs home delivers

In which of these 2 sentences is the verb "Home deliver" used correctly, in compliance with the rest of the sentence? ABC offers home delivery of pharmaceuticals, compounded medications, and wellness ...
0
votes
4answers
511 views

Is it right to say “before since”?

I wonder if "before since" is right in my sentence. If not, could you please help me improve it? This company provides products since 2010. Consequently, there is no record of this product before ...
-1
votes
4answers
141 views

What word (e.g. eventually vs potentially) does express better the following scenario? [closed]

The scenario: a) John believes that Peter Parker has a PhD degree. b) Peter Parker is the spider man, but John does not know about this. Which sentence does express the scenario in the best ...
2
votes
4answers
413 views

Quantification of Frequency Adverbs

This is a list of common frequency adverbs in English with rough estimates of their absolute frequency someone has posted on an ESL study site: Always (100% of the time) Frequently (about 90% of ...
5
votes
5answers
1k views

“Love me tender”: adverb or adjective?

Is the last word in each of these phrases an adverb or an adjective? How can we know? love me tender treat me nice hold me tight
32
votes
19answers
6k views

What is the “thirsty” equivalent of “ravenously”?

When you eat something very hungrily, you can use the adverb "ravenously" to describe it. But when you drink something very fast in a similar way to quench your thirst, what adverb can you use to ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Is using “maybe” in combination with a conjugation of “to be” bad style?

I've read this answer about the difference between “maybe” and “may be”. It contains the sentence “maybe he is in the office today” as a correct example. In the above example “maybe” and “is” is ...
0
votes
1answer
440 views

Adverb position problems

I am confused about adverbs that can be placed in front of the verb as in: He quickly reads a book. And can be used at the end of the sentence as in: He works hardly Can I mix them as: ...
1
vote
3answers
289 views

Is there any archaic word for “finally”?

So I was wondering whether there is any archaic word that means "finally" or "at last"?
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

“Beautiful” or “beautifully” [closed]

Should I say You look beautifully today or You look beautiful today? In my opinion, the first form is correct because beautifully describes the verb and not the noun. Thus, I should use the beautiful ...
0
votes
2answers
86 views

Is there a difference between “good” and “well” when they are connected to subject via linking verb? [duplicate]

John is feeling well. John is feeling good. "well" is an adverb and "good" is an adjective. Is #2 grammatically correct at all or is it ok to construct Subject + Linking Verb + Adjective ...
1
vote
2answers
191 views

An adverb challenge

I was set the challenge to provide one particular adverb that can be used as verb modifier, adjective modifier and adverb modifier, and an example of its use in each of the cases. In addition the ...
1
vote
4answers
856 views

Need a word for "Should not have happened' with a negative context

I'm looking for a word to mean "should not have happened." I'm trying to relate this situation; two paths - one positive, one negative - with the same end result, and the negative path was taken. ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

Question on “Out of”

In "out of", is the "out" considered a preposition or an adverb?
4
votes
2answers
388 views

Translating Gerunds from Spanish to English (verb+ing)

In Spanish, the gerund form (-ando, -endo) is frequently used adverbially to modify and describe the verb: El alma es dichosa dando y sirviendo. El niño anda bailando. El artista vive provocando ...
5
votes
1answer
206 views

Use of an ~ing form with another verb

I'm not sure how to describe the use of the bolded words in the following cases: Pete is happy singing a song Anna talked screaming Mike entered the room screaming and laughing Is it ...
2
votes
2answers
986 views

Should I use a hyphen after -ly when modifying a verb in the past participle verb?

Which of these are acceptable? Is one preferable over the other? "Chemically-deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." "Chemically deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." Also, is the title to ...
0
votes
2answers
362 views

Is “like” used as an adjective by native speakers?

Do native speakers use like as an adjective? Is it a preferred usage?