An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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adverbs modifying noun phrases and licensing their own complements

[i] Harry looked down at his empty gold plate. He had only just realized how hungry he was. The pumpkin pasties seemed ages ago. (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) [ii] Albus Dumbledore ...
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834 views

He truly is great or he is truly great?

Where is the correct place to put the "is"? I speak several languages and get confused when switching from one to the other.
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46 views

“I love this version the best” or “I love this version the most”? [duplicate]

"I love this version the best" or "I love this version the most"? Are these both normative constructions? I have come to the realization that I am not sure whether "love this the best" is ...
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5answers
499 views

Is “almost exactly” correct English?

Is the collocation "almost exactly" grammatical, when one is trying to express that something is almost at the edge of being exact? E.g.: ...and it's almost exactly like...
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2answers
260 views

What is the comparative form of the adverb “nicely”?

The adjective nice can be inflected: nicer, nicest. Can the derived adverb nicely be inflected as well, or does it only have the absolute form?
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4answers
247 views

As quick as we can?

Is it acceptable to say "We'll get back to you as quick as we can"? Is "quick" a flat adverb in this case?
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2answers
128 views

Substitution of adverb by another “equivalent” word?

In the sentence: Her voice sounds beautiful. She sang the song exactly as it was written. We heard it perfectly. Isn't it feasible to substitute the last word by "perfect"? In Spanish both ways are ...
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44 views

Adverb for “friendly” [duplicate]

Some adjectives already end in -ly, e.g. friendly, lovely, silly, lonely. How do I form the corresponding adverb? For example: Sara is a friendly girl. She talks to me [adverb corresponding to ...
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1k views

Is “wrongly” even a word? [closed]

I came across a news article using the word wrongly. I was told that wrongly isn't a real word. But I saw this in a leading newspaper and wanted a clarification. Also, what is the difference between ...
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4answers
4k views

“Adverbial phrase” vs “Adverbial clause”

Please tell me what the difference is between an adverbial phrase and an adverbial clause.
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1answer
168 views

Is “ignorably” a word?

I would like to use ignorably as the adverb of ignorable but I am not sure whether this is correct. I did not find ignorably in any online dictionary. To give the context: Normally, you cannot ignore ...
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1answer
683 views

has just had or just had a baby

My question is not whether the correct grammar is either "She has just had a baby" or "She just had a baby". I am aware that the official grammar is "She has just had a baby". But in a way that ...
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18 views

Which is correct “increasingly easy” or “increasingly easier” [duplicate]

I was wondering which of the following is correct increasingly easy or increasingly easier. I had a notion that increasingly easier is correct since we are comparing with the past. However, this and ...
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1answer
1k views

“They had already decided what to do” vs. “they had decided what to do already”

I was surprised that they had already decided what to do. I was surprised that they had decided what to do already. Which sentence is correct?
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1answer
86 views

Bad or Badly, which is correct? [duplicate]

Consider this sentence: I want to join the contest.. Which is more correct, "so bad" or "so badly"? I'm leaning towards the latter because it is an adverb and an adverb is required to describe ...
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2answers
127 views

Placing “first” in a sentence; would it change the meaning?

How does the meaning of the following two sentences differ? I first wanted to tell you about it. I wanted to tell you about it first.
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1answer
276 views

Do all variations of this sentence seem grammatically correct? [duplicate]

There is an interesting English sentence which is making rounds in the social media nowadays. It goes like this: For the following sentence, add the word "only" anywhere in this sentence, and ...
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5answers
1k views

“physically attractive” vs. “attractive physically”

I have come across the following sentence in a dictionary: Though not very attractive physically, she possessed a good sense of humour. I think the adverb "physically" postmodifies the ...
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3answers
189 views

“Currently the environment is so contaminated” vs. “the environment is currently so contaminated”

Currently the environment is so contaminated that urgent measures should be taken. The environment is currently so contaminated that urgent measures should be taken. Are both sentences ...
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2answers
2k views

What does “enough” mean in expressions like “Fair enough” or “Funny enough”?

As a non-native speaker, I already get used to the word enough in expressions like those below, but I sometimes still got confused of it. It makes me wonder what it actually means and where does it ...
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2answers
2k views

“There are still problems” vs. “there still are problems”

There are still problems. There still are problems. Is one word order more correct than the other and do they have identical meaning?
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2answers
71 views

Which degree should be used? [closed]

Which degree of 'less' is correct in the following sentence - "Seats in this room are much less/lesser in comparison to the adjacent one." Also please state any general rule of English if it is being ...
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2answers
149 views

Placement of 'always'

Which of the following is the most appropriate usage "You have to be always logical in your analysis." "You always have to be logical in your analysis." "You have to be logical in your ...
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2answers
2k views

Difference between 'such as' and 'like'

This one never ceases to confuse me. When to use 'such as' and when to use 'like' while giving examples? Is there any clear rule? Metros like Mumbai, Delhi and Karachi are unsafe after dark. ...
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2answers
235 views

'solid' used as an adverb

The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th Edition contains the following (on the hyphenation or otherwise of compounds): 6.38: The trend in spelling compound words has been away from the use of hyphens; ...
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2answers
66 views

Usage of the word 'adroitly'

Is it correct to say that a barkeep was "adroitly pouring out drinks behind the bar"? Something rubs me the wrong way here. Perhaps it would be better to use some synonym in this context? If so, which ...
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1answer
3k views

Adverb placement: “There is still” vs. “there still is”

I believe the following sentences are grammatically correct and that perhaps the latter has an emphasizing effect on still in certain contexts. There is still some time left. There still is some ...
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3answers
5k views

How to use 'even so'?

We were staying at the most expensive hotel in town. But, even so, there were no toilet rolls in the washroom. I was struck by the use of 'even so' in the above sentence. Is it correct? Shouldn't it ...
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1answer
881 views

“Have you gone” vs. “have you ever gone”

When talking about past experience, what is the difference between these two sentences? Have you gone to Hong Kong? Have you ever gone to Hong Kong?
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3answers
175 views

“His words reached her nicely”

Someone told me I can't say, someone's words reached someone else nicely. For example: "His/your words reached me nicely" Is that true?
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2answers
468 views

Can the verb 'be' be modified?

Comments on this question, now closed, considered whether the verb be could be modified by an adverb. This seems a question worth pursuing in its own right, so may I ask what completely modifies in ...
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2answers
981 views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
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1answer
201 views

What does “mostly” modify? [closed]

"My friends are mostly non-smokers." Is "mostly" a focusing adverb that modifies "non-smokers"?
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3answers
282 views

Use of “approximately” [closed]

Is approximately used correctly in the following sentence? Our congregation is comprised of approximately sixty to eighty different ethnic and cultural groups.
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1answer
186 views

When and how did “pretty” enter English as an intensifying adverb?

Today I saw an idiomatic road sign: "Pretty Muddy". I found this lack of strict English on a road sign unusual (on par with my "Dead Slow" official speed limit sign in Leeds, pic below), but as it ...
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5answers
711 views

Orally or Verbally

Which is correct/better to state: He was orally informed OR He was verbally informed. What determines when it is suitable to use either, i.e. verbally or orally.
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10k views

“Totally agree” and “completely agree”

What is the difference between totally agree and completely agree? In other words, what is the difference in meaning between totally and completely in such combinations in conversations?
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2answers
508 views

position of “only”

Which sentence is correct? (A) Mosquito larvae can only be seen through a microscope. (B) Mosquito larvae can be only seen through a microscope. (C) Mosquito larvae can be seen only through ...
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114 views

who / how / where / what

There was a question on the test that I was not sure which option was correct. The question is "Fill in the blank choosing the most appropriate word." Duke is not ( ) we think him to be. who / ...
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3answers
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Why do many professional writers hate adverbs, and what should be used in their place?

In response to the death of Elmore Leonard the New York Times has posted a list of writing tips he composed back in 2001. Among them is the following: To use an adverb this way (or almost any way) ...
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516 views

Correct use of either in a conversation

In the following conversation: Person A: I don't like Bob Person B: No, he's annoying. Mind you I don't like Barry, either. It is my understanding that the use of the word "either" is appropriate. ...
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1answer
92 views

What does “apiece” modify?

The head of the American postal system recently lamented the fact that a first-class stamp costs only 46 cents: If you think about 30 billion pieces [of mail] at today’s rate of 46 cents apiece, ...
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248 views

Is there a rule about using the adverb “utterly” followed by negative adjectives?

I have noticed that most of the time it is the case in usage, but I'm not sure if it is a rule or not. I. e. would it be right to say "utterly wonderful" or does it sound oxymoronic? Thanks
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Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?

Since 'great' is an adjective, "I'm doing great" seems to be incorrect. It should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." You could say "I'm doing well." Could you also say "I'm doing greatly."?
2
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1answer
631 views

Inversion with “many times” at the beginning of a sentence

I am having a discussion with my friend. I said, "Many times I have seen him washing his car." He says it should be, "Many times have I seen him washing his car. Much like "Often do I see him", and ...
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2answers
323 views

Short sentence with adjective and adverb

I think that this is a problem of the usage of adjectives and adverbs (that's why I chose this title): I have a sentence in my presentation, which clarifies that a procedure uses only observations ...
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2answers
311 views

Positioning of adverb phrases [duplicate]

Here are three ways to say the same thing. I wonder if there are particular rules regarding to the position of adverb phrases: Then play those passages over and over again in your memory Or, ...
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1answer
2k views

Any difference between “Are you done?” and “Are you done yet?”

I see people in movies saying Are you done? and Are you done yet? And I wonder what that the addition of yet might mean or suggest in the second version which is absent in the first ...
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1answer
311 views

What's the correct adverb for predict? [closed]

I'm trying to figure out whether it is valid to say the size of ... is predictively determined some sources on the web include predictively as a valid adverb, some don't. And what about ...
4
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1answer
216 views

Always vs Every day

I have lunch at school every day vs I always have lunch at school. Why does the frequency adverb, always, go before the verb, have, whereas the expression, "every day" is placed at the end of ...