An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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An adverb challenge

I was set the challenge to provide one particular adverb that can be used as verb modifier, adjective modifier and adverb modifier, and an example of its use in each of the cases. In addition the ...
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Need a word for "Should not have happened' with a negative context

I'm looking for a word to mean "should not have happened." I'm trying to relate this situation; two paths - one positive, one negative - with the same end result, and the negative path was taken. ...
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Question on “Out of”

In "out of", is the "out" considered a preposition or an adverb?
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Translating Gerunds from Spanish to English (verb+ing)

In Spanish, the gerund form (-ando, -endo) is frequently used adverbially to modify and describe the verb: El alma es dichosa dando y sirviendo. El niño anda bailando. El artista vive provocando ...
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179 views

Use of an ~ing form with another verb

I'm not sure how to describe the use of the bolded words in the following cases: Pete is happy singing a song Anna talked screaming Mike entered the room screaming and laughing Is it ...
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684 views

Should I use a hyphen after -ly when modifying a verb in the past participle verb?

Which of these are acceptable? Is one preferable over the other? "Chemically-deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." "Chemically deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." Also, is the title to ...
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297 views

Is “like” used as an adjective by native speakers?

Do native speakers use like as an adjective? Is it a preferred usage?
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103 views

Avoiding Adverbs

I have been told to avoid adverbs at all costs. What is another way of rewriting: This feature is not easily extensible.
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45 views

“Almost” vs “near to”

Consider the phrase below: He produced almost no news reports this week. And this another one: He produced near to no news reports this week. Do "almost" and "near to" have the same ...
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We say entrepreneur and entrepreneurship, what is the verb?

For the word entrepreneur and entrepreneurship, I would like to know the corresponding verb, i.e the action of doing entrepreneurship, i.e the verb that should fit in the next sentence : To be a good ...
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798 views

What is the difference between the adjectives/adverbs “broad” and “wide”? the nouns “breadth” and “width”? [duplicate]

Broad and wide are near synonyms but only near, since "a broad smile" is a more common collocation than "a wide smile", and you can say "eyes wide open" but not "eyes broad open". Breadth and width ...
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185 views

'the cleanest' vs 'cleanest': article-containing adverb phrases?

We have two phrases structures: 'the nicest in my school' 'the cleanest in my house' These phrases can act as nouns or adverbs: 'He is the nicest in my school.' - noun phrase. 'She cleaned the ...
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231 views

Adverbial form for a common swear word

Is shittly a word (and if so, how many t’s does it have?) or do I have to use shittily?
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584 views

Shall I use 'thus' or 'thusly'? [duplicate]

Which is correct? ...others are compensated thus. ...others are compensated thusly. This page says 'thusly' is incorrect: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/thusly However without the 'ly' is ...
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What does 'infinitesimally small' mean?

If infinite is the opposite of infinitesimal, and small is the opposite of large, then: infinitely large ---------- Means "very large" infinitely small --------- Means "very small" infinitesimally ...
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3answers
412 views

Is “alone” an adverb in “I was sitting alone”?

Is the sentence "I was sitting alone." correct? And if so, is "alone" an adverb? Are there other examples of adjectives being used as adverbs without modification?
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Can adverbs also modify/specify the speaker's state of mind, emotion, character, etc. in English?

I don't think there are such adverbs in English that officially indicate the speaker's emotional/mental state, personality, etc. "Could you please let me join your group?" doesn't convey the ...
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2k views

Adverbs + Present Perfect

Here's my problem: I've been confused about the placement of adverbs in present/past perfect phrases. For example, which sentence would sound better: "We had been slowly drifting down the river ...
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What is the difference when we change the position of adverbs?

Would you possibly readily elaborate the reason why you do not say A book is there on the table. instead of There is a book on the table. ?
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How alive is the distinction between 'not any more' and 'not any longer'?

Does I don't love you any more. mean that my love dwindled till there was not any more of it left, focus(s)ing on the process, whereas I don't love you any longer. would mean that there ...
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2k views

Can you say “more quickly”? [duplicate]

Can you say "more quickly" in the context "I can move more quickly than she can."
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221 views

Verbs that change meaning depending on object position

I was writing a text and I stumbled upon the differences between: Lily slipped and threw up her keys Lily slipped and threw her keys up [in the air] For a moment I was finding phrase 1 more ...
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4answers
143 views

Quick or Quickly: “How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy” [duplicate]

Let’s say I have this title: How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy Should I say quick and easy or quickly and easily? Why?
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1answer
522 views

'in appreciation' vs. 'appreciatively' [closed]

Is using the adverbial prepositional phrase in appreciation in place of the adverb appreciatively convey exactly the same meaning? I'm attempting to avoid the use of the adverb "appreciatively" in ...
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What does “barely” imply?

When someone says, I barely understand that. Does he mean: He almost doesn't understand [which means he understands a bit] He almost understands [which means he doesn't understand] ...
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Is it more correct to say “You have not yet <actioned>” or “You have not <actioned> yet”?

Having seen Correct placing and usage of "yet", it sounds like it may be correct to say either "You have not created any items yet." or "You have not yet created any items." Is one more ...
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198 views

Which position does “really” and “quite” go?

I know really is an adverb, and one that intensifies the verb. I also know that some adverbs go only in the beginning; in the middle or at the end of a sentence, and some can be placed in all three ...
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I have been sick for the last week? [closed]

I' would like to know whether or not the following sentences are correct and why: I have been sick since last week. I have been sick since the last week. I have been sick for the last ...
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Why has the word “thrice” fallen out of common usage?

I'm an American living in America, but my workplace has a lot of immigrants from India here. They all use "thrice" very commonly, which is wonderful to my ears! Thrice is such a delightful word. ...
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Are hyphens needed in a noun-phrase that precedes 'manner'? [duplicate]

I sometimes use "manner" to use noun-phrases as adverbs, like "in the manner of a vigilant watchdog". If I reverse the order, does the noun phrase then have to be hypenated? Like so: "in a ...
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Part of speech and usage of “in person”

Is "in person" an adjective or adverb, describing the person or the action being done? The artist will be in person, painting. The artist will be painting in person. Which is correct?
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979 views

When to use wrong or wrongly as adverbs? [duplicate]

It seems that wrong is not only an adjective, but is also a proper adverb ("You're doing it wrong!", right?). There's, however, an adverb wrongly, which probably means the same thing. Talking about ...
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126 views

Why isn't “safely disposing” written as “safe disposing” instead?

The cost of safely disposing of the toxic chemicals is approximately five times what the company paid to purchase them. The -ing and of seem indicate that "disposing" is a noun, and since ...
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121 views

some time vs sometime

Is there a rule for "some time" vs "sometime"? For example: Don’t trust your memory to recall noteworthy situations and events some time (sometime) later.
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927 views

How do you modify an adverb with another adverb?

This is the case I have in mind. I wish to express that impact acted in a way that was severely adverse. It impacted her severely adversely. The proposed text above doesn't feel right at all, ...
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495 views

How does one decide whether an adverb of manner should precede or follow the verb?

How does one decide whether an adverb of manner should precede or follow the verb? In some cases, it seems to be more natural to have the adverb follow the verb, as in: “She moved slowly and spoke ...
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144 views

Adverb for a person who is not the subject

If I went home and was happy to do so, I can say that "I went home happily". If I sent somebody else home and he was happy to do so, can I say that "I sent Johnny home happily"? This doesn't sound ...
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The position of “always” in different sentences [closed]

I want to know about the position of always in different sentences. For example: Always she is tidy and on time. Is it correct or not?
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326 views

Positive and negative clause comparison in the same sentence

What is the right way to perform a positive and a negative adverb comparison in the beginning of the sentence? As an example, which of the following ways is correct: Similarly to yesterday, and ...
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2answers
73 views

Usage of 'bovinely' when fastness or slowness are involved

I know that in English 'I tried to go as slow as possible' and 'I tried to go as fast as possible' have a very different meaning, but I'm unsure how 'bovinely', before 'possible', change that ...
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“Down for” something vs. “Up for” something? [duplicate]

Is there any difference between someone saying they're "down for" something as opposed to being "up for" something? For example: I'm totally up for ice cream tonight! vs. I'm totally down ...
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Doubtless or doubtlessly?

To my surprise I found that doubtless is used as an adverb without appending the "-ly". Doubtless, some of you will know more examples. It feels wrong, but then again, I am not a native ...
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1answer
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I was wondering whether it is acceptable to put the adverb “rudely” in the following three places in this sentence

sentence: The man looked at me. 1 The man looked at me rudely. 2 The man rudely looked at me. 3 The man looked rudely at me.
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“Went to school happily” vs. “happily went to school” vs. “went happily to school” [duplicate]

The boy went to school happily. The boy happily went to school. The boy went happily to school. If the adverb “happily” is allowed to be put in the three places above, what are the ...
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229 views

What are the differences between “go to school happily”, “go happily to school” and “happily go to school”?

There are three similar phrases which I would like to know the differences between: go to school happily go happily to school happily go to school I have long been confused by the ...
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675 views

Inversion or no inversion after “only”?

Only now you can even get them on top of wrinkles. Only infrequently does it happen. As one of our members has said, inversion happens when a sentence starts with "only" and never ...
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309 views

A word meaning “To bring out of retirement” / “To bring back into use”

(Re)instate? -- Seems too specific. (Re-)employ? -- Seems to apply to both machines and people, which is useful. But re-employ seems too general. Activate? -- Seems most appropriate perhaps, although ...
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“put your coat on” and “put on your coat” but not “depend on someone” and “depend someone on*”

Why can you say "put on your coat" and "put your coat on" but not "depend on someone" and "depend someone on*"? Why are adverbs ("on" in the first sentence) mobile, whereas prepositions ("on" in the ...
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'but' for contrast and 'but' for opposition

'But' does not mean the same thing in "I like pop music but my parents like classical music." and in "My parents have played a lot of classical music to me but I still don't like it." What is it ...
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“distinguish them more completely” vs. “more completely distinguish them”

Is there a rule I could tell the difference between: Both A and B have other attributes that distinguish them more completely. Both A and B have other attributes that more completely ...