An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

4
votes
3answers
2k views

Clarifying the usage of “hella”

The word hella has spread from the Southern California dialect to the point where most varieties of American English speaker (such as me in the Midwest) know that it exists and hear it used. I always ...
1
vote
3answers
102 views

What word could I replace “importantly” with in this sentence?

I am looking for a synonym to the word "importantly" in this sentence (as well as other grammar tips because this sentence is messing with my brain): "Perhaps more importantly, I learned the ...
1
vote
2answers
203 views

Correct Usage of Nigh in a sentence

Currently, I am trying to come up with a poetic title involving Nigh, Night, Ghost and Quiet. However, I have struggled to figure out correctly where I can place Nigh in a sentence and be ...
6
votes
2answers
137 views

“I am extremely smarter than you.”

Is "I am extremely smarter than you." a grammatically OK sentence? It sounds awkward, but is there a grammatical issue? Please note that I am not asking if it could sound better, nor am I asking for ...
8
votes
3answers
3k views

“Hard” vs. “hardly”

I have always found the pronounced distinction in meaning between "studying hard" and "hardly studying" a bit amusing. What is the origin of the word hardly? How is it etymologically connected to ...
2
votes
3answers
391 views

What is the opposite of case-sensitive and does “case-insensitively” exist?

I thought it was "case-insensitive" but there are very few sources. If it's correct, what is it's adverb? As a non-native english speaker i would say it's "case-insensitively" but that sounds odd and ...
3
votes
2answers
229 views

Why adjective can be placed after “eat” as in “garlic can be eaten raw”?

Edit note: This question with some good answers does not explain (or ask) why it is an adjective that's used as opposed to an adverb in this type of construction: Is this an objective complement or ...
0
votes
2answers
73 views

“well” modifying an another adverb

Could you please give me a sentence where well (meaning good) modifies another adverb? Centrifugal force is a well-known principle of physics. (well modifying an adjective) She drives well. ...
4
votes
5answers
19k views

the difference between “really” and “very”

Is the statement below true about the difference between really and very when really means “very” in the example “It’s very/really hot in the summer”? “Really” shows more involvement, even ...
0
votes
1answer
388 views

Strong vs strongly

''We started strong...'' ''We started strongly...'' Which one is correct? I thought that ''started'' required an adverb, but I've recently heard someone say ''strong'' and now I have this conundrum. ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Use of “due to” after modal verbs [duplicate]

I understand the simple distinction between "due to" ("adjectival") and "because of" (adverbial), but I get a little confused when the sentence includes modal or complex verbs. For example, could one ...
0
votes
0answers
63 views

Adverb for a third of a year

Similar to Is there a proper term to describe 1/3 of a year (4 months) Are there any words to describe a trimester as an adverb? The only one I've seen is triannually (in the link above) which is a ...
0
votes
2answers
127 views

Does an adverb for “genre” exist?

I ran into a gap in my diction recently. Does an adverb for genre exist? I'm trying to say the following but with adverb form: The two songs differed by genre. However, this doesn't seem quite ...
-1
votes
1answer
47 views

How to identify an adverbial clause

I find it difficult to identify an adverbial clause in the following sentence: Saturday is the day when I get my hair done. Is the clause "when I get my hair done" adverbial?.
1
vote
0answers
164 views

Is “away” an adverb in “He ran away”. Also, is it an Object?

Is 'away' the object of the verb 'ran' in: I ran away ... or is it an adverb modifying the verb 'ran'? It seems to be obligatory, which may indicate that it's a phrasal verb as ODO has a ...
6
votes
1answer
16k views

Which one is correct “et al.’s” or “et al.”?

I want to use the possessive noun form with et al. as in et al.'s versus et al.
22
votes
6answers
3k views

Are the rules regarding absolute modifiers too absolute?

A common grammar lesson that was taught to me in the US and that I've had to teach abroad in EFL classrooms is that we're not to use adverbs of emphasis with absolute modifiers, just as we're not ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

use of “due to” or “becasue of” with modal verbs

I understand the simple distinction between "due to" ("adjectival") and "because of" (adverbial), but I get a little confused when the sentence includes modal or complex verbs. For example, could one ...
6
votes
6answers
11k views

Can an adverb be a noun at the same time?

In this sentence: Ben and Jen went home. Is home both an adverb and a noun?
4
votes
6answers
971 views

Which adverb implies supreme confidence, falling just shy of arrogance?

When he participated in debates and round table discussions, Christopher Hitchens spoke with supreme confidence. I'd like to replace with supreme confidence with an adverb that implies supreme ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

“so much…” or “such…” discrepancy

I have the sentence: "They begin to recognize why so much discrepancy and confusion persists within this subject " My question is: should it be "so much" or "such"? Would I need to do something ...
2
votes
1answer
492 views

Ending a sentence in the past tense with 'soon'

I was marking some exams for my Japanese high school students, and one of the test problems is: Arrange the following words into a sentence: walk / started / they / soon / to Without fail, all ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

How do you know if a derivative word is actually an English word? [duplicate]

For example, "recidivistic" can be found in Merriam-Webster as an adjective derivative of recidivist. How do I know if "recidivistically" is adverb form of "recidivistic"? It is not listed in ...
7
votes
2answers
223 views

When should we use an adjective instead of an adverb after verbs(main verb)?

Here's the SAT sentence that raised my curiosity: Strong wind, sweeping almost unchecked over great distances, is a prime component of the grassland climate. Although I know the sentence above ...
2
votes
3answers
8k views

Is “out” a preposition or an adverb in these sentences?

Is out a preposition or an adverb in these sentences? "We need to get the hell out of this place." "We need to get out and leave this place."
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Where to place 'only' relative to prepositions?

I know that questions about the placement of 'only', are often asked here; accordingly, I searched for an answer to my question before posting it. Question Where are focusing adverbs placed relative ...
6
votes
5answers
12k views

“Thus” vs. “Thusly”

I read an article that used "thusly" and was wondering if there is any grammatical credence to it. The quote: The issue started when Sokolowski quickly ran out of storage capacity in his 32GB ...
0
votes
2answers
21k views

Is “more quickly” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Can you use "more quickly" in the following context? I can move more quickly than she can.
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “more importantly” good English?

I was taught in school in the UK that it was either "more important" or "importantly," never "more importantly." We say "interestingly" or "more interesting," not "more interestingly". Is "more ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Subordinating Conjunctions and Conjunctive adverbs

Is there way to identify which words are Subordinating Conjunctions and which are Conjunctive adverbs, or do we need to memorize it? Both seems similar to me Subordinating Conjunctions: Although, ...
0
votes
2answers
102 views

Can “proper” be used proper as an adverb? [duplicate]

Which one is correct? I hope I thanked you proper! I hope I thanked you properly!
3
votes
3answers
4k views

Difference between 'such as' and 'like'

This one never ceases to confuse me. When to use 'such as' and when to use 'like' while giving examples? Is there any clear rule? Metros like Mumbai, Delhi and Karachi are unsafe after dark. ...
7
votes
3answers
7k views

What is meant by saying “X, not to say Y”?

When someone says "X, not to say Y", do they mean "X, but not Y" or do they mean "X, and even Y"? Normally I would assume it's the first, but I've seen a few examples where it seems ambiguous. Or ...
5
votes
5answers
314 views

Word that means “general preference to flee from/avoid commotion/attention”

Something that doesn't necessarily embody fear but cautiousness. Contextually, this could relate to social environments. A desire to remain in tranquil environments. A general preference of calm ...
0
votes
2answers
409 views

Is there an adjectival or adverbial form of “legacy”?

For example: This process orders entries in a <word-ic> way     (adjective) This process orders entries <word-ically>     (adverb) My first thought was ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

How does adverb placement affect the meaning of a sentence?

I want to correct the following sentence so that it is grammatically correct and still conveys the original meaning: Many alcoholics attempt to conceal their problem from their fellow workers, but ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

What to make of the following sentences that begin with why, when, where, or how? [duplicate]

Why you put yourself in this predicament is beyond me. When you leave for work is of your concern. Where we spend the night depends on the weather. How you finish the project is ...
0
votes
2answers
7k views

“Would rather [infinitive1] than [infinitive2]” vs. “would rather that [subjunctive]”"

I am aware of sentences like Beth would rather study at the library than go to parties. There is another type of using rather that: She would rather that the plane leave early in the ...
0
votes
0answers
76 views

Adverb of manner and participle in subjective participle construction

Why is an adverb of manner placed before participle in the sentence "We watched the temperature gradually rising"? I know that if the verb is transitive, then the adverb of manner can be placed ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

Looking for a non -ly word to use instead of certainly

I'm writing a seminar on a book as a school assignment, and I need a word to replace "certainly", as in "this is certainly true", because I want to avoid using words that end in -ly.
1
vote
0answers
35 views

What does bi-weekly mean? [duplicate]

I was confused while looking for the meaning of bi-weekly. Is it twice per week or once per two weeks?
6
votes
3answers
9k views

“Deliberately” vs. “intentionally” vs. “on purpose”

I wonder if there is any difference between usage of these three: deliberately intentionally on purpose Are they completely interchangeable? Are they at the same level of formality? I found some ...
27
votes
5answers
8k views
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Difference(s) between Especially and Specially [duplicate]

I have really hard time to figure out when to use Specially and when to use Especially. Since both are adverbs, that makes it even harder. Can anyone simply give a way to distinguish between these two ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

Are proper adverbs falling out of usage in current spoken American English?

While watching American movies and TV series, I notice that in dialogue very often the usage of a proper adverb is replaced by the corresponding adjective (in the case where the adverb is formed by ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

About the usage of an adverb “at all”

I found this phrase from a book I am reading now. "Tommy did not seem at all dejected." It sounded unnatural to me. And why not something like "Tommy did not seem dejected at all." I feel like more ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

“I have been keeping ignoring you.”

Does this make any sense? I have been keeping ignoring you. Besides that it sounds awkward, my Chinese buddy who knows more grammar rules than I care to list said that the phrase is ...
1
vote
2answers
544 views

A Question on Parallelism

Sample sentence: "With three days remaining in the term, Mitzy started doing research, creating an outline, and wrote a rough draft." In this case, is "doing" a verb in parallel with "creating" but ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

What “degrees” of consideration are there? [closed]

I am seriously considering taking English lessons Are there other degrees of consideration that are a little less serious?
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Very much? What?

In this sentence: The air force and navy were modernized but the army, very much the poor relation, was not. The "very much" used here seems to be different from the "very much" of "thank you ...