An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Is it ok to write “very huge” in this context? [duplicate]

I think it is ok to write "very huge" in a context like this (although "very" is a bit redundant here): This is a very huge map. However, the following sounds strange to me: This map is very ...
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We did it at exactly the right time vs We did it at the exactly right time.

I know the first example is correct and I'm pretty sure the second is incorrect, but I wonder why. So, we can say "I saw an extremely angry dog", but not "I saw extremely an angry dog." When do we ...
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80 views

Can I be “friendfully yours” [closed]

friendly (advs). : Used to mean 'in a friendly manner. I am wondering if "friendfully" was/is in standard usage and would I sound primitive or ungrammatical if I dare write "friendfully yours" ...
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Even though + Adverb usage

I'm not sure if these sample sentences below are grammatically incorrect, but they sound very odd to me. I couldn't see the man even though actually he was there. He still got hit even though ...
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“Thus” vs. “Thusly”

I read an article that used "thusly" and was wondering if there is any grammatical credence to it. The quote: The issue started when Sokolowski quickly ran out of storage capacity in his 32GB ...
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What exactly does “already” mean when used in the imperative mood?

This is a question about American English usage of the word "already". As a UK resident I don't completely understand when I hear Americans give commands like "Stop it already!" In the UK the word ...
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2answers
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Is “oftener” obsolete?

Does any native speaker of the English Language ever use oftener instead of more often?
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5answers
4k views

Why is “fastly” not a word?

As well as being an adjective, fast is an adverb. We use it all the time as such: He ran fast. However, though slow is definitely an adjective, it sounds wrong when used as an adverb, because ...
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6answers
785 views

Which adverb implies supreme confidence, falling just shy of arrogance?

When he participated in debates and round table discussions, Christopher Hitchens spoke with supreme confidence. I'd like to replace with supreme confidence with an adverb that implies supreme ...
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Explanation of “must needs”

Recently I ran across the sentence: "Just why the law prescribed thirty-nine lashes instead of forty or forty-one and so on, must needs remain unanswered." How did a plural verb like "needs" ...
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4answers
8k views

“Adverbial phrase” vs “Adverbial clause”

Please tell me what the difference is between an adverbial phrase and an adverbial clause.
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can someone tell me if i am right in identifying the odd word out from these group of words? [closed]

a) taken WENT seen forgotten--- because the rest are verbs b) bright EARLY good some------because the rest are adjectives ??? c) NEVER but unless ...
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3answers
135 views

What's the correct usage of “agree some days” vs. “agree on some days”?

"However, workers and employers can agree longer holidays". I have searched online. I also referred to two reference books : the blue book of grammar and grammar rules. I don't see a usage as of ...
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What does “enough” mean in expressions like “Fair enough” or “Funny enough”?

As a non-native speaker, I already get used to the word enough in expressions like those below, but I sometimes still got confused of it. It makes me wonder what it actually means and where does it ...
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3answers
145 views

“completely” usage confusion

As I know, verbs are followed by adverbs. So, which is true? "She stands there completely expressionlessly" Or "she stands there completely expressionless" Though I think the second one is likely to ...
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5answers
116 views

Ambiguity with adverbs when using the word “or”

If you take the sentence "Bob will run or walk fast." how is the ambiguity resolved between the following two meanings? Bob will either run fast or he will walk fast. Bob will either ...
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1answer
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Is 'unassumingly' a real word? [closed]

So I'm trying to say 'in a way that doesn't draw attention from others'. Is 'unassumingly' right word for that or what kind of adverb should I use? Thanks in advance.
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8answers
621 views

“Almost until 1900” or “until almost 1900”: which one is correct?

Although various eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American poets had professed an interest in Native American poetry and had pretended to imitate Native American forms in their own works, it was ...
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1answer
314 views

The variations of in/for the last few days

1.I was not able to gain access to Internet in last a few days. 2.I was not able to gain access to Internet last a few days. 3.I was not able to gain access to Internet in a few days. ...
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2answers
37k views

“Yet” at the beginning of a sentence

Can one use "Yet" at the beginning of a sentence as follows? Yet, he came late. Is this grammatical?
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4answers
1k views

Why is “well” used with linking verbs instead of “good”? [duplicate]

As any grammar handbook, English teacher, or parent correcting a child will tell you, you're supposed to say "I don't feel well" instead of "I don't feel good." Well rather than good seems to be used ...
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188 views
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139 views

“Turn slightly right” or “Turn slight right”

This is a grammatical question. For a route navigation, which expression is better to say? "slight" is adjective and "slightly" is adverb, so I guess "Turn slightly right" would be the correct in ...
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1answer
100 views

True meaning of these 'adverbials'

Recently I had a discussion with someone and the following examples were brought up. I was told that I was wrong, but as a native speaker I don't think any of my explanations of the meaning were ...
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Identifying verb types, nouns, adjectives and adverbs in a sentence - 5th grade

While helping my son, who happens to be in the 5th grade, with his English grammar, I have realized that I am confused. The following sentence, that I gave him as an exercise, he has identified the ...
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2answers
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Do 'already' and 'just' require the present perfect?

Compare: 'We already/just gave him a response'. 'We have already/just given him a response'. Do 'already' and 'just' strictly require the present perfect?
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Grammatical role of “the hell”?

I’m wondering exactly which grammatical role the word hell takes on in expressions such as Get the hell out of here the hell in this case seems to modify the phrasal verb to get out (get out ...
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How did the adjective “just” come to take on so many adverbial meanings?

Just is a pretty useful adverb. It can carry several different meanings: very recently: I just finished the novel. exactly: That’s just what he meant. by a narrow margin: He just missed me ...
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Usage of adverbs like reasonably, practically, essentially, ridiculously, basically

I have recently noticed a phenomenon in English, that seems quite common. The phenomenon is regarding the usage of certain adverbs: Practically should mean in a practical manner. But it is often ...
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2answers
110 views

Can “very” (and its synonyms") mean less intense? [closed]

I recently found something mildly intriguing. Very should mean more than the following adjective. This room is dark Means that it is casually dark if you will. While This room is very dark ...
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132 views

Is there an adverb meaning “now, but not in the past”?

“Still” means “in the past and now”: “It is still raining.” Is there an English adverb meaning “now, but not in the past”?
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1answer
181 views

Can 'to' in 'to + verb' be an adverb?

The 'to infinitive' has the structure to + verb as in to go, to eat, to ride, etc. The word 'to' is thought to be a preposition. However, since a preposition needs an object and a verb cannot be an ...
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2answers
201 views

Using adjectives after verbs?

In a lot of sentences when speaking people use adjectives after verbs. In some examples it sounds right, however, and I was wondering if such uses were valid in formal writing. The only example I ...
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3answers
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Is majoritively a word?

So I was writing a sentence and the word majoritively popped into my head as a "Hey, why not? Sounds good!" type of word. My sentence was to the effect of: Our GridViews majoritively use classic ...
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Comparative adverbs

"Officially" (or so I believe) English doesn't have comparative adverbs (a single word rather than "more" + an adverb), but faster is in common usage as one, for example: Do it faster When ...
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Using short adjectives as adverbs, such as “easy” & “short”

I know that some adjectives (such as easy & short) can be used as adverbs in some situations, but when can this happen and what adjectives does this apply to? This definitely works: "He stopped ...
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4answers
270 views

Quick or Quickly: “How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy” [duplicate]

Let’s say I have this title: How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy Should I say quick and easy or quickly and easily? Why?
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776 views

As quick as we can?

Is it acceptable to say "We'll get back to you as quick as we can"? Is "quick" a flat adverb in this case?
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2answers
367 views

'solid' used as an adverb

The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th Edition contains the following (on the hyphenation or otherwise of compounds): 6.38: The trend in spelling compound words has been away from the use of hyphens; ...
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1answer
436 views

Is “Tomorrow, I will buy it” correct? [closed]

My brother and I are having a discussion, whether it is grammatically correct (or any native speaker would ever say a sentence): Tomorrow, I will buy it. I think it is not correct, it strikes me ...
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3answers
165 views

“This is particularly since…”

Recently I came across this sentence: [... allegations that such information had been used elsewhere] This is particularly since you were given access to the information. I have been trying to ...
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1answer
59 views

Meaning of snobbishly [closed]

I'm reading The Great Gatsby and on the second page it says: As my father snobbishly suggested, and I snobbishly repeat a sense of the fundamental decencies is parcelled out unequally at birth. ...
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350 views

What is the difference between these “distancing expressions”?

There are a number of words that mean "generally believed to be true but not necessarily true" but their connotations differ tremendously. Some examples of these are allegedly putatively ...
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1answer
107 views

To Witness Something of Such Beauty

There is a word used in English but from Italian (I think) which has the following meaning: To witness something or someone of such profound beauty that you are compelled to sing aloud in ...
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2answers
125 views

Replacement for “narrowly missed?”

I am trying to remove adverbs from my writing. My grant proposal narrowly missed the funding threshold. I want to replace the phrase "narrowly missed" or change the whole sentence but still ...
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3answers
5k views

“Now I am” vs. “I am now”

Which is more correct? Now I am the main stakeholder... or I am now the main stakeholder... Do the intonations imply different meanings?
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63 views

Capital letter after adverb [closed]

In sentences like: Also, it provides ... Also, It provides ... is it allowed to place It (with a capital I) instead of it after the adverb Also?
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271 views

“When we X, we can then” vs. “we then can”

Consider these two sentences: When we go home, we can then watch a DVD When we go home, then we can watch a DVD Both mean the exact same thing, but do they differ in linguistic terms?
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832 views

What is the correct usage of the word “Contra”?

According to multiple sources (1 and 2), the word "contra" can be employed as either a preposition or an adverb. From my perspective, however, there is a dearth of clear examples featuring this word ...