An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Usage of “else” to convey the opposite meaning

I am writing an email to a senior and want to say if he agrees to my suggested changes and if no I will modify it further. So is this ok to say: Kindly suggest if you agree to this revised ...
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101 views

Collocation 'bolt upright'

What part of speech is the word 'bolt' in the adverb 'bolt upright'?
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5answers
188 views

What is the correct word for 'worrylessly'?

What would be the appropriate word for worrylessly in this following context "I shall prefer him for this task. And [worrylessly] expect an amazing result.
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6answers
169 views

One-word adverb meaning 'with difficulty', 'not easily'?

Is there a one-word adverb meaning 'with difficulty', 'not easily'? I am working on a grid for assessing pronunciation in speaking (correct sounds, correct intonations) and want to have a scale on ...
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3answers
2k views

Why is it “to take someone seriously” and not “to take someone serious”?

Obviously the difference between these two sentences is that one is using an adverb while the other one is using an adjective. The reason why I think that an adjective should be used, is that the ...
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741 views

Is there a difference between “Who necessarily do not exist” or “who do not exist necessarily”?

This is from the English version of the book "The Name of the Rose" by Umberto Eco. Brother William was arguing that the non-Christian people should also be given the right to rule. Here are some ...
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60 views

'Just now': past, future or both?

I only use it speaking of something that has just been done, i.e. in the very near past. I've finished washing the dishes just now. Can it be used also speaking of something that is about to be ...
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4answers
145 views

Word for “complementing each other, while showing an increase in intensity”

I have 2 sentences. The sentences are: In college, I wrote a simple calendar program. Concurrently, 2 years on, I am working on developing a complex universal calendar system. Here, I want "...
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60 views

Word for doing something but not wanting other people to notice? [closed]

It's not secretly. For example, I'm at a mall with a friend, then I notice someone from my school. I point to them to show my friend, who I go to school with. But I don't want the other person to ...
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1answer
137 views

Adverb to show both surprise and fear

I need an adverb to show both surprise and fear. Can we use shockingly or worriedly? For example, He asked shockingly.
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2answers
38 views

Why are both blazing or blazingly appropriate?

This SE QA explains that both blazing and blazingly are valid English words (despite what my spell-checker claims). Can anyone explain why they are both valid, and the difference between the words. ...
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4answers
497 views

What meaning is “legitimate(ly)” gaining?

I'm familiar with the following meanings of legitimately In a way that conforms to the law or to rules and In a way that can be defended with logic or justification; fairly (both from ODO)...
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1answer
72 views

What part of speech is “alight” in “set alight”?

In the clause it was set alight, is alight acting as adverb and modifying was set an adjective and modifying it; or something else entirely that I'm missing. I'm fairly certain that set ...
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123 views

Why does “eastwardly” have two opposite meanings?

"Eastwardly" can mean either from the east or to the east. How does one use it without ambiguity?
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0answers
40 views

When to use “-ly” (scientific language)

I'm wondering about what is the correct wording and in particular, which grammar rules are underlying your decision. Some loci are expressed independent of the environment. Some loci are expressed ...
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1answer
166 views

Using affordably as an adverb

I wish to write: The product cost is affordably accessible to all consumer types. I mean to say: The product cost is so affordable, any type of consumer can afford it. Can I use "...
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2answers
59 views

Difference between “weird content” and “weirdly content” [closed]

What's the difference between weird content and weirdly content?
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1answer
86 views

Why “Here COMES the bus!” but “Here he COMES!”? [duplicate]

What is the difference between: Here he comes! and Here comes the bus! Why in the first sentence "comes" is placed after the subject "he", but in 2nd one before the subject "the bus"?
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2answers
85 views

Use of preposition and prepositional adverb

I know that prepositions are not supposed to end a sentence; however, I have also read that some prepositions function as adverbs, as seen in "come inside" and "run around." My question concerns an ...
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2answers
121 views

“Each” in potential subject position in compound sentence always pronoun?

This question is related to: "Each" — pronoun or adverb The sentence in that question is: M and W are letters and each has 4 strokes In that sentence, how do we know that “each” is a ...
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1answer
41 views

Starting a sentence with “and”-connected adverbs or adverbials

I want compare one thing with two other things, discussing their differences as follows. Balls are better than dice, since they provide better rollability. Moreover and in contrast to eggs, ...
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895 views

Is “now” a “preposition”?

My question starts from this question which asks about difference between currently and right now, which is not that complicated. However, in the middle of exchanging comments, I found a few points ...
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1answer
52 views

Why is an interrogative pronoun not an adverb?

Consider these two sentences. A. Which museum did you visit? B. Which did you visit? In the first case the word "which" functions as an adjective modifying museum and in the second an interrogative ...
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3answers
102 views

Grammar: the function of “so” after conjunction?

Recently I read this sentence, and I am wondering, what is the function of "so" here? XYZ is the top provider of high-speed Internet services in the country, or so it claims in its ...
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4answers
27 views

A Conjunctive Adverb for Reverse

I'm looking for a simplistic manner to say To reverse a little, ... or To go back to an earlier statement, ... A single word conjunctive adverb would be best, similar to furthermore or ...
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3answers
66 views

Is the word “do” an adverb or helping verb

In the sentence "Small children certainly do need careful supervising." Is the word "do" an adverb modifying "need" or is it a helping verb to the main verb "need"? I'm grading papers and a student ...
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2answers
61 views

Is “not actual” in “potential, not actual harm” an adjective phrase or an adverbial phrase?

I think this affects comma placement, right? If it's an adjective phrase modifying harm, then I think it would be: "potential, not actual harm" If it's an adverb phrase modifying potential (by ...
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30 views

“Both win in this case, the students […] and science…” is the sentence incorrect?

I am unsure regarding this usage of 'both'. A friend of mine told me it is not correct. Both win in this case, the students who learned a new technique and science with more replications. Could ...
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187 views

Concluding vs Concludingly

My English teacher has taught me to use "Concluding" when writing the end part of certain texts (next to other words).Example: Concluding, we can say that... To me it somehow sounds curious. "...
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3answers
143 views

Definite article with the superlative degree of adverbs

Our rotary telephone is the least frequently used device in our house. Ben moved most quietly as the boys walked down the darkened ally. In the first sentence a superlative adverb is used with ...
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1answer
59 views

adverbial markers

1) "Even in those days he played golf every wednesday.".., in this sentence there are two adverbial markers(in those days and every wednesday) so which marker is considered as reference time and ...
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1answer
87 views

non-progressive, habitual actions

What is the difference between the following sentences? Even in those days he played golf on Wednesday. Even in those days he played golf on every Wednesday. Even in those days he played ...
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1answer
84 views

Words and phrases to express approximations

I would like to know the distinctions between these following words and phrases when they express approximations. I will be there in about an hour. I will be there in around an hour. I will be ...
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2answers
294 views

Should I use “support of” or “support to” in this sentence?

"Heavy construction will furnish direct support [to/of] the company's real estate operations." Would "to" or "of" be proper?
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2answers
63 views

Placing of adverb in a sentence

"This should perfectly be done". "This should be perfectly done". Of the two sentences, which one is correct? I am confused about placing of adverb "perfectly". Should the adverb be placed before "be"...
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195 views

“None but the brave deserves the fair.” What part of speech is “but”?

In the sentence: None but the brave deserves the fair. ...is the word but here a: pronoun adverb preposition conjunction Normally but is used as conjunction, but here I am not sure if this "...
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3answers
274 views

“quickly walk” or “walk quickly” [duplicate]

Is it "walk quickly" or "quickly walk?" What is the correct way to phrase the sentence: Please walk quickly. Please quickly walk. Thank you.
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2answers
155 views

Is there a suffix to form a noun from an adverb?

I want to know if we have a suffix which can be added to an adverb to form a noun. I have searched about that and I could not find anything about it.
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9answers
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How did “run over him” evolve to “run him over” over the last 50 years?

Growing up in Alabama, I never heard anyone bastardize the phrase "run over him (with the car)" to "run him over (with the car)", not even on TV or movies. I first noticed the change as I began to ...
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2answers
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Explaining “despite” as a preposition

My question is provoked by a desire to better explain to my students grammatical conventions regarding "despite." I am finding that my own explanatory resources come up short in this regard. ...
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1answer
47 views

'Really!' Is it still an adverb?

I understand that 'really' is an adverb when it is describing an adjective in a sentence but what if it was an exclamation as in 'Really! I had no idea that was the case.' What part of speech would it ...
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1answer
30 views

“currently running survey” or “currently-running survey”?

I still struggle to understand exactly when to use hyphens when adverbs are involved. Which of the following is correct? ABC is an acronym representing the actual name of the survey. "I use results ...
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1answer
45 views

Increase the font size by 2 pixel or Increase the font size to 2 pixel?

Increase the font size by 2 pixel or Increase the font size to 2 pixel? Which one is correct, please let me know
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2answers
104 views

Where should the adverb “soon” be positioned?

It says that the position of adverbs should come before the verb and the example they give is: We will soon have a break. In this example, is it not acceptable to have the adverb after the verb: ...
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1answer
56 views

Organizational term meaning “order appearing in a book” as contrasted to chronological

Is there a word that means "in the order something appears in a book or document" as opposed to chronological meaning "the order something occurs in time." Ignoring the fact that my examples may not ...
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1answer
152 views

Adjectives used as adverbs/ verbs used as adjectives/ verbs used as adverbs

First question: I have been reading English: An Essential Grammar by Gerald Nelson and it gives an example of the words 'hard' and 'fast' being used as both adjectives and adverbs: Adverb: John ...
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What word could I replace “importantly” with in this sentence?

I am looking for a synonym to the word "importantly" in this sentence (as well as other grammar tips because this sentence is messing with my brain): "Perhaps more importantly, I learned the ...
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2answers
255 views

Correct Usage of Nigh in a sentence

Currently, I am trying to come up with a poetic title involving Nigh, Night, Ghost and Quiet. However, I have struggled to figure out correctly where I can place Nigh in a sentence and be ...
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4answers
108 views

“hope…to win the approval” - help identify parts of speech

I'm confused by this sentence: "Lakesha hopes to win the approval of her mother by switching her major from fine arts to med." I think that in this case hope is intransitive, and I think the ...
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149 views

“I am extremely smarter than you.”

Is "I am extremely smarter than you." a grammatically OK sentence? It sounds awkward, but is there a grammatical issue? Please note that I am not asking if it could sound better, nor am I asking for ...