An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Why is an interrogative pronoun not an adverb?

Consider these two sentences. A. Which museum did you visit? B. Which did you visit? In the first case the word "which" functions as an adjective modifying museum and in the second an interrogative ...
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Grammar: the function of “so” after conjunction?

Recently I read this sentence, and I am wondering, what is the function of "so" here? XYZ is the top provider of high-speed Internet services in the country, or so it claims in its ...
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A Conjunctive Adverb for Reverse

I'm looking for a simplistic manner to say To reverse a little, ... or To go back to an earlier statement, ... A single word conjunctive adverb would be best, similar to furthermore or ...
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Is the word “do” an adverb or helping verb

In the sentence "Small children certainly do need careful supervising." Is the word "do" an adverb modifying "need" or is it a helping verb to the main verb "need"? I'm grading papers and a student ...
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Is “not actual” in “potential, not actual harm” an adjective phrase or an adverbial phrase?

I think this affects comma placement, right? If it's an adjective phrase modifying harm, then I think it would be: "potential, not actual harm" If it's an adverb phrase modifying potential (by ...
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“Both win in this case, the students […] and science…” is the sentence incorrect?

I am unsure regarding this usage of 'both'. A friend of mine told me it is not correct. Both win in this case, the students who learned a new technique and science with more replications. Could ...
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Concluding vs Concludingly

My English teacher has taught me to use "Concluding" when writing the end part of certain texts (next to other words).Example: Concluding, we can say that... To me it somehow sounds curious. "...
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Definite article with the superlative degree of adverbs

Our rotary telephone is the least frequently used device in our house. Ben moved most quietly as the boys walked down the darkened ally. In the first sentence a superlative adverb is used with ...
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adverbial markers

1) "Even in those days he played golf every wednesday.".., in this sentence there are two adverbial markers(in those days and every wednesday) so which marker is considered as reference time and ...
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non-progressive, habitual actions

What is the difference between the following sentences? Even in those days he played golf on Wednesday. Even in those days he played golf on every Wednesday. Even in those days he played ...
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Words and phrases to express approximations

I would like to know the distinctions between these following words and phrases when they express approximations. I will be there in about an hour. I will be there in around an hour. I will be ...
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Should I use “support of” or “support to” in this sentence?

"Heavy construction will furnish direct support [to/of] the company's real estate operations." Would "to" or "of" be proper?
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Placing of adverb in a sentence

"This should perfectly be done". "This should be perfectly done". Of the two sentences, which one is correct? I am confused about placing of adverb "perfectly". Should the adverb be placed before "be"...
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“None but the brave deserves the fair.” What part of speech is “but”?

In the sentence: None but the brave deserves the fair. ...is the word but here a: pronoun adverb preposition conjunction Normally but is used as conjunction, but here I am not sure if this "...
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“quickly walk” or “walk quickly” [duplicate]

Is it "walk quickly" or "quickly walk?" What is the correct way to phrase the sentence: Please walk quickly. Please quickly walk. Thank you.
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Is there a suffix to form a noun from an adverb?

I want to know if we have a suffix which can be added to an adverb to form a noun. I have searched about that and I could not find anything about it.
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How did “run over him” evolve to “run him over” over the last 50 years?

Growing up in Alabama, I never heard anyone bastardize the phrase "run over him (with the car)" to "run him over (with the car)", not even on TV or movies. I first noticed the change as I began to ...
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Explaining “despite” as a preposition

My question is provoked by a desire to better explain to my students grammatical conventions regarding "despite." I am finding that my own explanatory resources come up short in this regard. ...
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'Really!' Is it still an adverb?

I understand that 'really' is an adverb when it is describing an adjective in a sentence but what if it was an exclamation as in 'Really! I had no idea that was the case.' What part of speech would it ...
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“currently running survey” or “currently-running survey”?

I still struggle to understand exactly when to use hyphens when adverbs are involved. Which of the following is correct? ABC is an acronym representing the actual name of the survey. "I use results ...
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Increase the font size by 2 pixel or Increase the font size to 2 pixel?

Increase the font size by 2 pixel or Increase the font size to 2 pixel? Which one is correct, please let me know
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Where should the adverb “soon” be positioned?

It says that the position of adverbs should come before the verb and the example they give is: We will soon have a break. In this example, is it not acceptable to have the adverb after the verb: ...
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Organizational term meaning “order appearing in a book” as contrasted to chronological

Is there a word that means "in the order something appears in a book or document" as opposed to chronological meaning "the order something occurs in time." Ignoring the fact that my examples may not ...
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Adjectives used as adverbs/ verbs used as adjectives/ verbs used as adverbs

First question: I have been reading English: An Essential Grammar by Gerald Nelson and it gives an example of the words 'hard' and 'fast' being used as both adjectives and adverbs: Adverb: John ...
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What word could I replace “importantly” with in this sentence?

I am looking for a synonym to the word "importantly" in this sentence (as well as other grammar tips because this sentence is messing with my brain): "Perhaps more importantly, I learned the ...
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243 views

Correct Usage of Nigh in a sentence

Currently, I am trying to come up with a poetic title involving Nigh, Night, Ghost and Quiet. However, I have struggled to figure out correctly where I can place Nigh in a sentence and be ...
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“hope…to win the approval” - help identify parts of speech

I'm confused by this sentence: "Lakesha hopes to win the approval of her mother by switching her major from fine arts to med." I think that in this case hope is intransitive, and I think the ...
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“I am extremely smarter than you.”

Is "I am extremely smarter than you." a grammatically OK sentence? It sounds awkward, but is there a grammatical issue? Please note that I am not asking if it could sound better, nor am I asking for ...
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What is the opposite of case-sensitive and does “case-insensitively” exist?

I thought it was "case-insensitive" but there are very few sources. If it's correct, what is it's adverb? As a non-native english speaker i would say it's "case-insensitively" but that sounds odd and ...
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“well” modifying an another adverb

Could you please give me a sentence where well (meaning good) modifies another adverb? Centrifugal force is a well-known principle of physics. (well modifying an adjective) She drives well. (...
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Why adjective can be placed after “eat” as in “garlic can be eaten raw”?

Edit note: This question with some good answers does not explain (or ask) why it is an adjective that's used as opposed to an adverb in this type of construction: Is this an objective complement or ...
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538 views

Strong vs strongly

''We started strong...'' ''We started strongly...'' Which one is correct? I thought that ''started'' required an adverb, but I've recently heard someone say ''strong'' and now I have this conundrum.
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Adverb for a third of a year

Similar to Is there a proper term to describe 1/3 of a year (4 months) Are there any words to describe a trimester as an adverb? The only one I've seen is triannually (in the link above) which is a ...
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How to identify an adverbial clause

I find it difficult to identify an adverbial clause in the following sentence: Saturday is the day when I get my hair done. Is the clause "when I get my hair done" adverbial?.
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Use of “due to” after modal verbs [duplicate]

I understand the simple distinction between "due to" ("adjectival") and "because of" (adverbial), but I get a little confused when the sentence includes modal or complex verbs. For example, could one ...
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Does an adverb for “genre” exist?

I ran into a gap in my diction recently. Does an adverb for genre exist? I'm trying to say the following but with adverb form: The two songs differed by genre. However, this doesn't seem quite ...
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Is “away” an adverb in “He ran away”. Also, is it an Object?

Is 'away' the object of the verb 'ran' in: I ran away ... or is it an adverb modifying the verb 'ran'? It seems to be obligatory, which may indicate that it's a phrasal verb as ODO has a ...
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51 views

use of “due to” or “becasue of” with modal verbs

I understand the simple distinction between "due to" ("adjectival") and "because of" (adverbial), but I get a little confused when the sentence includes modal or complex verbs. For example, could one ...
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Helping-adverbs vs. Helping-adjectives vs. Adverbs of degree

I've recently come across the terms helping-adverb and helping-adjective in some old grammar books. From the book A practical grammar of the English language (by Roscoe Goddard Greene, 1830): A ...
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Ending a sentence in the past tense with 'soon'

I was marking some exams for my Japanese high school students, and one of the test problems is: Arrange the following words into a sentence: walk / started / they / soon / to Without fail, all ~...
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When should we use an adjective instead of an adverb after verbs(main verb)?

Here's the SAT sentence that raised my curiosity: Strong wind, sweeping almost unchecked over great distances, is a prime component of the grassland climate. Although I know the sentence above ...
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Using multiple adverbs for the same verb

Is is appropriate to use multiple adverbs in a row, such as in: This car is powered fully electrically. For my understanding both adjectives full and electric do refer to the verb "to power" and ...
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“so much…” or “such…” discrepancy

I have the sentence: "They begin to recognize why so much discrepancy and confusion persists within this subject " My question is: should it be "so much" or "such"? Would I need to do something ...
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Subordinating Conjunctions and Conjunctive adverbs

Is there way to identify which words are Subordinating Conjunctions and which are Conjunctive adverbs, or do we need to memorize it? Both seems similar to me Subordinating Conjunctions: Although, ...
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Word that means “general preference to flee from/avoid commotion/attention”

Something that doesn't necessarily embody fear but cautiousness. Contextually, this could relate to social environments. A desire to remain in tranquil environments. A general preference of calm ...
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What are the adverb and adjective for “content”?

Well, as it is said in the title of my question, I'm wondering what the adjective and adverb of content are. Similarly, we have context whose adjective and adverb are contextual and contextually ...
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“I can't well start a day” vs. “I can't start a day well”

I can't well start a day not running at least a few kilometres. I can't start a day well not running at least a few kilometres.
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Is there an adjectival or adverbial form of “legacy”?

For example: This process orders entries in a <word-ic> way     (adjective) This process orders entries <word-ically>     (adverb) My first thought was ...
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How does adverb placement affect the meaning of a sentence?

I want to correct the following sentence so that it is grammatically correct and still conveys the original meaning: Many alcoholics attempt to conceal their problem from their fellow workers, but ...
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What to make of the following sentences that begin with why, when, where, or how? [duplicate]

Why you put yourself in this predicament is beyond me. When you leave for work is of your concern. Where we spend the night depends on the weather. How you finish the project is unimportant. ...