An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Rules governing “quite a [adjective]” word order

As part of an answer on another StackExchange site, I have a sentence reading, in part, "[A religious manual] which has quite a long section on [the subject of the question] says ..." I was looking ...
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3answers
74 views

Mandatory to NOT something [closed]

I'm looking for some type of inverse of "mandatory to not", as in "mandatory to not have any errors in your exam" or "mandatory to not read foreign words in the book." (Those must sound awful to a ...
2
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2answers
821 views

“Follow close behind” vs “follow closely behind”?

I just came across something I'd written a while ago that contained the phrase "follows close behind", and my first thought was that it was incorrect and should be "follows closely behind", i.e. to ...
2
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2answers
103 views

Can “here” be an adjective? [duplicate]

This book here is the one I was talking about. My brother here just bought a new car. The two examples above have here following a noun. Most dictionaries say "here" is an adverb. I am ...
2
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1answer
150 views

Is “anecdotally” a proper adverb?

And if yes, is it common or rather odd? Example sentence: Anecdotally, we do see instances of customers buying both our products at the same store. The Chrome spellchecker doesn't seem to ...
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1answer
110 views

Using 'certainly' at the end of a sentence — what is the correct punctuation and what is the construction called?

Consider this construction: Certainly, I will see you tomorrow. The word 'certainly' constitutes an introductory phrase, and the appropriate punctuation to use is a comma. (AFAIK). Now, ...
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1answer
53 views

Usage of the word “Doggedly”

At the end of chapter 16 of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, the author states: After that day, a day rarely passed without her drawing the hammer on her slate, and without Orlick's ...
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3answers
31 views

Ways to perceive something: textually, visually, acoustically? [duplicate]

Textual describes something as being in text form. I can read something that is textual. Something that is visual can be viewed. I can listen to something that is acoustical in nature? I don't think ...
3
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1answer
513 views

Is this Adverbial a complement or an adjunct?

According to Wiki, Adverbials are typically divided into four classes: adverbial complements (i.e. obligatory adverbial) are adverbials that render a sentence ungrammatical and meaningless if ...
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1answer
420 views

Degrees of comparison for words ending in “-ly”

Would you make a word ending in -ly positive, comparative, or superlative? I'm sort of leaning towards positive at the moment, and if the answer is positive, would you put more and most for ...
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1answer
726 views

the difference between “no”, “not” and “none”? [closed]

How do we differentiate the use of "no", "not" and "none" ? I do not have a chair I do no have a chair I have no a chair I have none a chair
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3answers
64 views

“force kill” vs “forcibly kill”

To my knowledge, force can be used as a noun or verb, but cannot be used as an adverb. However, google tells me: there are over 72,000 results for "force kill a process" while, there are only 9200 ...
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3answers
247 views

Why do we say “so much more” rather than “so more ”? Why do we have to put the much in?

If the definition of the word so is an extent, then why do we have to put another word that describes a quantity after it, as "so much more" or "so much better"? Why can't we just say, so more or so ...
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1answer
94 views

Will I love you forever? or Will I love you for ever?

http://youtu.be/cgNMSJTevAk?t=2m10s This test states that the correct answer is: "Will I love you for ever?" There are numerous songs\articles on the internet that say that "forever" is the right ...
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2answers
134 views

Conjugations of Ancillary

Ancillary is already something of an uncommon word in conversation, but it came up recently in a StackOverflow chat room in the following example: Person 1: "Are you talking about me?" Person 2: ...
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2answers
56 views

Difference between “hop the rocks quickly” and “quickly hop the rocks”

I'm trying to decide which sentence is correct, or if they both are. which would you recommend as easier to read/understand for the average reader? Hop the rocks quickly and get the star. ...
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2answers
110 views

Compound adverb — “kick-start a party soccer style”

I have asked this question in ELL site, but there were not much reply, and so I decided to ask the same question here. Though I will change the question a little bit to exactly what I need more and to ...
2
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1answer
101 views

Using “respectively” with “and” vs. “or”

Is it acceptable usage to use "or" with "respectively", or is it possible only with "and"? Example: If the light changes from red to blue or from blue to red, you must catch or throw the ball, ...
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0answers
34 views

once, twice, thrice… was there more? [duplicate]

I realize everyone uses 'four times', 'five times'... in case of denoting something repeating more than three times. Even 'thrice' is currently gradually going extinct. But did English ever possess ...
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0answers
17 views

Ordinal numbers as adverbs [duplicate]

I was once told not to end "firstly [point 1], secondly [point2], thirdly [point 3]" in -ly and to leave them as first, second, third etc. Is this always true or only in certain situations? Is it ever ...
3
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1answer
201 views

Why do we use “awfully” as an intensifier?

First, consider this sentence: We lost the game because we played awfully. Since "awful" means "very bad," it makes sense that "awfully" means "very badly." Now, consider these two sentences: ...
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2answers
66 views

“In here” or only “here” [closed]

I would use here with no preposition, like I wish you are here. They are coming here. However talking to a well-educated British woman I noted she would put an in before here. Since then I only ...
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7answers
506 views

Is there a word/term for “verbs which indicate the underlying sentiment of a statement”?

Sorry, I'm not sure the best way to describe this, but hopefully you understand what I mean. Something like the result of the verb(to say) and any adverb(insultingly) = verb(to insult). Another way ...
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4answers
240 views

I'm looking for this word that means showing understanding or assent but may be faux assent

The word had been used with "nodding [such-ly]". If I remember correctly, the person I heard this from was describing one of the attributes you needed to be a manager was to be able to listen to ...
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4answers
309 views

Position of “yet” in a causative sentence

If I have to write a causative sentence in Present Perfect, where should I put yet, at the end of the question or right after the negation? She hasn't had her doors mended by the carpenter yet. ...
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2answers
154 views

“I am a degree holder now” or “I am now a degree holder” [duplicate]

Which one is correct? I am a degree holder now. I am now a degree holder.
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3answers
1k views

Is “out” a preposition or an adverb in these sentences?

Is out a preposition or an adverb in these sentences? "We need to get the hell out of this place." "We need to get out and leave this place."
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1answer
107 views

“Money is all what/that I need.” [duplicate]

1.) Money is all that I need. 2.) Money is all what I need. Which one is right? or which one have you not ever seen? and is there any difference between them? But, what about the following? If ...
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2answers
33 views

which one should I use for this question 'faster or fast' [closed]

I should walk _______ so I can catch up with my brother. Is the answer is fast or faster?
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6answers
344 views

Asking very strongly

I have a problem, how to intensify asking for something without turning to loaded, negative begging. Two heroic fugitives run from authorities and find a temporary hideout. Then two other brave souls ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Is “oftener” obsolete?

Does any native speaker of the English Language ever use oftener instead of more often?
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1answer
59 views

The recognition of the word “Enough”

I came across a sentence and had bugged me ever since. I cannot identify whether the word "Enough" is an adjective, a pronoun, a determiner or an adverb although I highly suspect that is an adjective ...
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1answer
632 views

How to properly identify adverbial modifiers? [closed]

I do not fully understand what they mean by structure of the adverbial modifier or type. Does 'type' mean the question it answers i.e. where, when, how? Below I listed the adverbial modifiers which ...
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2answers
127 views

To what extent is hardly a negative adverb?

The American Heritage Dictionary notes about adverbs like hardly that they are not truly negative in meaning. The sentence Mary hardly laughed means that Mary did laugh a little, not that she ...
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2answers
81 views

Is that sentence is correct [closed]

I wonder that following sentence is correct way to use? It is updated as the user inputs new information. Does As adverb is used in right way in that sentence? Or Do I have to use this sentence ...
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4answers
97 views

meaning of “yet” “as if”

I don't understand the second part of this sentence: The Berlin Congress of 1878 and the first set of frontiers drawn on maps ignored key components of local life, and yet they were drawn as ...
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2answers
282 views

Can 'Too+an adjective' be used to make a non-negative statement?

When one says the following type of sentences, they have a negative connotation. You are too nice. You are too fast. You are too intense. I am curious if there are any instances when we could ...
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1answer
47 views

Where to position adverbs

They may sound both correct but which one is more acceptable in standard written English? She is writing a letter now. or She is now writing a letter. Thanks
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2answers
147 views

Meaning of “sensorily”

As a non-native English speaker, I am having a hard time understanding what the author means by sensorily austere here. The quote is taken from Man in the landscape, by Paul Shepard. The desert is ...
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2answers
565 views

A relative adverb or a conjunction or both?

I am not familiar with the idea that an adverb can function as a conjunction at the same time. Here are a couple of sentences that are confusing me. This is the reason why she left him. ...and ...
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2answers
93 views

Adjective request for fast, lightweightness and multitasking [closed]

I am deciding some product name which has characteristics like Fast and lightweight and multitasking. Please suggest some name which includes these meaning or bird or animal which has such qualities. ...
0
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4answers
99 views

Is there an adverb for “quickly at first, slowly later”?

When water comes out of a faucet at the bottom of a tank, it comes out quickly first and then it tapers off. Is there an adverb for such a case?
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2answers
40 views

Offers home delivery vs home delivers

In which of these 2 sentences is the verb "Home deliver" used correctly, in compliance with the rest of the sentence? ABC offers home delivery of pharmaceuticals, compounded medications, and wellness ...
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4answers
404 views

Is it right to say “before since”?

I wonder if "before since" is right in my sentence. If not, could you please help me improve it? This company provides products since 2010. Consequently, there is no record of this product before ...
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4answers
121 views

What word (e.g. eventually vs potentially) does express better the following scenario? [closed]

The scenario: a) John believes that Peter Parker has a PhD degree. b) Peter Parker is the spider man, but John does not know about this. Which sentence does express the scenario in the best ...
2
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4answers
318 views

Quantification of Frequency Adverbs

This is a list of common frequency adverbs in English with rough estimates of their absolute frequency someone has posted on an ESL study site: Always (100% of the time) Frequently (about 90% of ...
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5answers
915 views

“Love me tender”: adverb or adjective?

Is the last word in each of these phrases an adverb or an adjective? How can we know? love me tender treat me nice hold me tight
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19answers
6k views

What is the “thirsty” equivalent of “ravenously”?

When you eat something very hungrily, you can use the adverb "ravenously" to describe it. But when you drink something very fast in a similar way to quench your thirst, what adverb can you use to ...
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1answer
89 views

Is using “maybe” in combination with a conjugation of “to be” bad style?

I've read this answer about the difference between “maybe” and “may be”. It contains the sentence “maybe he is in the office today” as a correct example. In the above example “maybe” and “is” is ...
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1answer
328 views

Adverb position problems

I am confused about adverbs that can be placed in front of the verb as in: He quickly reads a book. And can be used at the end of the sentence as in: He works hardly Can I mix them as: ...