An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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How to use 'even so'?

We were staying at the most expensive hotel in town. But, even so, there were no toilet rolls in the washroom. I was struck by the use of 'even so' in the above sentence. Is it correct? Shouldn't it ...
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1answer
536 views

“Have you gone” vs. “have you ever gone”

When talking about past experience, what is the difference between these two sentences? Have you gone to Hong Kong? Have you ever gone to Hong Kong?
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152 views

“His words reached her nicely”

Someone told me I can't say, someone's words reached someone else nicely. For example: "His/your words reached me nicely" Is that true?
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2answers
361 views

Can the verb 'be' be modified?

Comments on this question, now closed, considered whether the verb be could be modified by an adverb. This seems a question worth pursuing in its own right, so may I ask what completely modifies in ...
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2answers
602 views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
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1answer
176 views

What does “mostly” modify? [closed]

"My friends are mostly non-smokers." Is "mostly" a focusing adverb that modifies "non-smokers"?
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3answers
169 views

Use of “approximately” [closed]

Is approximately used correctly in the following sentence? Our congregation is comprised of approximately sixty to eighty different ethnic and cultural groups.
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1answer
169 views

When and how did “pretty” enter English as an intensifying adverb?

Today I saw an idiomatic road sign: "Pretty Muddy". I found this lack of strict English on a road sign unusual (on par with my "Dead Slow" official speed limit sign in Leeds, pic below), but as it ...
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5answers
400 views

Orally or Verbally

Which is correct/better to state: He was orally informed OR He was verbally informed. What determines when it is suitable to use either, i.e. verbally or orally.
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1answer
6k views

“Totally agree” and “completely agree”

What is the difference between totally agree and completely agree? In other words, what is the difference in meaning between totally and completely in such combinations in conversations?
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2answers
271 views

position of “only”

Which sentence is correct? (A) Mosquito larvae can only be seen through a microscope. (B) Mosquito larvae can be only seen through a microscope. (C) Mosquito larvae can be seen only through ...
2
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1answer
103 views

who / how / where / what

There was a question on the test that I was not sure which option was correct. The question is "Fill in the blank choosing the most appropriate word." Duke is not ( ) we think him to be. who / ...
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3answers
755 views

Why do many professional writers hate adverbs, and what should be used in their place?

In response to the death of Elmore Leonard the New York Times has posted a list of writing tips he composed back in 2001. Among them is the following: To use an adverb this way (or almost any way) ...
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1answer
405 views

Correct use of either in a conversation

In the following conversation: Person A: I don't like Bob Person B: No, he's annoying. Mind you I don't like Barry, either. It is my understanding that the use of the word "either" is appropriate. ...
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1answer
86 views

What does “apiece” modify?

The head of the American postal system recently lamented the fact that a first-class stamp costs only 46 cents: If you think about 30 billion pieces [of mail] at today’s rate of 46 cents apiece, ...
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3answers
165 views

Is there a rule about using the adverb “utterly” followed by negative adjectives?

I have noticed that most of the time it is the case in usage, but I'm not sure if it is a rule or not. I. e. would it be right to say "utterly wonderful" or does it sound oxymoronic? Thanks
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3answers
4k views

Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?

Since 'great' is an adjective, "I'm doing great" seems to be incorrect. It should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." You could say "I'm doing well." Could you also say "I'm doing greatly."?
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1answer
489 views

Inversion with “many times” at the beginning of a sentence

I am having a discussion with my friend. I said, "Many times I have seen him washing his car." He says it should be, "Many times have I seen him washing his car. Much like "Often do I see him", and ...
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2answers
287 views

Short sentence with adjective and adverb

I think that this is a problem of the usage of adjectives and adverbs (that's why I chose this title): I have a sentence in my presentation, which clarifies that a procedure uses only observations ...
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2answers
278 views

Positioning of adverb phrases [duplicate]

Here are three ways to say the same thing. I wonder if there are particular rules regarding to the position of adverb phrases: Then play those passages over and over again in your memory Or, ...
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1answer
1k views

Any difference between “Are you done?” and “Are you done yet?”

I see people in movies saying Are you done? and Are you done yet? And I wonder what that the addition of yet might mean or suggest in the second version which is absent in the first ...
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1answer
254 views

What's the correct adverb for predict? [closed]

I'm trying to figure out whether it is valid to say the size of ... is predictively determined some sources on the web include predictively as a valid adverb, some don't. And what about ...
4
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1answer
158 views

Always vs Every day

I have lunch at school every day vs I always have lunch at school. Why does the frequency adverb, always, go before the verb, have, whereas the expression, "every day" is placed at the end of ...
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1answer
133 views

“It is time now” or “It is now time”? [closed]

It is time now or It is now time Which of these expressions is grammatically correct?
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3answers
121 views

Do I use adjective forms of concurrent and consecutive?

Should this passage use the adjectival or adverbial forms of concurrent and consecutive? The trial court also sentenced the defendant to five life sentences (with parole) and five 15-year ...
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1answer
2k views

Which one is correct “et al.’s” or “et al.”?

I want to use the possessive noun form with et al. as in et al.'s versus et al.
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1answer
145 views

Is this an appropriate usage of “but” at the beginning of a sentence? [duplicate]

I try my best to use proper sentence construction and punctuation, and for my amusement, I've taken the quest to find meaningful situations where one might use the various conjunctions at the ...
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4answers
399 views

Can you say “he too wanted to do it” or is it better to say “he wanted to do it too”?

English is not my mother tonge and I had this argument with a friend the other day. I think that putting the "too" after the subject instead of at the end of the sentence is not correct but he ...
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2answers
123 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
2
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1answer
382 views

Is there any difference between nevertheless and never the less?

I saw this on eBay's website: You can sell multiple items that, even though they are against eBay policy, don’t get you caught. Never the less, they are against the rules and can result in ...
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1answer
124 views

Grammatical role of “kind of” [closed]

I would like to know what the grammatical construct "kind of + v" is? I kind of like cold weather or I kind of eat everything".
2
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1answer
720 views

How can I identify the role of an infinitive in a sentence?

Infinitives may function as nouns, adjectives or adverbs. Since infinitives are derived from verbs, they do express actions or states of being. However, there is some difficulty in identifying the ...
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1answer
166 views

Position of adverbial phrase [duplicate]

Is there a difference in these two sentences, and if so, what is the difference? Immediately afterwards I remembered having met her. I remembered having met her immediately afterwards. I think ...
12
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5answers
482 views

Is it OK to use “empty-handed” on an animal?

Can I write the following? One of the seagulls spotted a fish and dove after it, but came up empty-handed If not, what other word I can use to replace empty-handed?
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1answer
178 views

How to best explain the use of best?

I've been asked to explain the use of best in the phrase "humans have found how best to live together" other than saying its an adverb I'm stumped, could someone wiser help me out.
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2answers
231 views

Can we say “naively honestly”? [duplicate]

Is this expression acceptable? I told her the whole story naively honestly. Thank you.
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3answers
554 views

Is there any real difference between “to” as a preposition and “to” as an adverb?

I'm really in doubt. On the free dictionary I read this concept of "to" as a preposition: "1. (used for expressing motion or direction toward a place, person, or thing approached and reached): Come to ...
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3answers
2k views

“Recently” vs. “lately”

I haven't seen Mr. John __. Which is correct, recently or lately? My uncle has been to Germany lately. Why is the correct answer in the second example lately and not recently?
2
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1answer
69 views

“Thence” to allude to the past

I see that "hence" means roughly "from this fact/time/place/source", while "thence" means roughly "from that fact/time/place/source". Usage such as "half an hour hence" is typically (although perhaps ...
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4answers
186 views

“It can be safely deleted” vs. “It can safely be deleted”

Is there a subtle difference between the following two sentences? It can be safely deleted. It can safely be deleted. If they mean the same thing, is one preferred for other reasons?
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1answer
59 views

scattered from, against, or by? [closed]

A quick Google search gives me the following sentences: An electron is scattered from a nucleus. An electron is scattered against a nucleus. An electron is scattered by a nucleus. Which one is ...
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2answers
217 views

“Each” — pronoun or adverb

I am looking at these two sentences: M and W are letters that each have 4 strokes. M and W are letters and each has 4 strokes. It seems that each is an adverb in (1) but a pronoun in ...
4
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0answers
117 views

He began to breathe deep / deeply [duplicate]

This is from Light in August, by W. Faulkner, Chapter 18: He began to breathe deep. He could feel himself breathing deep, (...) This confused me deep. (This is related but not an answer to my ...
4
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3answers
244 views

Payment to be due within three months “of” that meeting

Does the word "of" in the context of an established point in time refer to before or after that established point in time?
6
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2answers
319 views

A word for something that's done only half-consciously

In writing fiction, I find myself using the word "absentmindedly" a lot, but I don't think it's really the word I'm looking for. I'm not looking so much something done in a distracted manner, but ...
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0answers
14 views

John hasn't directly worked with him [duplicate]

"John hasn't directly worked with him" or "John hasn't worked with him directly"? What's the correct form?
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1answer
458 views

If you place an ly adverb after the verb is the meaning different than if it were infront of the verb? [duplicate]

For example: I did not respond physically I did not physically respond I can't escape the sense that #2 'strongly' leaves open the possibility (or implies) that the writer responded some way ...
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2answers
258 views

What's the difference between “She came home angry” and “She came home angrily” [closed]

Are these two sentences grammatically correct? What's the difference between them? She came home angry She came home angrily
1
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1answer
85 views

“The paper on Monday published X” vs. “the paper published on Monday X”

What would be the best position of Monday in the following sentence — before or after the verb? The paper on Monday published what the artist called a blunt attack on people’s right to privacy. ...
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1answer
134 views

“Would of course be” vs. “of course would be” [duplicate]

I am not sure about the position of 'of course' inside a sentence. Please consider these two versions and comment on that: A comprehensive documentation would of course be highly valuable... ...