An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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130 views

Why do we say “so much more” rather than “so more ”? Why do we have to put the much in?

If the definition of the word so is an extent, then why do we have to put another word that describes a quantity after it, as "so much more" or "so much better"? Why can't we just say, so more or so ...
2
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1answer
60 views

Will I love you forever? or Will I love you for ever?

http://youtu.be/cgNMSJTevAk?t=2m10s This test states that the correct answer is: "Will I love you for ever?" There are numerous songs\articles on the internet that say that "forever" is the right ...
2
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1answer
128 views

Meaning of “over in”

I read this sentence in a book: I just took part in a study over in the Psychology Department. Why do we add over in front of in the here?
4
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2answers
591 views

Compound adjectives functioning as adverbs modifying other adjectives; is it possible and grammatical?

Soul-crushingly bad; heartbreakingly sad; bone-crunchingly violent; etc. I swear I have seen it done, but I am not sure whether it's proper grammar or not.
5
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7answers
8k views

“I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you”

What is the correct usage? Apparently it is "I feel badly", but but wouldn't that mean you have an inadequate ability to feel?
9
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3answers
19k views

“I'm home” or “I'm at home”

The second form looks more correct to me, but the first expression is present in several titles of movies and songs. Which form is preferable?
1
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2answers
96 views

Conjugations of Ancillary

Ancillary is already something of an uncommon word in conversation, but it came up recently in a StackOverflow chat room in the following example: Person 1: "Are you talking about me?" Person 2: ...
2
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2answers
54 views

Difference between “hop the rocks quickly” and “quickly hop the rocks”

I'm trying to decide which sentence is correct, or if they both are. which would you recommend as easier to read/understand for the average reader? Hop the rocks quickly and get the star. ...
0
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4answers
150 views

Position of “yet” in a causative sentence

If I have to write a causative sentence in Present Perfect, where should I put yet, at the end of the question or right after the negation? She hasn't had her doors mended by the carpenter yet. ...
1
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2answers
81 views

Compound adverb — “kick-start a party soccer style”

I have asked this question in ELL site, but there were not much reply, and so I decided to ask the same question here. Though I will change the question a little bit to exactly what I need more and to ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Using “respectively” with “and” vs. “or”

Is it acceptable usage to use "or" with "respectively", or is it possible only with "and"? Example: If the light changes from red to blue or from blue to red, you must catch or throw the ball, ...
0
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0answers
34 views

once, twice, thrice… was there more? [duplicate]

I realize everyone uses 'four times', 'five times'... in case of denoting something repeating more than three times. Even 'thrice' is currently gradually going extinct. But did English ever possess ...
1
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0answers
16 views

Ordinal numbers as adverbs [duplicate]

I was once told not to end "firstly [point 1], secondly [point2], thirdly [point 3]" in -ly and to leave them as first, second, third etc. Is this always true or only in certain situations? Is it ever ...
26
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4answers
4k views

“Specially” vs “especially”

When should each of them be used?
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2answers
46 views

“In here” or only “here” [closed]

I would use here with no preposition, like I wish you are here. They are coming here. However talking to a well-educated British woman I noted she would put an in before here. Since then I only ...
3
votes
2answers
511 views

position of “only”

Which sentence is correct? (A) Mosquito larvae can only be seen through a microscope. (B) Mosquito larvae can be only seen through a microscope. (C) Mosquito larvae can be seen only through ...
1
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4answers
324 views

Need a word for "Should not have happened' with a negative context

I'm looking for a word to mean "should not have happened." I'm trying to relate this situation; two paths - one positive, one negative - with the same end result, and the negative path was taken. ...
2
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3answers
223 views

Is “out” a preposition or an adverb in these sentences?

Is out a preposition or an adverb in these sentences? "We need to get the hell out of this place." "We need to get out and leave this place."
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2answers
260 views

What is the comparative form of the adverb “nicely”?

The adjective nice can be inflected: nicer, nicest. Can the derived adverb nicely be inflected as well, or does it only have the absolute form?
9
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4answers
9k views

“Maybe” versus “perhaps”

Was there ever a real distinction between the two? I always have the urge to use maybe for discussing state and perhaps for actions. I know this is only because perhaps (by hap) and happen (befall by ...
0
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1answer
264 views

How to properly identify adverbial modifiers? [closed]

I do not fully understand what they mean by structure of the adverbial modifier or type. Does 'type' mean the question it answers i.e. where, when, how? Below I listed the adverbial modifiers which ...
-1
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2answers
78 views

“I am a degree holder now” or “I am now a degree holder” [duplicate]

Which one is correct? I am a degree holder now. I am now a degree holder.
0
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4answers
95 views

Is there an adverb for “quickly at first, slowly later”?

When water comes out of a faucet at the bottom of a tank, it comes out quickly first and then it tapers off. Is there an adverb for such a case?
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4answers
17k views

“A bit” vs. “a little bit” vs. “a little”

Is there a difference between a bit, a little bit and a little in the following context? He is a little bit angry. He is a little angry. He is a bit angry. Or do these sentences mean the ...
3
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3answers
7k views

the difference between “really” and “very”

Is the statement below true about the difference between really and very when really means “very” in the example “It’s very/really hot in the summer”? “Really” shows more involvement, even ...
2
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3answers
23k views

What is the precise meaning of “Pretty Good”?

Once I used "pretty good" as a reply to one of my friends' question "How are you today?", I was under the impression that the "pretty good" will weigh much more than just "good", means "very good" or ...
2
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5answers
2k views

Meaning of 'constantly' in 'everything is fluid, is constantly changing…'

Heraclitus: everything is and is not, for everything is fluid, is constantly changing, constantly coming into being and passing away. If 'constantly' means 'no stop in every little seconds' then ...
3
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1answer
72 views

“Money is all what/that I need.” [duplicate]

1.) Money is all that I need. 2.) Money is all what I need. Which one is right? or which one have you not ever seen? and is there any difference between them? But, what about the following? If ...
2
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6answers
165 views

Asking very strongly

I have a problem, how to intensify asking for something without turning to loaded, negative begging. Two heroic fugitives run from authorities and find a temporary hideout. Then two other brave souls ...
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votes
2answers
29 views

which one should I use for this question 'faster or fast' [closed]

I should walk _______ so I can catch up with my brother. Is the answer is fast or faster?
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2answers
841 views

'Statistically significant associated to' — [Adv + Adj] as Adv?

Is 'XXX is statistically significant associated to YYY.' grammatically correct ? One of my friends says this is seen in many papers with statistics. Shouldn't it be '... statistically significantly ...
2
votes
1answer
367 views

Is “oftener” obsolete?

Does any native speaker of the English Language ever use oftener instead of more often?
1
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1answer
52 views

The recognition of the word “Enough”

I came across a sentence and had bugged me ever since. I cannot identify whether the word "Enough" is an adjective, a pronoun, a determiner or an adverb although I highly suspect that is an adjective ...
4
votes
3answers
41k views

Use of a semicolon before and comma after “however”

Several years ago, a previous boss told me to use a semicolon and comma with the word "however". I've always questioned this and would like to know if the following random sentences are using the ...
1
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2answers
101 views

To what extent is hardly a negative adverb?

The American Heritage Dictionary notes about adverbs like hardly that they are not truly negative in meaning. The sentence Mary hardly laughed means that Mary did laugh a little, not that she ...
8
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5answers
871 views

Indian English use of “only”

I am from Bangalore and people here tend use the word only to emphasise something in a sentence. For example: We are getting that only printed. What is the proper way to put it?
0
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2answers
63 views

Is that sentence is correct [closed]

I wonder that following sentence is correct way to use? It is updated as the user inputs new information. Does As adverb is used in right way in that sentence? Or Do I have to use this sentence ...
1
vote
4answers
22k views

How do you differentiate “thru”, “threw”, “through”, and “thorough”?

How do I know which word to use in the correct context? How do I recognize these words when hearing them? Examples: Jimmy threw the ring at Emiko. Elvis walked through the door. ...
10
votes
4answers
56k views

Difference between “publicly” and “publically”

I know publically appears as an incorrect spelling in most dictionaries (in fact as I type this up on my Safari browser it keeps trying to correct the spelling to publicly). However I have seen the ...
1
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2answers
321 views

Adverb placement

Are the sentences below grammatically correct? I didn't support Gheddafi and I will never support him. I didn't support Gheddafi and will never support him. I didn't support Gheddafi and never ...
1
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4answers
88 views

meaning of “yet” “as if”

I don't understand the second part of this sentence: The Berlin Congress of 1878 and the first set of frontiers drawn on maps ignored key components of local life, and yet they were drawn as ...
3
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1answer
248 views

Does it make sense to end this sentence with “manually”

This sentence: Verify that the table includes the configured values manually. Is it the same as saying: Manually verify that the table includes the configured values. or the same as: ...
3
votes
2answers
460 views

Where to place 'only' relative to prepositions?

I know that questions about the placement of 'only', are often asked here; accordingly, I searched for an answer to my question before posting it. Question Where are focusing adverbs placed relative ...
1
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1answer
3k views

Adverb placement: “There is still” vs. “there still is”

I believe the following sentences are grammatically correct and that perhaps the latter has an emphasizing effect on still in certain contexts. There is still some time left. There still is some ...
4
votes
2answers
916 views

Adverbs + Present Perfect

Here's my problem: I've been confused about the placement of adverbs in present/past perfect phrases. For example, which sentence would sound better: "We had been slowly drifting down the river ...
3
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5answers
256 views

Placement of 'Little'

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, 'little' as an adverb could mean: not much; only slightly Is there a preference among these sentences? He little helped his ...
0
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2answers
123 views

Can 'Too+an adjective' be used to make a non-negative statement?

When one says the following type of sentences, they have a negative connotation. You are too nice. You are too fast. You are too intense. I am curious if there are any instances when we could ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

Which position does “really” and “quite” go?

I know really is an adverb, and one that intensifies the verb. I also know that some adverbs go only in the beginning; in the middle or at the end of a sentence, and some can be placed in all three ...
1
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1answer
41 views

Where to position adverbs

They may sound both correct but which one is more acceptable in standard written English? She is writing a letter now. or She is now writing a letter. Thanks
0
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1answer
197 views

“It is time now” or “It is now time”? [closed]

It is time now or It is now time Which of these expressions is grammatically correct?