An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Adverbs describing Adverbs

We have a similar question here, but I think my examples are a bit different and I would love to understand how this is done correctly. Let's say we are talking about significantly higher ...
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92 views

Position of the adverb “substantially”

What would be the right position of "substantially" in the following: 1). Before verb: These optimal values substantially contribute to the success of the methodology. 2). After verb: These ...
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2k views

What is the grammatical function of “never”?

What is the grammatical function of "never" in the following sentence? You will have to do something you've never done. Is it an adverb? My father disagrees with this. In "I have studied" vs. "...
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Subject-auxiliary inversions not associated with questions [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Inversion in “only [adverb] have they” Is there some rule governing the following, or similar, subject-auxiliary inversions (*"Rarely they do see the light of day", *"Never ...
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2answers
250 views

To what extent is hardly a negative adverb?

The American Heritage Dictionary notes about adverbs like hardly that they are not truly negative in meaning. The sentence Mary hardly laughed means that Mary did laugh a little, not that she ...
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2answers
60 views

Placing of adverb in a sentence

"This should perfectly be done". "This should be perfectly done". Of the two sentences, which one is correct? I am confused about placing of adverb "perfectly". Should the adverb be placed before "be"...
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5answers
890 views

How did the adjective “just” come to take on so many adverbial meanings?

Just is a pretty useful adverb. It can carry several different meanings: very recently: I just finished the novel. exactly: That’s just what he meant. by a narrow margin: He just missed me ...
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1answer
66 views

What is the difference between “ago” and “before”? [closed]

What is the difference between ago and before when they are both used as adverbs in the following sentences: I saw him seven days ago. and I had seen him seven days before.
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78 views

Moreover between commas

While writing, I am often tempted to write sentences as: It is, moreover, clear that... or We have, in addition, other things to take into account. Is the use of the conjunctive adverbs ...
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1answer
49 views

Splitting the components of a compound verb [duplicate]

I've always understood that splitting infinitives should be avoided; e.g., instead of To boldly go where no man has gone before. use To go boldly where no man has gone before. With that in ...
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40 views

Use of “then” as “therefore” [closed]

I am confused about the following use of then: «I can't come to Bristol in the afternoon, sorry» «Let's meet around noon, then.» «I can't do it, I am sorry.» «Well, I'll do it, then!» I ...
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1answer
39 views

Can you “slide your finger across a word”? [closed]

How would you explain users of a mobile game how to use this feature ? I have a few ideas but I fear they might not sound natural to native English speakers: "Display the definition of any word by ...
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1answer
887 views

Degrees of comparison for words ending in “-ly”

Would you make a word ending in -ly positive, comparative, or superlative? I'm sort of leaning towards positive at the moment, and if the answer is positive, would you put more and most for ...
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3answers
133 views

Adverbs modifying nouns?

1. What this question is about It is about cases where an adverb apparently modifies a word of a type that adverbs aren't supposed to be able to modify, like nouns and personal pronouns. It is very ...
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2answers
80 views

Difference between an adverb modifying an NP consisting a single noun, and an adverb modifying a noun

Consider the following examples: The work is mostly Kim's. Only Kim resigned. A question some of us had (e.g. here and here) was, aren't these examples of adverbs modifying nouns (which they are not ...
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2answers
88 views

Live curious or live curiously? [closed]

Why does national geographic use "live curious" instead of "live curiously"? I suppose we should use adverbs to describe verbs.
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1answer
154 views

“Look real” or “look realistic”?

Which phrase is correct "the ship model looks real" or "the ship model looks realistic?" It seems that according to some dictionary definitions they are both acceptable in this case.
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2k views

How do you modify an adverb with another adverb?

This is the case I have in mind. I wish to express that impact acted in a way that was severely adverse. It impacted her severely adversely. The proposed text above doesn't feel right at all, ...
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1answer
56 views

Further or Farther in a metaphor about a road [duplicate]

In this metaphor is it correct to use "further" or "farther"? That only kicks the can further/farther down the road. Within the metaphor, the distance is physical, justifying the use of "farther"...
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3k views

“strongly” or “strong”?

Is strongly correct in the following, or should it be strong? ... and had a strongly Protestant and unionist identity. What is the explanation in grammar terms? Context.
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2answers
237 views

Adverbs with prepositions

Much to my surprise, I've read recently that some adverbs do not inherit prepositional constructions from the adjectives they come from, for example: "The proof of Theorem 3 is similar to that of ...
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0answers
71 views

Nowhere near and nowhere close to

I am so confused about which is modifying which. In the sentence below: It was nowhere close to being done. Nowhere: An adverb modifying close It's the farthest I could get. I don't know if ...
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2answers
30k views

Difference between “recently” and “lately”

I have posted a topic using this sentence: I have picked some fictions to read lately. RegDwight edited this sentence to: I have recently picked up several works of fiction and begun to read ...
2
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1answer
82 views

“It's as same watch as the one I lost.” - What is wrong with the sentence?

Are the following sentences grammatically correct? If not, what's wrong with them? It's as same watch as the one I lost. It's the same watch as I lost.
2
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1answer
175 views

Is there a single word to describe “acting in a way unbecoming of a parent?” [closed]

In writing a letter today, I realized I was in need of a word outside my knowledge. I would like to convey that someone acting in a manner unbecoming of parents. In a world where neologisms were ...
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3answers
4k views

Is “oftener” obsolete?

Does any native speaker of the English Language ever use oftener instead of more often?
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3answers
120 views

“He likes it tomorrow” / “We leave for Hawaii tomorrow” - Why is the first sentence bad?

The following sentences sound right to me: The package arrives tomorrow. (The package is going to arrive tomorrow) We leave for Hawaii tomorrow. (We are going to leave for Hawaii tomorrow) ...
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1answer
90 views

Completely, Utterly, or Tremendously excited?

What intensifier would be good for "EXCITED"? And why? I would also need an article or something to strengthen my knowledge of intensifiers, whether (and why) adjectives (or whatever) are gradable ...
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1answer
59 views

Usage of “else” to convey the opposite meaning

I am writing an email to a senior and want to say if he agrees to my suggested changes and if no I will modify it further. So is this ok to say: Kindly suggest if you agree to this revised ...
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5answers
173 views

What is the correct word for 'worrylessly'?

What would be the appropriate word for worrylessly in this following context "I shall prefer him for this task. And [worrylessly] expect an amazing result.
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6answers
163 views

One-word adverb meaning 'with difficulty', 'not easily'?

Is there a one-word adverb meaning 'with difficulty', 'not easily'? I am working on a grid for assessing pronunciation in speaking (correct sounds, correct intonations) and want to have a scale on ...
5
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1answer
222 views

Helping-adverbs vs. Helping-adjectives vs. Adverbs of degree

I've recently come across the terms helping-adverb and helping-adjective in some old grammar books. From the book A practical grammar of the English language (by Roscoe Goddard Greene, 1830): A ...
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3answers
1k views

Why is it “to take someone seriously” and not “to take someone serious”?

Obviously the difference between these two sentences is that one is using an adverb while the other one is using an adjective. The reason why I think that an adjective should be used, is that the ...
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2answers
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Correct usage of “viz.”?

Are these two sentences examples of the correct use of "viz."? This book is dedicated to my family, viz. my parents and two sisters. The purpose of this book is twofold, viz. 1) to show that [...]; ...
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Is there a difference between “Who necessarily do not exist” or “who do not exist necessarily”?

This is from the English version of the book "The Name of the Rose" by Umberto Eco. Brother William was arguing that the non-Christian people should also be given the right to rule. Here are some ...
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3answers
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Is “very less” correct English?

Is using very less correct English? My friend suggests it should be very little. Are they both correct, or is there a difference?
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4answers
164k views

Difference between “publicly” and “publically”

I know publically appears as an incorrect spelling in most dictionaries (in fact as I type this up on my Safari browser it keeps trying to correct the spelling to publicly). However I have seen the ...
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2answers
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Is “not actual” in “potential, not actual harm” an adjective phrase or an adverbial phrase?

I think this affects comma placement, right? If it's an adjective phrase modifying harm, then I think it would be: "potential, not actual harm" If it's an adverb phrase modifying potential (by ...
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1answer
57 views

'Just now': past, future or both?

I only use it speaking of something that has just been done, i.e. in the very near past. I've finished washing the dishes just now. Can it be used also speaking of something that is about to be ...
3
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4answers
140 views

Word for “complementing each other, while showing an increase in intensity”

I have 2 sentences. The sentences are: In college, I wrote a simple calendar program. Concurrently, 2 years on, I am working on developing a complex universal calendar system. Here, I want "...
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2answers
119 views

“Each” in potential subject position in compound sentence always pronoun?

This question is related to: "Each" — pronoun or adverb The sentence in that question is: M and W are letters and each has 4 strokes In that sentence, how do we know that “each” is a ...
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4answers
484 views

What meaning is “legitimate(ly)” gaining?

I'm familiar with the following meanings of legitimately In a way that conforms to the law or to rules and In a way that can be defended with logic or justification; fairly (both from ODO)...
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3k views

“How deep” or “How deeply”?

In the sentence: How deep or deeply should I study something? Which of the two is more appropriate?
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58 views

Word for doing something but not wanting other people to notice? [closed]

It's not secretly. For example, I'm at a mall with a friend, then I notice someone from my school. I point to them to show my friend, who I go to school with. But I don't want the other person to ...
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2answers
38 views

Why are both blazing or blazingly appropriate?

This SE QA explains that both blazing and blazingly are valid English words (despite what my spell-checker claims). Can anyone explain why they are both valid, and the difference between the words. ...
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1k views

Position of adverb 'globally' in sentence and meaning of sentence

Please help me make sense of this sentence with regards to 'globally'. In the global arena, xxxxxx has been described as the solution to the challenges facing the commodities market globally ...
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5answers
30k views

“Eventually” vs. “finally”

What is the difference between finally and eventually? He eventually escaped and made his way back to England. He finally escaped and made his way back to England.
2
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1answer
72 views

What part of speech is “alight” in “set alight”?

In the clause it was set alight, is alight acting as adverb and modifying was set an adjective and modifying it; or something else entirely that I'm missing. I'm fairly certain that set ...
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“along” in “the wolf passed something along to me”

Here is a quote by Jack Nicholson from the movie "Wolf": Since it happened I feel as though the wolf passed something along to me. I wonder why is along needed in that sentence? What difference ...
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'but' for contrast and 'but' for opposition

But does not mean the same thing in I like pop music but my parents like classical music. and in My parents have played a lot of classical music to me but I still don't like it. What is ...