An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Why is there no such word as “percentagely”?

If I want to use an adverb to say, for example: I'm not sure you could do it. I can say that percentagely / in percentage there are few hopes. Is there a specific reason there is no such word in ...
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49 views

Is there any difference between these two sentences?

What is the difference between "not a bit" and "not one bit"? I thought they both have the same meaning, but I was wondering if there could be a slight difference meaning between those phrases. For ...
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1answer
2k views

easier, more easily, or easy [duplicate]

I'm a programmer and I'm combing through some code and entering comments to help other developers. I wrote the following sentence and got confused by the (possibly) dangling verb. I've spared you the ...
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83 views

Omitted words in a sentence [duplicate]

Here is an excerpt from Steve Job's speech. "...On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind __________ you might find yourself walking along if ...
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3answers
504 views

Is there a rule about using the adverb “utterly” followed by negative adjectives?

I have noticed that most of the time it is the case in usage, but I'm not sure if it is a rule or not. I. e. would it be right to say "utterly wonderful" or does it sound oxymoronic? Thanks
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223 views

Is there an unkindly way to say thank you? [duplicate]

Are you not already being kind by saying thank you to begin with? I read the comments on this site What's the deal with thank you kindly?, and I guess that I am still pretty confused as to the ...
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1answer
69 views

usage of adverb never [closed]

Is this sentence correct? "We had a fight and never spoke again". I think the verb "spoke" should be either in simple present or present perfect, shouldn't it?
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1answer
76 views

Fail fast versus fail faster [closed]

Wow, I had no idea that people responding to this post would be so "nit picky"!!! I just wanted an answer on what the proper form of the phrase "fail fast" to use? Adverbs do not need to end in -ly, ...
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1answer
40 views

Punch him good? [duplicate]

I some time ago saw some sentences, "Punch him good", "You punch really good". I assume, that good works as adverb and means well. Upon assuming, I got a question: How has the word good become to mean ...
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1answer
254 views

Is “each” an adverb, pronoun, determiner, or what else? [duplicate]

What do Online Dictionaries Say? Cambridge Dictionaries Online says each is used as an adverb in the following examples: There are five leaflets – please take one of each. Each of the brothers ...
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1answer
55 views

What does “independent” bind to in this sentence? [closed]

Which of the following two sentences is correct? A is valid independent of B. A is valid independently of B. In other words, does independent bind to "are" or "valid"? I tend towards the first ...
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57 views

An example when adverbials can exchange positions

I am searching two short (4-5 word) grammatical sentences that have two adverbials adv1 and adv2 inside, and in sentence A, adv1 is applied to VP and than adv2, but in sentence B the order is ...
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“However difficult something is, …” or “However difficult something may/might be, …” ? [duplicate]

Does it make sense to follow an adjective phrase such as "however difficult" with the modal auxiliaries "may/might"? Isn't it a bit pleonastic, since "however" already contains the idea of either ...
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4answers
119 views

“Continuously” vs “continually”: What's the difference? [closed]

What's the difference in the usage of these two adverbs continuously and continually? Here are some examples: a) She was told off for continually being late. b) It rained continuously for ...
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1answer
27 views

Adverbial Form of “Supplementary” [closed]

Does the word "supplementary" have an adverbial form? My first instinct is the word "supplementarily," but as far as I can tell that isn't a word.
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3answers
5k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
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1answer
46 views

Arguably- does the adverb carries “what I am saying is unarguable” connotation [duplicate]

Arguably- “I’m a little confused about the usage of this word. "Roger Federer is arguably the best tennis player ever. This is what I heard in a conversation. My point is does the statement ...
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1answer
243 views

What is the difference between “because” and “for”? [closed]

Is there any substantial difference in the usage of "because"and "for"in a sentence/
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1answer
151 views

word order of here + adverb + noun, e.g. here used method

I have been encountering several examples (in scientific papers), where people used constructions like "the here used method", "the here investigated case", etc.. I have been thinking that it is ...
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0answers
67 views

Does the difference between an adjective and an adverb ever disambiguate? [closed]

Imagine that adverbs were banned from the English language, and we had to replace them all with their cognate adjectives. Language would begin to sound bad to our ears that are attuned to the ...
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0answers
50 views

Is it ok to write “very huge” in this context? [duplicate]

I think it is ok to write "very huge" in a context like this (although "very" is a bit redundant here): This is a very huge map. However, the following sounds strange to me: This map is very ...
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1answer
102 views

We did it at exactly the right time vs We did it at the exactly right time.

I know the first example is correct and I'm pretty sure the second is incorrect, but I wonder why. So, we can say "I saw an extremely angry dog", but not "I saw extremely an angry dog." When do we ...
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1answer
74 views

Can I be “friendfully yours” [closed]

friendly (advs). : Used to mean 'in a friendly manner. I am wondering if "friendfully" was/is in standard usage and would I sound primitive or ungrammatical if I dare write "friendfully yours" ...
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6answers
216 views

Even though + Adverb usage

I'm not sure if these sample sentences below are grammatically incorrect, but they sound very odd to me. I couldn't see the man even though actually he was there. He still got hit even though ...
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2answers
8k views

“Thus” vs. “Thusly”

I read an article that used "thusly" and was wondering if there is any grammatical credence to it. The quote: The issue started when Sokolowski quickly ran out of storage capacity in his 32GB ...
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4answers
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What exactly does “already” mean when used in the imperative mood?

This is a question about American English usage of the word "already". As a UK resident I don't completely understand when I hear Americans give commands like "Stop it already!" In the UK the word ...
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2answers
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Is “oftener” obsolete?

Does any native speaker of the English Language ever use oftener instead of more often?
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5answers
3k views

Why is “fastly” not a word?

As well as being an adjective, fast is an adverb. We use it all the time as such: He ran fast. However, though slow is definitely an adjective, it sounds wrong when used as an adverb, because ...
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6answers
747 views

Which adverb implies supreme confidence, falling just shy of arrogance?

When he participated in debates and round table discussions, Christopher Hitchens spoke with supreme confidence. I'd like to replace with supreme confidence with an adverb that implies supreme ...
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6answers
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Explanation of “must needs”

Recently I ran across the sentence: "Just why the law prescribed thirty-nine lashes instead of forty or forty-one and so on, must needs remain unanswered." How did a plural verb like "needs" ...
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4answers
8k views

“Adverbial phrase” vs “Adverbial clause”

Please tell me what the difference is between an adverbial phrase and an adverbial clause.
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57 views

can someone tell me if i am right in identifying the odd word out from these group of words? [closed]

a) taken WENT seen forgotten--- because the rest are verbs b) bright EARLY good some------because the rest are adjectives ??? c) NEVER but unless ...
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3answers
120 views

What's the correct usage of “agree some days” vs. “agree on some days”?

"However, workers and employers can agree longer holidays". I have searched online. I also referred to two reference books : the blue book of grammar and grammar rules. I don't see a usage as of ...
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4answers
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What does “enough” mean in expressions like “Fair enough” or “Funny enough”?

As a non-native speaker, I already get used to the word enough in expressions like those below, but I sometimes still got confused of it. It makes me wonder what it actually means and where does it ...
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3answers
129 views

“completely” usage confusion

As I know, verbs are followed by adverbs. So, which is true? "She stands there completely expressionlessly" Or "she stands there completely expressionless" Though I think the second one is likely to ...
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5answers
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Ambiguity with adverbs when using the word “or”

If you take the sentence "Bob will run or walk fast." how is the ambiguity resolved between the following two meanings? Bob will either run fast or he will walk fast. Bob will either ...
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1answer
49 views

Is 'unassumingly' a real word? [closed]

So I'm trying to say 'in a way that doesn't draw attention from others'. Is 'unassumingly' right word for that or what kind of adverb should I use? Thanks in advance.
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8answers
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“Almost until 1900” or “until almost 1900”: which one is correct?

Although various eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American poets had professed an interest in Native American poetry and had pretended to imitate Native American forms in their own works, it was ...
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1answer
166 views

The variations of in/for the last few days

1.I was not able to gain access to Internet in last a few days. 2.I was not able to gain access to Internet last a few days. 3.I was not able to gain access to Internet in a few days. ...
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2answers
34k views

“Yet” at the beginning of a sentence

Can one use "Yet" at the beginning of a sentence as follows? Yet, he came late. Is this grammatical?
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4answers
1k views

Why is “well” used with linking verbs instead of “good”? [duplicate]

As any grammar handbook, English teacher, or parent correcting a child will tell you, you're supposed to say "I don't feel well" instead of "I don't feel good." Well rather than good seems to be used ...
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110 views

“Turn slightly right” or “Turn slight right”

This is a grammatical question. For a route navigation, which expression is better to say? "slight" is adjective and "slightly" is adverb, so I guess "Turn slightly right" would be the correct in ...
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1answer
95 views

True meaning of these 'adverbials'

Recently I had a discussion with someone and the following examples were brought up. I was told that I was wrong, but as a native speaker I don't think any of my explanations of the meaning were ...
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5answers
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Identifying verb types, nouns, adjectives and adverbs in a sentence - 5th grade

While helping my son, who happens to be in the 5th grade, with his English grammar, I have realized that I am confused. The following sentence, that I gave him as an exercise, he has identified the ...
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2answers
814 views

Do 'already' and 'just' require the present perfect?

Compare: 'We already/just gave him a response'. 'We have already/just given him a response'. Do 'already' and 'just' strictly require the present perfect?
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4answers
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14
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721 views

Grammatical role of “the hell”?

I’m wondering exactly which grammatical role the word hell takes on in expressions such as Get the hell out of here the hell in this case seems to modify the phrasal verb to get out (get out ...
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72 views

How did the adjective “just” come to take on so many adverbial meanings?

Just is a pretty useful adverb. It can carry several different meanings: very recently: I just finished the novel. exactly: That’s just what he meant. by a narrow margin: He just missed me ...
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1answer
293 views

Usage of adverbs like reasonably, practically, essentially, ridiculously, basically

I have recently noticed a phenomenon in English, that seems quite common. The phenomenon is regarding the usage of certain adverbs: Practically should mean in a practical manner. But it is often ...