An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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4answers
41k views

Using “seldomly”

I'm not a native English speaker. If at all possible I try to use spell checkers while writing anything on the web hence using one in Firefox as well. Whenever I try to write "seldomly" it highlights ...
3
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2answers
780 views

Verb form of “spontaneous human combustion”

In English there are plenty of examples of noun-verbs. What are the rules for making more complex compound noun structures into transitive verbs? In particular I would like explanations involving the ...
3
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2answers
2k views

The word ‘dryly’ as an adverb

What is the correct use of the word dryly in the following sentence? You said that very dryly. Is dryly correct in this context?
1
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2answers
428 views

Could “extraordinary few exceptions” be correct?

In his 1991 book, historian J.B. Russel writes: with extraordinary few exceptions no educated person ... believed that the earth was flat Should extraordinary be an adverb, or could this ...
3
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2answers
5k views

Why use 'way' in this sentence? [closed]

This question is way too vague Why not just: "This question is too vague"? What's the meaning of 'way' in this sentence?
1
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2answers
812 views

What does “an adverb tells us something about the sentence” mean?

Wikipedia states : In grammar an adverbial is a word (an adverb) or a group of words (an adverbial phrase or an adverbial clause) that modifies or tells us something about the sentence or the ...
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2answers
3k views

Adverbs for Dirty (Dirtily?)

It is common to simply use 'dirty' as the adverb here, ex: He talks dirty. Other resources say that the adverb is dirtily! I do not believe I've ever heard this used... is it correct?
3
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2answers
8k views

How should I use “passive-aggressive” as an adverb?

How should I use "passive-aggressive" as an adverb? My hunch is that this is correct: Jack passive-aggressively said nothing. What I consider incorrect: Jack passively-aggressively said ...
2
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5answers
3k views

Meaning of 'constantly' in 'everything is fluid, is constantly changing…'

Heraclitus: everything is and is not, for everything is fluid, is constantly changing, constantly coming into being and passing away. If 'constantly' means 'no stop in every little seconds' then ...
3
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2answers
2k views

I need <something> yesterday?

Is it correct to say: I need those reports, and I need them yesterday. Shouldn't it be: I needed those reports yesterday. Or is this aberrant usage style simply a colloquialism?
3
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1answer
590 views

Is “these are also hidden features as well” a redundant sentence?

These are also hidden features as well. Is this redundant? I do this a lot, where I say "also" followed by "as well".
7
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2answers
2k views

Did she judge him “wrong” or “wrongly”?

Which one is the correct use? She judged him wrong. She judged him wrongly. Or, are both correct, but have slightly different meanings?
8
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4answers
13k views

“A year ago” versus “a year back”

I recently came across an article printed in our school magazine, which read, "I studied that a year ago". But, doesn't "I studied that a year back" sound better? What's your say?
13
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3answers
42k views

Correct usage of “parallel” versus “in parallel” versus “parallelly”

I wish to know if any of the following sentences are incorrect: Using A and B parallel. Using A and B in parallel. Using A and B parallelly. Now I suspect most people are going to ...
5
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2answers
3k views

Auxiliary verb and adverb ordering

(I'm not really sure if the title is a correct definition of my problem at all) I'm not a native English speaker, and I'm used to say: Spaghetti suddenly can talk But I've seen a phrase from a ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Take -ing as adverb

I am a fan of Devil May Cry. In Devil May Cry 4, the highest rank for fighting is called smokin' sick style. Here, it seems that smokin' is used as an adverb. I guess it is derived from the usage ...
8
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4answers
10k views

What exactly does “already” mean when used in the imperative mood?

This is a question about American English usage of the word "already". As a UK resident I don't completely understand when I hear Americans give commands like "Stop it already!" In the UK the word ...
3
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6answers
566 views

What is “newbie” as an adverb?

The title says it all! What is newbie as an adverb?
1
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2answers
175 views

Which is more correct: well or good? within the context given: [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the difference between “good” and “well” "I work equally well as part of a team or as an independent researcher." or "I work equally good ...
9
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2answers
18k views

“In toto” versus “in total”

Are the phrases "in total" and "in toto" interchangeable, or is "in total" a corruption of "in toto"?
42
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6answers
286k views

Is it “Yours faithfully” or “Yours sincerely”?

When should one sign a letter with "Yours faithfully" or "Yours sincerely"?
3
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1answer
1k views

Semantics and frequency of use of different adverb orderings

Is there any semantic difference between these two sentences? Also, is any of them more "correct" or frequently used than the other? This problem has been recently addressed by several authors ...
1
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2answers
214 views

How to modify “one-third” by an adverb?

Would it be correct to merge with hyphens one-third-contiguously in the following phrase? I propose to elect by 3 quotas, each per one-thirds-contiguously of time-zones.
4
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2answers
6k views

“Most every” and “almost every”

What is the difference between "most every" and "almost every"? Do they differ in amount?
14
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8answers
30k views

“Maybe” versus “perhaps”

Was there ever a real distinction between the two? I always have the urge to use maybe for discussing state and perhaps for actions. I know this is only because perhaps (by hap) and happen (befall by ...
30
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2answers
19k views

What is the difference between “maybe” and “may be”?

What is the difference in meaning and usage between maybe and may be? Are they synonymous?
4
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4answers
31k views

Is “I personally” incorrect?

Every time I hear someone trot out the phrase "I personally" it grates against my ears. I wouldn't mind so much, but it very commonly used by a wide variety of people. I grates most because I'm not ...
1
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2answers
4k views

How do I use “verily”?

Since verily means truly or certainly. Can I use it where I would normally use certainly? Like: I certainly think that is appropriate. I verily think that is appropriate. If yes, are there ...
2
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5answers
5k views

Can 'default' be an adverb?

Consider the following sentence: Whenever possible, default and explicitly mapped names are honored as written. It seems to me that default and explicitly both talk about how the names are ...
16
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3answers
72k views

How do I properly hyphenate “well thought out”?

Is it spelled well thought-out, or well-thought out, or well thought out?
1
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3answers
538 views

Meaning of the adverb 'differently' and its position

Perceptual constancy refers to our ability to see things differently without having to reinterpret the object's properties. Is differently referring to we see or things?
8
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2answers
206 views

Get a high speed connection without roaming charges instantly

I saw this message on an advert: Get a high speed connection without roaming charges instantly. I am pretty sure that a better way to say it is: Instantly get a high speed connection ...
3
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2answers
30k views

Is one more correct: “lucky for me” or “luckily for me”?

Is it "more" correct to say "Luckily for me" or "Lucky for me"? I found a few sites that discussed this (including m-w.com, under the rubric "hopefully") but I'm still not sure if one is specifically ...
8
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5answers
28k views

What is the difference between “owing to” and “due to”?

"Due to" seems more common than "owing to" in modern English. Is "owing to" simply an old-fashioned way of saying the same thing, or is there a rule to using it?
10
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5answers
8k views

Should “anymore” only be used in a negative statement or question?

I don't know why this is so, but I've always believed that the word anymore should only be used in a question or negative statement. Do you go there anymore? Don't do that anymore. But I often ...
0
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3answers
1k views

Position of adverb 'globally' in sentence and meaning of sentence

Please help me make sense of this sentence with regards to 'globally'. In the global arena, xxxxxx has been described as the solution to the challenges facing the commodities market globally ...
18
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5answers
112k views

Should an adverb go before or after a verb?

For example: The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. The word turns up rarely outside of those contexts. Which one is correct and why?
2
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1answer
421 views

About the position of the object clause

1.Which of the sentences below is best, and why? People are saying that this is great about X (for example: our new product). People are saying about X that this is great. People are saying ...
6
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3answers
2k views

Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence?

For example: Ever wish you could share information broadly Could it be rewritten to: Ever wish you could broadly share information Are there any rules for the position of the adverbs.
3
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5answers
1k views

Is it wrong to say “very almost”?

I hear phrases like I very almost fell over! often and to me they sound awkward. Is the word, "very", wrong, just superfluous or completely valid? Should this wording be avoided?
4
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2answers
653 views

Is this an adverbial clause?

I see a sentence in this site: But both can be quite strong depending on how they are spoken. Is depending on […] an adverbial clause?
1
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2answers
12k views

Is the following usage of “matter-of-factly” correct?

Most of the usage of "matter-of-factly" that I've seen is to describe a manner of speaking - "He said, matter of factly,...", etc. A friend brought up the following usage, which seems wrong, but I ...
10
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4answers
96k views

Should there be a comma before “though” when it occurs at the end of a sentence?

Consider I don't know how outdated it is though. Should there be a comma before though, as in the following? I don't know how outdated it is, though.
10
votes
11answers
218k views

Which is correct: “drive safe” or “drive safely”?

When someone is going to drive their car somewhere, I always used to say "drive safely" to them. Recently I was told I should say "drive safe." (From: Would you ask someone to drive safe or to ...
11
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7answers
13k views

When did the word “so” begin to be used to start a sentence?

In the last few years, I've noticed a growing usage of the word "so" to begin a sentence, especially in the context of higher education. For example: Interviewer: "What is the nature of your ...
2
votes
1answer
664 views

What is “however” in this sentence referring to?

No definite mass is identified. However, for further evaluation of this patient given his symptoms, an MRI is recommended. In the above sentence, does the "however" refer back to looking for a mass ...
8
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1answer
3k views

What are the limitations on the “there + preposition” construction?

I use words such as thereof, thereupon, and thereafter relatively often, but I occasionally find myself wanting to use this construction with different prepositions. Most times it's therefor, which I ...
3
votes
1answer
35k views

Meaning of “yet” in “the best is yet to come”

And the best is yet to come. In the above sentence, to be to means "will", yet means "already". So, does the sentence mean the best has already come or that it will come?
0
votes
1answer
398 views

Question on usage on 'Rating Yourself'

Assuming you are the interviewer and would you ask the candidate: How would you rate yourself on the scale from 1 to 10? What would you rate yourself on the scale of 1 to 10? Which ...
1
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2answers
6k views

Is it acceptable to say “more [adjective]” when there is already a dedicated form making “more” unnecessary (e.g. “angrier” vs. “more angry”)?

For years, it irritated me that people kept using "more [adjective]" where there were already dedicated forms making "more" unnecessary. For example, people would say "more tight" than "tighter". I ...