An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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42
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6answers
278k views

Is it “Yours faithfully” or “Yours sincerely”?

When should one sign a letter with "Yours faithfully" or "Yours sincerely"?
3
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1answer
1k views

Semantics and frequency of use of different adverb orderings

Is there any semantic difference between these two sentences? Also, is any of them more "correct" or frequently used than the other? This problem has been recently addressed by several authors ...
1
vote
2answers
213 views

How to modify “one-third” by an adverb?

Would it be correct to merge with hyphens one-third-contiguously in the following phrase? I propose to elect by 3 quotas, each per one-thirds-contiguously of time-zones.
4
votes
2answers
5k views

“Most every” and “almost every”

What is the difference between "most every" and "almost every"? Do they differ in amount?
13
votes
8answers
29k views

“Maybe” versus “perhaps”

Was there ever a real distinction between the two? I always have the urge to use maybe for discussing state and perhaps for actions. I know this is only because perhaps (by hap) and happen (befall by ...
30
votes
2answers
19k views

What is the difference between “maybe” and “may be”?

What is the difference in meaning and usage between maybe and may be? Are they synonymous?
4
votes
4answers
30k views

Is “I personally” incorrect?

Every time I hear someone trot out the phrase "I personally" it grates against my ears. I wouldn't mind so much, but it very commonly used by a wide variety of people. I grates most because I'm not ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

How do I use “verily”?

Since verily means truly or certainly. Can I use it where I would normally use certainly? Like: I certainly think that is appropriate. I verily think that is appropriate. If yes, are there ...
2
votes
5answers
5k views

Can 'default' be an adverb?

Consider the following sentence: Whenever possible, default and explicitly mapped names are honored as written. It seems to me that default and explicitly both talk about how the names are ...
16
votes
3answers
71k views

How do I properly hyphenate “well thought out”?

Is it spelled well thought-out, or well-thought out, or well thought out?
1
vote
3answers
535 views

Meaning of the adverb 'differently' and its position

Perceptual constancy refers to our ability to see things differently without having to reinterpret the object's properties. Is differently referring to we see or things?
8
votes
2answers
206 views

Get a high speed connection without roaming charges instantly

I saw this message on an advert: Get a high speed connection without roaming charges instantly. I am pretty sure that a better way to say it is: Instantly get a high speed connection ...
3
votes
2answers
30k views

Is one more correct: “lucky for me” or “luckily for me”?

Is it "more" correct to say "Luckily for me" or "Lucky for me"? I found a few sites that discussed this (including m-w.com, under the rubric "hopefully") but I'm still not sure if one is specifically ...
8
votes
5answers
27k views

What is the difference between “owing to” and “due to”?

"Due to" seems more common than "owing to" in modern English. Is "owing to" simply an old-fashioned way of saying the same thing, or is there a rule to using it?
10
votes
5answers
8k views

Should “anymore” only be used in a negative statement or question?

I don't know why this is so, but I've always believed that the word anymore should only be used in a question or negative statement. Do you go there anymore? Don't do that anymore. But I often ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Position of adverb 'globally' in sentence and meaning of sentence

Please help me make sense of this sentence with regards to 'globally'. In the global arena, xxxxxx has been described as the solution to the challenges facing the commodities market globally ...
16
votes
5answers
109k views

Should an adverb go before or after a verb?

For example: The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. The word turns up rarely outside of those contexts. Which one is correct and why?
2
votes
1answer
421 views

About the position of the object clause

1.Which of the sentences below is best, and why? People are saying that this is great about X (for example: our new product). People are saying about X that this is great. People are saying ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence?

For example: Ever wish you could share information broadly Could it be rewritten to: Ever wish you could broadly share information Are there any rules for the position of the adverbs.
3
votes
5answers
1k views

Is it wrong to say “very almost”?

I hear phrases like I very almost fell over! often and to me they sound awkward. Is the word, "very", wrong, just superfluous or completely valid? Should this wording be avoided?
4
votes
2answers
652 views

Is this an adverbial clause?

I see a sentence in this site: But both can be quite strong depending on how they are spoken. Is depending on […] an adverbial clause?
1
vote
2answers
12k views

Is the following usage of “matter-of-factly” correct?

Most of the usage of "matter-of-factly" that I've seen is to describe a manner of speaking - "He said, matter of factly,...", etc. A friend brought up the following usage, which seems wrong, but I ...
9
votes
4answers
94k views

Should there be a comma before “though” when it occurs at the end of a sentence?

Consider I don't know how outdated it is though. Should there be a comma before though, as in the following? I don't know how outdated it is, though.
10
votes
11answers
209k views

Which is correct: “drive safe” or “drive safely”?

When someone is going to drive their car somewhere, I always used to say "drive safely" to them. Recently I was told I should say "drive safe." (From: Would you ask someone to drive safe or to ...
11
votes
7answers
13k views

When did the word “so” begin to be used to start a sentence?

In the last few years, I've noticed a growing usage of the word "so" to begin a sentence, especially in the context of higher education. For example: Interviewer: "What is the nature of your ...
2
votes
1answer
662 views

What is “however” in this sentence referring to?

No definite mass is identified. However, for further evaluation of this patient given his symptoms, an MRI is recommended. In the above sentence, does the "however" refer back to looking for a mass ...
8
votes
1answer
3k views

What are the limitations on the “there + preposition” construction?

I use words such as thereof, thereupon, and thereafter relatively often, but I occasionally find myself wanting to use this construction with different prepositions. Most times it's therefor, which I ...
3
votes
1answer
34k views

Meaning of “yet” in “the best is yet to come”

And the best is yet to come. In the above sentence, to be to means "will", yet means "already". So, does the sentence mean the best has already come or that it will come?
0
votes
1answer
395 views

Question on usage on 'Rating Yourself'

Assuming you are the interviewer and would you ask the candidate: How would you rate yourself on the scale from 1 to 10? What would you rate yourself on the scale of 1 to 10? Which ...
1
vote
2answers
6k views

Is it acceptable to say “more [adjective]” when there is already a dedicated form making “more” unnecessary (e.g. “angrier” vs. “more angry”)?

For years, it irritated me that people kept using "more [adjective]" where there were already dedicated forms making "more" unnecessary. For example, people would say "more tight" than "tighter". I ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views
1
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2answers
1k views

Is that an adverbial participle? Should there be a comma?

I found the following sentence: In part of my spare time, I work on fun projects. I am not sure as to whether there should be a comma. If it is there, then this obeys some rules, for example on ...
4
votes
4answers
12k views

What is the difference between “truthfully” and “honestly”?

These are different words, and their usage (context) differs substantially. How would you define them or explain the difference (if you believe there is one)?
5
votes
1answer
29k views

What is the difference between “particularly” and “in particular”?

Is there any difference between particularly and in particular? When should I use each one of them?
3
votes
3answers
3k views

Is “more poorly” an appropriate phrase?

Today I described someone as being trained to react "more poorly" to a given situation. Her current reaction is poor. It is becoming more poor. So she reacts more poorly. Is this correct? It sounds ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

“Just” vs “already”: which one is sooner?

Which one is sooner or closer to now? I've just called him. I've already called him.
4
votes
2answers
852 views

What is the word “who”?

Is the word "who" an adverb? If not, what is it? If it is an adverb, what type of adverb is it?
30
votes
5answers
2k views

What are the historical processes of preposition coining in English?

RegDwight's excellent answer showing the historical usage of despite got me thinking about the processes by which new prepositions are coined. Prepositions are generally considered a closed class, and ...
6
votes
7answers
23k views

What is the difference between “probably” and “possibly”? [closed]

Recently I saw the movie "Pursuit of Happyness", which is actually quite good, and I noticed the actor (Will Smith) asking the difference between probably and possibly to his son. So I would like to ...
8
votes
1answer
19k views

When do we use “rarely, hardly, seldom”?

I'd like to know when should we use "rarely" and "hardly" and "seldom". Can we use these adverbs in the same situation? Or do we need to follow some criteria for using those different adverbs?
6
votes
2answers
3k views

Position of the adverb “of course”

...which is of course zero. ...which of course is zero. Which one is preferred?
8
votes
3answers
3k views

“Hard” vs. “hardly”

I have always found the pronounced distinction in meaning between "studying hard" and "hardly studying" a bit amusing. What is the origin of the word hardly? How is it etymologically connected to ...
3
votes
1answer
174 views

“not meant merely to” vs “not merely meant to”

I don't know which of the two is more correct: This site is not meant merely to determine the popularity of specific tools. This site is not merely meant to determine the popularity of ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

different usage of the word “only”

What is the difference between the following sentences? Basically, I would like to understand how the meaning changes with the usage of only in each of them. He only speaks English. He speaks only ...
26
votes
7answers
4k views

How common is “thrice”?

Our proofreader, a native speaker of American English, just won't let me use this word. Every single time I try to sneak it onto one of our sites, she replaces it with three times. Now, I do realize ...
7
votes
3answers
18k views

Is “caught you unawares” correct?

I read a book and came across "caught you unawares". I kept thinking it's supposed to be "caught you unaware". Is this an acceptable form or was that a typo or something?
28
votes
4answers
17k views

Correct position of “only”

Which is grammatically correct? I can only do so much in this time. or I can do only so much in this time.
10
votes
3answers
13k views

“currently not” or “not currently”

What's the correct order: Lessons are not currently being offered. or Lessons are currently not being offered.
5
votes
3answers
13k views

Place of “often” in the sentence

My question is simple. Is the following sentence correct? They don't watch TV often. My English teacher has told me that the only correct option is: They don't often watch TV. Is she ...
7
votes
2answers
4k views

What's the difference between “hence” and “thus”?

Can anyone explain the difference between hence and thus and when should we use one and not the other?