An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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“natural and artificially flavored” or “naturally and artificially flavored”?

I saw a food label that read: "natural and artificially flavored" A friend suggested this was the correct wording: "naturally and artificially flavored" Which is correct and why?
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2answers
86 views

Where should the adverb “soon” be positioned?

It says that the position of adverbs should come before the verb and the example they give is: We will soon have a break. In this example, is it not acceptable to have the adverb after the verb: ...
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How did “that is” evolve into informal “as in”? [closed]

Someone might write: Our ​friends, that is to say ​our son's ​friends, will ​meet us at the ​airport. Yet, say: Our ​friends, as in ​our son's ​friends, will ​meet us at the ​airport. How ...
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37 views

adverbs in perfect tenses

I have a question that is making my blood boil. Today watching a classic movie, Betty Davis said "I'd have never done that". I realize it is "I would have never done that". This is not the ...
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1answer
145 views

Adjectives used as adverbs/ verbs used as adjectives/ verbs used as adverbs

First question: I have been reading English: An Essential Grammar by Gerald Nelson and it gives an example of the words 'hard' and 'fast' being used as both adjectives and adverbs: Adverb: John ...
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1answer
58 views

is newspeak in close proximity to the present trend? [closed]

I can't think of a way to question the use of the phrase "close proximity" without expressing an opinion or asking for one (and that applies both to the specific case of this phrase and wider ...
2
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1answer
120 views

Adverb to show both surprise and fear

I need an adverb to show both surprise and fear. Can we use shockingly or worriedly? For example, He asked shockingly.
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1answer
53 views

Use of the word 'respectively' [duplicate]

I want to know if the following sentence is grammatically correct: "John's largest tomato and largest pumpkin outweighed Bill's by 2 and 17 pounds, respectively." I am trying to say "John's largest ...
14
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4answers
97k views

“I'm home” or “I'm at home”

The second form looks more correct to me, but the first expression is present in several titles of movies and songs. Which form is preferable?
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6answers
15k views

“Hardly” vs. “barely”

I'm from Germany and in German both translate to the same word (kaum). I'd like to know the difference between these two words, hardly and barely.
3
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2answers
55 views

Use of 'already' in future tenses

I understand that 'already' is good friends with perfect tenses and it can also be used with the present and the past, but what about future tenses? I found the following sentences on the Internet: ...
2
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3answers
972 views

Four-word phrase stress

I'm interested to learn why the following four-word phrases have stress on different words. "Little Red Riding Hood" (stress is on little and riding) "Infamous National Rifle Association" ...
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0answers
20 views

Adverbs order in sentences and their meaning (what's emphasised)? [duplicate]

I'm from Germany and so I've got some problems with adverbs. As you might know, in german there are no differences between adjectives and adverbs. I know the difference between adverbs and ...
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3answers
21k views

“Definitely” vs. “absolutely”

What's the difference between absolutely and definitely? Actually which of the following sentences is correct? You are definitely right. You are absolutely right.
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1answer
45 views

Therefore in the middle of a sentence

Their orientation is therefore well described by... Does this use of therefore in the middle of the sentence, reduce fluidity or sound not suitable for a written text? Should I use commas ...
0
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1answer
78 views

“Speak loudly” vs “speak aloud” [closed]

People, speak loudly. People, speak aloud. These two sentences have the same meaning, don't they? What is the difference between loudly and aloud?
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5answers
7k views

“Overseas” vs. “abroad”

I'm a native speaker of Inland Northern American English. My intuition tells me that the word "abroad" is unremarkable, especially in collocations like "study abroad". However, I've been ...
3
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1answer
192 views

If I change the part containing “conceivably”, does this sentence still have the same meaning?

I found a sentence in my programming book: Note that the delimiter does not have to be a bracket and could be conceivably any character. If I extracted the part: could be conceivably any ...
3
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3answers
122 views

adjective or adverb before ing-form?

Let's consider the example sentence Alice's trying to frame him had left Bob wary of anything she might do or say in his presence. If I now wanted to express that Alice allegedly tried to frame ...
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1answer
42 views

be confused the use between adjective and adverb when it is in front of adjective [duplicate]

How to use adjective and adverb correctly without being confusing. In this case because when I translate this sentence from my mother language to English, it fairly seem to be the same. Please help ...
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2answers
66 views

Adverb placement, before or after the verb [duplicate]

first time on this side of the StackExchange. Quick question: My dream is to code a chess game, and then have the AI I developed checkmate me legitimately. vs. My dream is to code a ...
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4answers
261 views

Grammatical function of 'shuffling' in 'He came shuffling out'

Here are examples of usage: Almost immediately Mr Bartletop came shuffling out. (source) I started violently when she came shuffling out. (source) She stood in the court as the Germans came ...
3
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4answers
352 views

Turn out “good” vs turn out “well”

Should one say: "turn out good" or "turn out well" I have always preferred the latter, but found the form "turn out good" in the book by Raymond Murphy: "English Grammar in use".
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1answer
28 views

“Both win in this case, the students […] and science…” is the sentence incorrect?

I am unsure regarding this usage of 'both'. A friend of mine told me it is not correct. Both win in this case, the students who learned a new technique and science with more replications. Could ...
2
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3answers
122 views

Definite article with the superlative degree of adverbs

Our rotary telephone is the least frequently used device in our house. Ben moved most quietly as the boys walked down the darkened ally. In the first sentence a superlative adverb is used ...
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3answers
7k views

“Goes good with” or “goes well with”

Let's say that A and B are two different kinds of foods. Which is grammatically correct? A goes good with B. A goes well with B. If they're both correct, then which is better?
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2answers
31 views

The graph comprises vertices only/solely/exclusively/entirely from one of the sets A and B. [closed]

are the adverbs interchangeable in this case, or would you prefer one over another? I want to state that the graph does not comprise any vertices other than the ones that are contained in one of the ...
2
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1answer
28 views

Adverbs describing Adverbs

We have a similar question here, but I think my examples are a bit different and I would love to understand how this is done correctly. Let's say we are talking about significantly higher ...
3
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2answers
80 views

Position of the adverb “substantially”

What would be the right position of "substantially" in the following: 1). Before verb: These optimal values substantially contribute to the success of the methodology. 2). After verb: These ...
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2answers
2k views

What is the grammatical function of “never”?

What is the grammatical function of "never" in the following sentence? You will have to do something you've never done. Is it an adverb? My father disagrees with this. In "I have studied" vs. ...
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2answers
1k views

Subject-auxiliary inversions not associated with questions [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Inversion in “only [adverb] have they” Is there some rule governing the following, or similar, subject-auxiliary inversions (*"Rarely they do see the light of day", ...
2
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2answers
245 views

To what extent is hardly a negative adverb?

The American Heritage Dictionary notes about adverbs like hardly that they are not truly negative in meaning. The sentence Mary hardly laughed means that Mary did laugh a little, not that she ...
2
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2answers
57 views

Placing of adverb in a sentence

"This should perfectly be done". "This should be perfectly done". Of the two sentences, which one is correct? I am confused about placing of adverb "perfectly". Should the adverb be placed before ...
19
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5answers
870 views

How did the adjective “just” come to take on so many adverbial meanings?

Just is a pretty useful adverb. It can carry several different meanings: very recently: I just finished the novel. exactly: That’s just what he meant. by a narrow margin: He just missed me ...
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1answer
57 views

What is the difference between “ago” and “before”? [closed]

What is the difference between ago and before when they are both used as adverbs in the following sentences: I saw him seven days ago. and I had seen him seven days before.
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2answers
59 views

Moreover between commas

While writing, I am often tempted to write sentences as: It is, moreover, clear that... or We have, in addition, other things to take into account. Is the use of the conjunctive adverbs ...
0
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1answer
45 views

Splitting the components of a compound verb [duplicate]

I've always understood that splitting infinitives should be avoided; e.g., instead of To boldly go where no man has gone before. use To go boldly where no man has gone before. With that in ...
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2answers
38 views

Use of “then” as “therefore” [closed]

I am confused about the following use of then: «I can't come to Bristol in the afternoon, sorry» «Let's meet around noon, then.» «I can't do it, I am sorry.» «Well, I'll do it, then!» I ...
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1answer
39 views

Can you “slide your finger across a word”? [closed]

How would you explain users of a mobile game how to use this feature ? I have a few ideas but I fear they might not sound natural to native English speakers: "Display the definition of any word by ...
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1answer
867 views

Degrees of comparison for words ending in “-ly”

Would you make a word ending in -ly positive, comparative, or superlative? I'm sort of leaning towards positive at the moment, and if the answer is positive, would you put more and most for ...
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3answers
112 views

Adverbs modifying nouns?

1. What this question is about It is about cases where an adverb apparently modifies a word of a type that adverbs aren't supposed to be able to modify, like nouns and personal pronouns. It is very ...
2
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2answers
72 views

Difference between an adverb modifying an NP consisting a single noun, and an adverb modifying a noun

Consider the following examples: The work is mostly Kim's. Only Kim resigned. A question some of us had (e.g. here and here) was, aren't these examples of adverbs modifying nouns (which they are not ...
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2answers
78 views

Live curious or live curiously? [closed]

Why does national geographic use "live curious" instead of "live curiously"? I suppose we should use adverbs to describe verbs.
0
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1answer
116 views

“Look real” or “look realistic”?

Which phrase is correct "the ship model looks real" or "the ship model looks realistic?" It seems that according to some dictionary definitions they are both acceptable in this case.
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2answers
2k views

How do you modify an adverb with another adverb?

This is the case I have in mind. I wish to express that impact acted in a way that was severely adverse. It impacted her severely adversely. The proposed text above doesn't feel right at all, ...
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1answer
53 views

Further or Farther in a metaphor about a road [duplicate]

In this metaphor is it correct to use "further" or "farther"? That only kicks the can further/farther down the road. Within the metaphor, the distance is physical, justifying the use of ...
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3answers
3k views

“strongly” or “strong”?

Is strongly correct in the following, or should it be strong? ... and had a strongly Protestant and unionist identity. What is the explanation in grammar terms? Context.
2
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2answers
235 views

Adverbs with prepositions

Much to my surprise, I've read recently that some adverbs do not inherit prepositional constructions from the adjectives they come from, for example: "The proof of Theorem 3 is similar to that of ...
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62 views

Nowhere near and nowhere close to

I am so confused about which is modifying which. In the sentence below: It was nowhere close to being done. Nowhere: An adverb modifying close It's the farthest I could get. I don't know if ...
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2answers
29k views

Difference between “recently” and “lately”

I have posted a topic using this sentence: I have picked some fictions to read lately. RegDwight edited this sentence to: I have recently picked up several works of fiction and begun to read ...