An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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“How deep” or “How deeply”?

In the sentence: How deep or deeply should I study something? Which of the two is more appropriate?
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1answer
57 views

Word for doing something but not wanting other people to notice? [closed]

It's not secretly. For example, I'm at a mall with a friend, then I notice someone from my school. I point to them to show my friend, who I go to school with. But I don't want the other person to ...
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2answers
34 views

Why are both blazing or blazingly appropriate?

This SE QA explains that both blazing and blazingly are valid English words (despite what my spell-checker claims). Can anyone explain why they are both valid, and the difference between the words. ...
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3answers
1k views

Position of adverb 'globally' in sentence and meaning of sentence

Please help me make sense of this sentence with regards to 'globally'. In the global arena, xxxxxx has been described as the solution to the challenges facing the commodities market globally ...
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5answers
26k views

“Eventually” vs. “finally”

What is the difference between finally and eventually? He eventually escaped and made his way back to England. He finally escaped and made his way back to England.
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1answer
62 views

What part of speech is “alight” in “set alight”?

In the clause it was set alight, is alight acting as adverb and modifying was set an adjective and modifying it; or something else entirely that I'm missing. I'm fairly certain that set ...
6
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1answer
191 views

“along” in “the wolf passed something along to me”

Here is a quote by Jack Nicholson from the movie "Wolf": Since it happened I feel as though the wolf passed something along to me. I wonder why is along needed in that sentence? What difference ...
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2answers
551 views

'but' for contrast and 'but' for opposition

But does not mean the same thing in I like pop music but my parents like classical music. and in My parents have played a lot of classical music to me but I still don't like it. What is ...
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2answers
168 views

The correct syntactic usage of “Only”

Question #1: Which of the following sentences has the correct syntactic usage of the word "only"? Question #2: What do the remaining sentences mean? Examples: Only I gave him $1. I only ...
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1answer
104 views

Why does “eastwardly” have two opposite meanings?

"Eastwardly" can mean either from the east or to the east. How does one use it without ambiguity?
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3answers
656 views

Adverb for “multiple”

Say that I have a Pokémon with 2 types: Fire and Flying. One could say this Pokémon has "multiple types." That is because the designer of this Pokémon "typed" it that way. Is it correct to say the ...
18
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4answers
820 views

How did the adjective “just” come to take on so many adverbial meanings?

Just is a pretty useful adverb. It can carry several different meanings: very recently: I just finished the novel. exactly: That’s just what he meant. by a narrow margin: He just missed me ...
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0answers
32 views

When to use “-ly” (scientific language)

I'm wondering about what is the correct wording and in particular, which grammar rules are underlying your decision. Some loci are expressed independent of the environment. Some loci are expressed ...
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1answer
66 views

Using affordably as an adverb

I wish to write: The product cost is affordably accessible to all consumer types. I mean to say: The product cost is so affordable, any type of consumer can afford it. Can I use ...
2
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1answer
49 views

Why “Here COMES the bus!” but “Here he COMES!”? [duplicate]

What is the difference between: Here he comes! and Here comes the bus! Why in the first sentence "comes" is placed after the subject "he", but in 2nd one before the subject "the bus"?
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2answers
51 views
12
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8answers
26k views

“Maybe” versus “perhaps”

Was there ever a real distinction between the two? I always have the urge to use maybe for discussing state and perhaps for actions. I know this is only because perhaps (by hap) and happen (befall by ...
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1answer
37 views

Why is an interrogative pronoun not an adverb?

Consider these two sentences. A. Which museum did you visit? B. Which did you visit? In the first case the word "which" functions as an adjective modifying museum and in the second an interrogative ...
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3answers
42 views

Grammar: the function of “so” after conjunction?

Recently I read this sentence, and I am wondering, what is the function of "so" here? XYZ is the top provider of high-speed Internet services in the country, or so it claims in its ...
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4answers
25 views

A Conjunctive Adverb for Reverse

I'm looking for a simplistic manner to say To reverse a little, ... or To go back to an earlier statement, ... A single word conjunctive adverb would be best, similar to furthermore or ...
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2answers
2k views

A relative adverb or a conjunction or both?

I am not familiar with the idea that an adverb can function as a conjunction at the same time. Here are a couple of sentences that are confusing me. This is the reason why she left him. ...and ...
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3answers
46 views

Is the word “do” an adverb or helping verb

In the sentence "Small children certainly do need careful supervising." Is the word "do" an adverb modifying "need" or is it a helping verb to the main verb "need"? I'm grading papers and a student ...
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2answers
74 views

Concluding vs Concludingly

My English teacher has taught me to use "Concluding" when writing the end part of certain texts (next to other words).Example: Concluding, we can say that... To me it somehow sounds curious. ...
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4answers
240 views

Use and position of the adverb “instead” when introducing the second of two items

Is the use of the adverb instead appropriate, and correct, in the last of the following three sentences? The top half of the figure shows the service provided by the system in a first, generic ...
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1answer
51 views

Words and phrases to express approximations

I would like to know the distinctions between these following words and phrases when they express approximations. I will be there in about an hour. I will be there in around an hour. I will be ...
7
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1answer
525 views

Why not 'somewhy'?

For this ELL question, a desire for concision motivated me originally to use 'somewhy' instead of 'for some reason'; afterwards, a user kindly advised that 'somewhy' obsolesced. Why? Google ...
2
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1answer
101 views

Using multiple adverbs for the same verb

Is is appropriate to use multiple adverbs in a row, such as in: This car is powered fully electrically. For my understanding both adjectives full and electric do refer to the verb "to power" and ...
4
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3answers
5k views

What is the difference between “good” and “well”

Most of the time, I use good and well interchangeably. However, on many occasions I would find well or good a misfit. Please suggest the proper usage.
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2answers
161 views

What are the adverb and adjective for “content”?

Well, as it is said in the title of my question, I'm wondering what the adjective and adverb of content are. Similarly, we have context whose adjective and adverb are contextual and contextually ...
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4answers
5k views

Doubtless or doubtlessly?

To my surprise I found that doubtless is used as an adverb without appending the "-ly". Doubtless, some of you will know more examples. It feels wrong, but then again, I am not a native ...
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2answers
15k views

“But (something) instead” versus “but instead (something)”

Please consider the sentences: They do not overpower the city, but empower it instead. They do not overpower the city, but instead empower it. I'm doubting the use of but + instead. Is ...
4
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2answers
106 views

“None but the brave deserves the fair.” What part of speech is “but”?

In the sentence: None but the brave deserves the fair. ...is the word but here a: pronoun adverb preposition conjunction Normally but is used as conjunction, but here I am not sure if this ...
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3answers
100 views

“quickly walk” or “walk quickly” [duplicate]

Is it "walk quickly" or "quickly walk?" What is the correct way to phrase the sentence: Please walk quickly. Please quickly walk. Thank you.
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2answers
99 views

Is there a suffix to form a noun from an adverb?

I want to know if we have a suffix which can be added to an adverb to form a noun. I have searched about that and I could not find anything about it.
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9answers
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How did “run over him” evolve to “run him over” over the last 50 years?

Growing up in Alabama, I never heard anyone bastardize the phrase "run over him (with the car)" to "run him over (with the car)", not even on TV or movies. I first noticed the change as I began to ...
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1answer
410 views

“based on” usage

I'm a little bit confused when I use a sentence like "It is divided based on glasses of milk". I'm not sure that it is used as an adverb or in the passive voice? Thanks.
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4answers
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What is the difference between “truthfully” and “honestly”?

These are different words, and their usage (context) differs substantially. How would you define them or explain the difference (if you believe there is one)?
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2answers
77 views

Explaining “despite” as a preposition

My question is provoked by a desire to better explain to my students grammatical conventions regarding "despite." I am finding that my own explanatory resources come up short in this regard. ...
0
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1answer
41 views

'Really!' Is it still an adverb?

I understand that 'really' is an adverb when it is describing an adjective in a sentence but what if it was an exclamation as in 'Really! I had no idea that was the case.' What part of speech would it ...
0
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1answer
28 views

“currently running survey” or “currently-running survey”?

I still struggle to understand exactly when to use hyphens when adverbs are involved. Which of the following is correct? ABC is an acronym representing the actual name of the survey. "I use results ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Increase the font size by 2 pixel or Increase the font size to 2 pixel?

Increase the font size by 2 pixel or Increase the font size to 2 pixel? Which one is correct, please let me know
0
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1answer
887 views

Adverb position problems

I am confused about adverbs that can be placed in front of the verb as in: He quickly reads a book. And can be used at the end of the sentence as in: He works hardly Can I mix them as: ...
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3answers
15k views

Why Is “You did well.” Even Grammatically Correct (American English)?

One of the classic battles prescriptive grammarians fight is that "You did good." is grammatically wrong, while "You did well." is correct. The justification for this is that "well" is a legitimate ...
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5answers
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Can “real” be used as an adverb to describe an adjective?

Is this correct? That is a real cool answer. I learned that that was incorrect, since "real" is an adjective which can describe a noun, e.g. "real answer" but it is not an adverb which can ...
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3answers
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We say entrepreneur and entrepreneurship, what is the verb?

For the word entrepreneur and entrepreneurship, I would like to know the corresponding verb, i.e the action of doing entrepreneurship, i.e the verb that should fit in the next sentence : To be a good ...
2
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1answer
43 views

Organizational term meaning “order appearing in a book” as contrasted to chronological

Is there a word that means "in the order something appears in a book or document" as opposed to chronological meaning "the order something occurs in time." Ignoring the fact that my examples may not ...
0
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2answers
57 views

“I can't well start a day” vs. “I can't start a day well”

I can't well start a day not running at least a few kilometres. I can't start a day well not running at least a few kilometres.
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3answers
2k views

Clarifying the usage of “hella”

The word hella has spread from the Southern California dialect to the point where most varieties of American English speaker (such as me in the Midwest) know that it exists and hear it used. I always ...
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3answers
82 views

What word could I replace “importantly” with in this sentence?

I am looking for a synonym to the word "importantly" in this sentence (as well as other grammar tips because this sentence is messing with my brain): "Perhaps more importantly, I learned the ...
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2answers
127 views

Correct Usage of Nigh in a sentence

Currently, I am trying to come up with a poetic title involving Nigh, Night, Ghost and Quiet. However, I have struggled to figure out correctly where I can place Nigh in a sentence and be ...