An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Is there a comparative form of “well”?

Is there a word that means "more well", in the same way that "better" means "more good"? In common parlance most people just use "better" for this purpose, but this seems incorrect and is a nagging ...
3
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2answers
489 views

Is “dissatisfactorily” the correct adverb for not satisfying?

I want to express something like this: She had asked him why he had done it, but he had replied dissatisfactorily; he said that he didn't know. I also thought, maybe "dissatisfyingly?" I'd like ...
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2answers
3k views

Usage of 'only' with a verb

They only stamp academic documents versus they stamp academic document only: which one is correct and what are the implications of the non-correct form? (Context: university office that does other ...
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3answers
478 views

“In almost” vs “Almost in”

Which of the following is correct? In almost all cases, ... Almost in all cases, ...
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4answers
3k views

When should “farther” and “further” be used?

I know I learned the difference between the usage of farther and further in school, but I can never remember where each one should be used. Can someone help me out here?
3
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1answer
234 views

Is “plantingly” an adverb?

Is plantingly an adverb form of plant? Can you give me a example sentence? Edit: This use of plantingly came from the following quote: Firstly I [would like] to thank you for taking the time from ...
14
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3answers
19k views

“Can easily be” vs. “can be easily” — what's the difference?

I'm wondering what the difference is between: It can easily be obtained. It can be easily obtained. Also, what's the preferred way to write it? If there is any... I googled for both ...
5
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2answers
1k views

Which one is grammatically correct? Why?

I've a quick question about grammar within a sentence. I'd also like to know why it is like that if someone could provide an answer. Which one is correct? Along with fishing, I enjoy ...
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3answers
1k views

“He was playing when he fell” or “he fell when he was playing”?

Which one is correct? He fell down when he was playing in the field. He was playing in the field when he fell down. Why?
14
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1answer
25k views

Forward vs Forwards [closed]

As an adverb, what is the difference between forward and forwards?
9
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4answers
15k views

Is there any difference between 'often' and 'frequently'?

Do both mean exactly the same or do they have slightly different meanings?
7
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5answers
3k views

Using the word 'Only'

I am confused about using the word only. I often hear it being used in many contexts that sound wrong to me - but I'm not sure if it's me or them. Let me give some examples: A: Where were you ...
5
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1answer
3k views

Proper representation of “vice versa”?

How should I properly use the word vice versa in writing? Is that even the correct spelling?
6
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3answers
5k views

Why do we use 'up' as adverbs for verbs?

Why do we use up as adverbs for verbs? For example, 'wake up', 'throw up', etc.
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3answers
3k views

“Backward” versus “backwards” — is there any difference?

The dictionaries I've looked in don't distinguish between these two words, backward and backwards (at least when used as adverbs). Is there some real historical, grammatical or regional difference ...
12
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1answer
2k views

What's the correct usage of “hopefully”?

I said, "Hopefully, I will get better" to a friend and he said that I was using it incorrectly, stating that hopefully is an adverb meaning "full of hope" that modifies a verb. It sounds right, but ...
7
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4answers
915 views

How can I learn to get collocations right?

I read an article about collocation which includes an example: We can say highly sophisticated, and we can say extremely happy. highly happy and extremely sophisticated would be wrong. How can I ...
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10answers
139k views

Is “fastly” a correct word?

Slow has the adverb slowly. I tend to use fastly as the adverb for fast. However, it is underlined in most spell checkers I use, which makes me wonder about the existence of this word. Is fastly a ...
4
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2answers
5k views

When should you use “then” and when “than”?

As far as I know, then is used in a conjunction and in time-related sentences; than in all other cases. I believe that these are correct: Because I'm older than she, I should be the first chosen; I ...
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5answers
5k views

“Irregardless” vs. “irrespective”

Why is irrespective considered a proper word but irregardless is not?
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6answers
34k views

Why do you say “so do I”?

Why is the order of the words in "so do I" or "nor do I" different from the normal order?
8
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2answers
264 views

Does “ever” apply to the future, or only the past?

As we hear in every commercial (ever?) Our best price, ever. Your thoughts please. Putting aside advertising allowances, should "ever" here mean "all time: past present and future", or should ...
13
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4answers
3k views

Can “real” be used as an adverb to describe an adjective?

Is this correct? That is a real cool answer. I learned that that was incorrect, since "real" is an adjective which can describe a noun, e.g. "real answer" but it is not an adverb which can ...
49
votes
9answers
4k views

Is “rather” shifting to become a verb?

In colloquial English, I constantly run across sentences of the form: I rather my [noun] [verb] A quick Google search returns tons of examples: I rather my opponents don't find out. I ...
26
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5answers
6k views

“Specially” vs “especially”

When should each of them be used?
4
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2answers
3k views

“Certainly” and “Of course”: what is the difference?

Is there any difference in expressing consent and assurance using adverbs "certainly" or "of course"? What would be more appropriate one in everyday conversation?
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4answers
3k views

“Well” and “good” as applied to the quality of photographs

These photos came out well. or These photos came out good. According to the proper usage of well and good, the former would be describing the quality of the taking and developing of the ...