An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Why is “fastly” not a word?

As well as being an adjective, fast is an adverb. We use it all the time as such: He ran fast. However, though slow is definitely an adjective, it sounds wrong when used as an adverb, because ...
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28k views

Difference between “recently” and “lately”

I have posted a topic using this sentence: I have picked some fictions to read lately. RegDwight edited this sentence to: I have recently picked up several works of fiction and begun to read ...
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“He acted strange(ly?)”

It would make sense if both of these sentences were grammatically correct; but is anything different between them meaning-wise? He acted very strange when I told him about the missing amulet. ...
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2k views

Synonyms and antonyms for “lacking” or “missing” when something is mandatory

I am searching for the correct term usage in my Java code, although you don't need to know anything about programming to answer my question. My "something" can be "required" (mandatory) or not ...
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Is there a difference between “quicker” and “more quickly”

This is a follow up to this question: What is the difference between "quicker" and "faster"? "Quicker" is an adverb, as are "more" (in this context) and "quickly". So is there a ...
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Referring to past times with “hence”

From Tor.com, an interesting use of the word hence: Minutes ago, J.K. Rowling finally announced her plans behind Pottermore, the mysterious website that appeared a week hence with only a “Coming ...
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2answers
501 views

Is there a reference book that lists words by usage or theme?

Similar to how a Thesaurus lists synonyms, is there a book that groups words (or phrases) together by conceptual usage? For example, this question is looking for words that describe a person's ...
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3answers
1k views

Does this ‘twice’ mean two times, or double in quantity?

She caught sight of Mr. Diggory’s feet, and slowly, tremulously, raised her eyes to stare up into his face; then, more slowly still, she looked up into the sky. Harry could see the floating skull ...
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919 views

Term meaning 'with written words'

In the same way that verbally means with spoken words, I'm looking for a term that means with written words. Is there such a word?
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4answers
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“Can hardly wait” versus “can't hardly wait”

This has been bothering me for a while and I'm finally at a forum where I feel like I might get an answer. I have heard people say "I can hardly wait for summer to get here" and I've also heard "I ...
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1answer
481 views

Usage of 'yesterday' for future [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: I need <something> yesterday? For couple of times, mostly in movies, I realized that yesterday is commonly used for future. Here is an example sentence: I want ...
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3answers
265 views

What sentence parts needs to be repeated here?

What of the following is right? "We need to find out..." "...how to lower the costs or how to produce more." "...how to lower the costs or to produce more." "...how to lower the costs or produce ...
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“Please explain” or “explain please”

Which one is correct in this context? Person A: I think Apple will displace Google. Person B: Please explain. Should he say/write "Explain please"?
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1answer
1k views

“Experimentally determined” vs. “determined experimentally”

Which of the following sentences is correct? The numbers are experimentally determined. The numbers are determined experimentally. Are both (not) correct and if only one of them is ...
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3answers
190 views

“The team is moving around really effectively.” Is this a correct use of “effectively”?

Something about this sounds wrong to me. The speaker intends the statement to mean that the team is moving around a lot and it is causing them to succeed. "The team is moving around really ...
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4answers
25k views

“Too serious” vs “too seriously”

I know the vast majority of people say "Don't take yourself too seriously", as found correct by basically every native speaker I've asked about this (often accompanied by incredulous looks). What ...
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6answers
653 views

Alternative to “lossily compressed”

Is there a better way to say "lossily compressed"? The adverb lossily can not be found in Merriam-Webster, but the adjective lossy can. It also feels a bit unnatural.
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400 views

Was I correct to use the word “establish” in my tweet? Should I have included adverbial “as”?

English is not my native language, but I'm a willing pupil and in most cases I'm pretty confident in my knowledge, but sometimes I hesitate to use particular words. I wrote this tweet recently: I ...
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2answers
1k views

Why is it, “It seems different”, but “It comes across differently”?

Both phrases describe the manner, appearance, air, etc, of a subject. Why does the former use an adjective to modify the subject, while the latter uses an adverb to modify the verb phrase?
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3answers
62k views

What is the precise meaning of “Pretty Good”?

Once I used "pretty good" as a reply to one of my friends' question "How are you today?", I was under the impression that the "pretty good" will weigh much more than just "good", means "very good" or ...
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4answers
4k views

Alternative to “separately from”?

I want to say something like: The system stores the crazygonuts data separately from the data feed. I think this is wrong (maybe I am wrong in that), but I'm not sure exactly why. One ...
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5answers
74k views

Part of speech of “very,” “extremely,” “really,” and “quite”

While working on developing the lexicon in one of my constructed languages, I encountered a slight difficulty in using standard classifications for words like very, extremely, really, and quite. To ...
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1answer
298 views

Is this usage of 'curiously' correct?

I recently used a sentence similar to the following: Curiously, do you prefer black? Some people found it grammatically incorrect. That was a surprise, for I thought it was perfectly okay. ...
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663 views

“Sounds almost like” vs. “almost sounds like”

Which sentence structure is more accurate? ... that sounds almost like a command. ... that almost sounds like a command.
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1answer
456 views

“Remain a cool kid” vs. “remain as a cool kid”

Which of the following is grammatical? He wants to remain a cool kid for the rest of his life. He wants to remain as a cool kid for the rest of his life.
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4answers
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Adverb to describe one's career?

I am writing a document where I need to describe a decision I'm making that is beneficial both to my finances and to furthering my career. I'm more partial to using two -ly adverbs to match the rhythm ...
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3answers
351 views

What should I use between “triple” vs. “all”?

If I have 2 pens and I want to say all of them are green, I can say "Both of them are green" but if I have 3 pens should I use "Triple of them are green" or "All of them are green"?
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Difference between “less” and “lesser”? [closed]

These two seem very similar. What are the major differences between the two? For example, in the following sentence, Substitute the lesser punishment for the greater one. Can one use "less" ...
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1answer
687 views

How “Barely better-than-even-odd” success is better as compared with 50:50 success?

According to Washington Post’s Breaking News Alert (May 8), President Obama faced sharply divided counsel and, in his mind, barely better-than-even odds of success when he ordered the daring May 1 ...
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2answers
459 views

Why is “hopefully” treated so mercilessly?

Is the word "hopefully" unjustly treated? We don't like the sentence: "Hopefully, my ship is just over the horizon and due in real soon now." But we don't mind saying: "Happily, the tree fell on ...
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2answers
13k views

Where should adverbs be placed?

There are two sentences: I completely understand. I understand completely. Which one is correct and why? Another example: I slowly opened the door. I opened the door slowly.
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6answers
3k views

What are the arguments behind the “literally”/“figuratively” usage divide? When should one use either word?

I remember reading, some time in grade school, that there was a controversy about proper usage of figuratively and literally when used to denote meaning of a word in its strictest sense — but ...
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3answers
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Is “still” being used correctly in “I love you still”?

I've heard this sentence in a song ('Build me up buttercup'): When you say you will, but I love you still I'm used to seeing still in front of the verb or auxiliary verb as in "I still love ...
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1answer
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“for about one year” or “for around one year”

Which of the following sentences is correct or better? I have been using this software for about one year. I have been using this software for around one year. Searching in Google gives 14 ...
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1answer
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Which is correct here: “arbitrary” or “arbitrarily”?

Do you say "an arbitrarily small constant epsilon" or "an arbitrary small constant epsilon"? Or are both correct?
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339 views

Is “case-sensitively” a word?

A colleague just asked about comparing values "case sensitively". I see those words together on technical sites, but nowhere else. I myself see no problem with the phrase, though it sounds a bit ...
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3answers
5k views

What words typically collocate with “quite”?

The word quite is often confusing to non-native speakers. Can you give me a list of words that typically collocate with quite when the meaning is 'extreme'?
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3answers
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What word can I say if I want to give approximate number?

What to say if I want to tell approximate number of something. What should I say? E.g. I have (around/ about/ some) 5 books. Is there a rule for number approximation?
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How do you differentiate “thru”, “threw”, “through”, and “thorough”?

How do I know which word to use in the correct context? How do I recognize these words when hearing them? Examples: Jimmy threw the ring at Emiko. Elvis walked through the door. ...
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3answers
7k views

What is meant by saying “X, not to say Y”?

When someone says "X, not to say Y", do they mean "X, but not Y" or do they mean "X, and even Y"? Normally I would assume it's the first, but I've seen a few examples where it seems ambiguous. Or ...
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Common usage of “namely”

I got an email today: Medical will be sending some people over to give a talk, namely Joe Foo and Bob Bar. I know the dictionary says namely means: adverb /ˈnāmlē/  That is to say; to be ...
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2answers
273 views

When should I use “parallel” over “parallelism”, and vice versa?

I am a bit confused about the words parallel and parallelism: When and where should one use which?
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1answer
10k views

What is the correct usage of “meanwhile”?

I see meanwhile a lot; I use it a lot; yet I'm not sure about the formal rules when it's applicable. Can anyone help me?
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5answers
14k views

Is there any other way you can “wax” as you do when you “wax philosophical”?

The wax in the phrase "wax philosophical" is a pretty strange bird. Its wax is obviously not the ordinary definition of wax, which my dictionary summarizes as an "oily, water-resistant substance", a ...
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8answers
660 views

“Almost until 1900” or “until almost 1900”: which one is correct?

Although various eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American poets had professed an interest in Native American poetry and had pretended to imitate Native American forms in their own works, it was ...
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When to use commas in a sentence that starts with “finally”, “additionally”, etc.?

If I have a sentence that starts with additionally, finally, consequently, etc. do I always have to put a comma after it? Or is there a different rule?
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4answers
93k views

“I'm home” or “I'm at home”

The second form looks more correct to me, but the first expression is present in several titles of movies and songs. Which form is preferable?
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3answers
3k views

“strongly” or “strong”?

Is strongly correct in the following, or should it be strong? ... and had a strongly Protestant and unionist identity. What is the explanation in grammar terms? Context.
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14k views

What is the correct positioning of “Please” in a sentence or indeed is there one?

Please can you help me with this question? Can you please help me with this question? Can you help me with this question please? Is there a correct place for please in this question or ...
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18k views

“I feel bad for you” versus “I feel badly for you”

What is the correct usage? Apparently it is "I feel badly", but but wouldn't that mean you have an inadequate ability to feel?